Aladdin City

Name:

Aladdin City

County:

Miami-Dade

Zip Code:

33187

Latitude / Longitude:

25°34′1.37″N 80°27′13.85″W / 25.5670472°N 80.4538472°W / 25.5670472

Elevation:

10 ft (3 m)

Time Zone:

Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)

Comments:

Aladdin City is an unincorporated community in Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States. It is located about 20 miles (32 km) southwest of Miami within the unincorporated community of Redland. It is notable as the site of a planned community—similar to Opa-locka, Coral Gables, and Miami Springs, Florida—whose development was snuffed out by the abrupt end of the Florida land boom of the 1920s.

Remains:

In late 1925, The Aladdin Company of Bay City, Michigan, a pioneer in the manufacture of mail-order “kit” homes, purchased a large parcel of land in the Redland area. Otto and William Sovereign, the founders of the company, began to build a Moorish-themed city made up primarily of buildings featured in their 1920 industrial catalog. It was planned to have a population of 10,000.

Established:

 

Disestablished:

 

Current Status:

A couple of the Aladdin homes survived over the years, but without the community and the commercial buildings, which remained on the drawing board. The last of these homes reportedly suffered severe damage in Hurricane Andrew in 1992. The wooden train station—unique among Seaboard stations in South Florida, which were routinely constructed out of stucco or concrete—was reported to be still standing as of 1985, but was apparently torn down after suffering damage from Hurricane Andrew.

Remarks:

After forming the Aladdin City Sales Co. in December 1925, the Sovereign brothers promoted the building of a “dawn-to-dusk” house on opening day on January 14, 1926, flying in all of the materials on six chartered aircraft from Fort Lauderdale on that single day. The Homestead Leader reported that hundreds of spectators gathered to watch the aircraft shuttle in the materials and to watch the crew of 21 carpenters, plasters, electricians, plumbers, and cement workers put up the house. Construction of the house commenced at 7:00 a.m., and was finished at dark, complete with electricity, plumbing, sidewalks, and landscaping. A few days later, an advertisement in the Miami News boasted that 874 homesites had been sold on opening day.