Dooley

Name:

Dooley

County:

Sheridan

Zip Code:

 

Latitude / Longitude:

48°52’52N 104°23’22W 104°23’22W

Elevation:

2,461 ft (750 m)

Time Zone:

Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)

Comments:

Dooley is a ghost town in northeastern Sheridan County, Montana, United States. The town was established as a station stop and one of the first four depots along the Soo Line Railroad branch line to Whitetail, Montana.

Remains:

The town began in 1913, when the railroad was coming through and landed on the corner of W.D Dooley’s property. Around 40 buildings went up at once, to become the business area. It was one of the only towns not to move since the beginning of the railroad. George Epler was the town cashier and the organizer of the Citizen State Bank. Guy Clerke and the Epler Brothers had two general stores in town. George Wright owned the hardware store, where they would hold different gatherings upstairs, until the theater was built. The Confectionery and the post office was owned by Peter Hegseth. The post office at Dooley operated from 1914 to 1957. He had to rebuild them after they caught in a fire. There were two saloons in town one owned by Hans Nelson and the other Jim Kings.

Established:

 

Disestablished:

 

Current Status:

Over the years people moved to the surrounding areas due to the fires and infestations. The town’s population slowly dwindled and the buildings were sold or torn down. The elevators were sold to Jim Syme.

Remarks:

Dooley suffered many different kinds of disasters. In May 1916, the west side of Main Street caught on fire, wrecking many of the businesses. Four years later the east side suffered a fire destroying many of the local businesses. Also a year before, in 1919 a smaller fire took place and wrecked a garage and two smaller businesses. In 1934 a tornado came through town, wiping out the Stadig Livery Barn. The town also suffered infestations of armyworms, grasshoppers and Mormon crickets, which harmed local agriculture. Some of the winters that the town faced were very severe and kept the train from passing through. The trains feared that they would freeze up or run out of fuel.