Cardin

Name:

Cardin

County:

Ottawa

Zip Code:

74335

Latitude / Longitude:

36°58′32″N 94°51′6″W / 36.97556°N 94.85167°W / 36.97556

Elevation:

810 ft (247 m)

Time Zone:

Central (CST) (UTC-6)

Comments:

Cardin is a ghost town in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 150 at the 2000 census, but plummeted to 3 at the 2010 census in April 2010. The town is located within the Tar Creek Superfund site; the vast majority of its residents accepted federal buyout offers, and the town’s population dropped to zero in November 2010.

Remains:

The town of Cardin was originally known as Tar Creek, when it was founded as a mining town in 1913. In 1918, William Oscar Cardin, a member of the Quapaw tribe, and his wife, Isa Wade Cardin, had his 40-acre allotment platted and recorded with the county clerk. The town name changed from Tar Creek to Cardin in 1920. There were 2,640 residents in 1920.

Established:

 

Disestablished:

 

Current Status:

The town, along with Picher, and Hockerville, is located within the Tar Creek Superfund site. These towns are part of a $60 million federal buyout because of lead pollution, as well as risk of buildings caving in due to decades of mining. Cardin, Oklahoma, officially closed its last business, the post office, on February 28, 2009. In April 2009, federal officials stated that only seven residences were occupied in Cardin, and that the town’s water service would soon be shut off. This made Cardin the first city within the area to be completely closed down. In November 2010, the last family in Cardin received its final buyout payment from the federally funded Lead-Impacted Communities Relocation Assistance Trust and departed, reducing the town’s population to zero.

Remarks: