Canyon City

Name:

Canyon Valley

County:

Crosby

Zip Code:

 

Latitude / Longitude:

33°24’04″N 101°20’07″W

Elevation:

 

Time Zone:

Central (CST) (UTC-6)

Comments:

Canyon Valley is a ghost town in southern Crosby County, Texas, United States. Canyon Valley is located 25 mi (40 km) south of Ralls in southwestern Crosby County. Only one road passes through Canyon Valley, and it is unpaved and passes through a low-water crossing that is often impassable during wet weather. The nearest paved road is Texas State Highway 207, which passes to the west at a distance around 3 mi (4.8 km).

Remains:

Canyon Valley lies below the Caprock, which defines the southeastern edge of the vast Llano Estacado. It lies within the physiographic region known as the Rolling Plains in the highly eroded valley of the Salt Fork Brazos River. In 1925, James A. Shoemaker brought his family to Crosby County where he bought a quarter-section of land three miles south of the small community of Cap Rock. A three-room house was built on the property while the land was cleared for farming. Water was hauled in barrels by wagon from the Salt Fork Brazos River until a well was dug with hand tools.

Established:

 

Disestablished:

 

Current Status:

Today, it has only a few farms and ranches scattered across the area.

Remarks:

The community grew slowly, but by the early 1930s, Canyon Valley had a cotton gin and a general store. The Valley Gin ginned a total of 2,230 bales of cotton in 1934. In 1953, the Commissioners Court proposed a 5 mi (8.0 km) paved road that would have connected the Valley Gin to the “Ralls and Post Highway” (now known as Texas State Highway 207). Unfortunately, the proposed road was rejected by the district highway engineer. Although a paved road was never completed, two steel pony-truss bridges were constructed to span Lake Creek and another unnamed dry creek that intermittently becomes a tributary of the Salt Fork Brazos River. The lack of a paved road leading to the community limited the growth of Canyon Valley, and in the late 1950s, the Valley Gin shutdown and consolidated with the gin in nearby Kalgary, Texas.