Washington-on-the-Brazos

Name:

Washington-on-the-Brazos

County:

Washington

Zip Code:

 

Latitude / Longitude:

30°19’26.35″N 96°09’12.75″W

Elevation:

 

Time Zone:

Central (CST) (UTC-6)

Comments:

Washington-on-the-Brazos is an unincorporated area along the Brazos River in Washington County, Texas, United States. Founded when Texas was still a part of Mexico, the settlement was the site of the Convention of 1836 and the signing of the Texas Declaration of Independence. The name “Washington-on-the-Brazos” was used to distinguish the settlement from “Washington-on-the-Potomac”—i.e., Washington, D.C.

Remains:

Founded largely by immigrants from the southern United States, Washington-on-the-Brazos is known as “the birthplace of Texas” because it was here that, on March 1, 1836, Texas delegates met to formally announce Texas’ intention to separate from Mexico and to draft the constitution of the new Republic of Texas. They organized an interim government to serve until a government could be elected and inaugurated.

Established:

 

Disestablished:

 

Current Status:

The Barrington Living History Farm is a living museum homestead that represents the mid-19th-century farm founded by Dr. Anson Jones, the last President of the Republic of Texas. Costumed interpreters raise cotton, corn, cattle and hogs using period techniques. The 1844 Anson Jones Home was moved to the site in 1936 as part of the Texas Centennial Celebration. The reconstructed outbuildings include two slave cabins, a kitchen building, a smokehouse, a cotton house and a barn. The farmstead opened in 2000, and is operated by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Remarks:

Located between Brenham and Navasota off State Highway 105, the site is now known as Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic Site. It covers 293 acres (119 ha), and features three main attractions: Independence Hall, Barrington Living History Farm, and the Star of the Republic Museum, which is administered by Blinn College. The site’s visitor center is free and includes interactive exhibits about the Texas Revolution and the park’s attractions, a gift shop, a conference center and an education center.