Oketeyeconne

Name:

Oketeyeconne

County:

Clay

Zip Code:

 

Latitude / Longitude:

31°38’35 N 85°04’50 W

Elevation:

200 ft (60 m)

Time Zone:

Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)

Comments:

Oketeyeconne was an unincorporated community in Clay County, Georgia, United States, which was located along the Chattahoochee River.

Remains:

Following legislation of the late 1940s, the United States Army Corps of Engineers constructed major dam and reservoir projects on the river. The manmade, 46,000-acre Walter F. George Lake was developed north of the dam by the same name. Its construction and flooding required the evacuation of Oketeyeconne and its residents were forced to relocate elsewhere. The lake opened for use in 1963.

Established:

 

Disestablished:

 

Current Status:

The town remained unincorporated. During the mid-twentieth century, it was evacuated when the federal government took it over for development of water control and navigation projects on the river. Following legislation of the late 1940s, the United States Army Corps of Engineers constructed major dam and reservoir projects on the river. The manmade, 46,000-acre Walter F. George Lake was developed north of the dam by the same name. Its construction and flooding required the evacuation of Oketeyeconne. The lake opened for use in 1963.

Remarks:

Archeologists have found evidence that earlier cultures of indigenous peoples have lived along the river since 1000 BC. Oketeyeconne was known historically as a Hitchiti-speaking town of the Lower Creek Indians in the late 1700s. It was the most southern of major towns affiliated with the Lower Creek, who ranged to the north. To the south were the Sawokli, Tamathli, Apalachicola, Yamasee, Mikasuki, and Seminole peoples. In 1799 Benjamin Hawkins, the United States Superintendent for Indian Affairs south of the Ohio River, described the settlement as being “a nice town settled on good land with room for livestock”.  He was encouraging Native Americans of the Southeast to adopt European-American farming techniques, and lived among the Creek.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *