Ghost Towns of California (K-L)

Ghost Towns Of California, United States Ghost Towns

Kasson

County: Inyo
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Kasson is a former settlement in Inyo County, California. It was located 12 miles (19 km) northwest of the original site of Tecopa. A post office operated at Kasson for a period during 1879. The name Kasson honors Amasa C. Kasson, an investor in the site.
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Kern River Slough

County: Kern
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35° 15′ 35″ N, 118° 58′ 3″ W
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Kern River Slough is a former settlement in Kern County, California. It was located on the Kern River Slough, a distributary of the Kern River, in the San Joaquin Valley. The site is 3 miles (4.8 km) west of Lamont.
Remains: Kern River Slough Station was a stagecoach stop on the Butterfield Overland Mail 1st Division route from 1858 to 1861. The Butterfield Overland Mail (1857-1861) site is now registered California Historical Landmark #588.
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Kernvale

County: Kern
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Kernvale is a former settlement in Kern County, California. It was located 1.25 miles (2 km) south-southwest of Lake Isabella.
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Kernville

County: Kern
Zip Code: 93238
Latitude / Longitude: 35°42′51″N 118°26′12″W / 35.71417°N 118.43667°W / 35.71417
Elevation: 2,667 ft (813 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Kernville is a census-designated place (CDP) in the southern Sierra Nevada, in Kern County, California, United States. Kernville is located 42 miles (68 km) northeast of Bakersfield, at an elevation of 2,667 ft (813 m). The Kern River was named after artist and topographer Edward Kern, who accompanied John C. Fremont on his 1845 expedition. They camped at what was a fork of two rivers, now the middle of Lake Isabella. An 1858 gold rush led to the formation of a town briefly called Rogersville, then Williamsburg, which was in 1863 renamed Whiskey Flat after a bar opened. In 1864, the town was renamed Kernville.
Remains: After decades of planning, the Isabella Dam project began in 1948. As a result, Kernville was relocated upstream to its present location at the tip of the northeast fork of the man-made lake, along with certain historic buildings. Downtown visibly retains Kernville’s gold rush and Old West roots, attracting tourists along with the area’s natural scenery and outdoor activities. The town’s original location is slightly east of Wofford Heights. Foundations and other remnants can still be seen when the lake is low. The famous Mountain Inn, built mainly to house movie stars and crew before the 1948 move, is now (partially) at the new Kernville, renamed the River View Lodge.
Current Status: The population was 1,395 at the 2010 census, down from 1,736 at the 2000 census.
Remarks: Even with its annual summer influx of tourists, Kernville remains one of the most quaint, conservative relics of early California. Many local families trace their lineage to original 19th-century homesteaders, and the area’s newspaper, The Kern River Courier, is delivered weekly by a horse-drawn carriage. The post office, established at the original site in 1868, was moved to the new site in 1951.

Kearsarge

County: Inyo
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°48′36″N 118°19′30″W / 36.81000°N 118.32500°W / 36.81000
Elevation: 3,770 ft (1,149 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Kearsarge (formerly, Kearsarge Station and Citrus) is an unincorporated community in Inyo County, California. It is located on the Southern Pacific Railroad 4.5 miles (7.2 km) east of Independence, at an elevation of 3,770 ft (1,150 m). Citrus post office operated from 1888 to 1905 and from 1907 to 1910.
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Keeler

County: Inyo
Zip Code: 93530
Latitude / Longitude: 36°29′14″N 117°52′26″W / 36.48722°N 117.87389°W / 36.48722
Elevation: 3,602 ft (1,098 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Keeler, formerly known as Hawley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Inyo County, California, United States. Keeler is located on the east shore of Owens Lake 11.5 miles (19 km) south-southeast of New York Butte, at an elevation of 3602 ft (1098 m).
Remains: When the 1872 Lone Pine earthquake rendered the pier in nearby Swansea inaccessible by uplifting the shoreline, a new pier was constructed to the south at a community named Hawley. In 1880 a new mill was constructed at Hawley by the Owens Lake Mining and Milling Company for processing ore from the Cerro Gordo Mines in the mountains to the east. A town was laid out by the company agent Julius M. Keeler, for whom the town of Hawley was later renamed.
Current Status: The population was 66 people at the 2010 census, unchanged from the 2000 census.
Remarks: The second boom of zinc mining in the early 1900s brought new life to the town and a tramway was built to bring the ore from Cerro Gordo to Keeler. There were small surges in the mining of silver, lead, zinc, and limestone; however, by the 1950s all mining had ceased. Train service was stopped in 1960 and the tracks were removed in 1961. Water exports from the Owens Valley to the City of Los Angeles in the 1920s led the Owens Lake to eventually dry up, causing alkali dust storms to blow through Keeler, driving many residents away. Dust remediation efforts in the early 21st century reduced this problem, but few residents remain.

Kelso

County: San Bernardino
Zip Code: 92309
Latitude / Longitude: 35°0′45″N 115°39′13″W / 35.01250°N 115.65361°W / 35.01250
Elevation: 2,126 ft (648 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Kelso is a ghost town and defunct railroad depot in the Mojave National Preserve in San Bernardino County, California, USA. It was named after railroad worker John H. Kelso, whose name was placed into a hat along with two other workers to decide the name of the town. The town was built in 1905 specifically as a railroad station along the rail line between Utah and Los Angeles, originally called “Siding 16,” because of its location and nearby springs that provided abundant water.
Remains: Starting off as what was a simple train depot in the 1920s, the town of Kelso boomed briefly to as many as 2000 residents in the 1940s, when borax and iron mines opened nearby. Gold and silver were also discovered in the nearby hills of what became known as the Kelso district. The town shrank again when the mines closed after about a decade.
Current Status: The depot remained in operation until 1986. Left to the harsh conditions in the desert, the building began to deteriorate. By the mid-1990s the railroad was on the verge of demolishing the depot. Preservationists then stepped in to save it. It was recently renovated to become the Mojave National Preserve’s visitor center. The renovation was completed in 2005 and the depot is now open to the public. During the 1970s Kelso was known as the town without television. About 75 residents lived in Kelso, many with school-age children. Television signals could not reach the town which meant that residents found other methods of recreation. However, with the advent of satellite dishes, television was eventually introduced to Kelso.
Remarks: Kelso was a base of operations for the San Pedro, Los Angeles, and Salt Lake Railroad, connecting track of Union Pacific Railroad, to which the SPLA&SL had negotiated trackage rights, with the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway east-west line to the south. Here, trains were watered and “helper” locomotives were attached to assist the regular trains in climbing the steep Cima Hill. The distance between Las Vegas and the connection with the Santa Fe line at Daggett was too far for trains without a meal car, so Kelso was a convenient spot for a restaurant stop.

Kingston

County: Kings
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°25’24.71″N 119°41’37.9″W
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Kingston is a former town that is no longer in existence. Originally in Fresno County, until 1909 when Fresno County lands in the vicinity, south of Kings river were transferred to Kings County, California. It was located on the south bank of the Kings River 8.5 miles (13.7 km) northwest of Hanford at Whitmore’s Ferry.
Remains: L. A. Whitmore established the ferry in 1854. It was founded in 1856 by Lucious A. Whitmore who operated the first ferry to cross the Kings River. The town of Kingston grew up around the ferry at the place where an old Spanish road called El Camino Viejo á Los Angeles (The Old Road to Los Angeles) crossed the river. Kingston became a stopping place on the Butterfield Overland Mail route from 1858 to 1861 and a stage route between Stockton and Visalia after 1858. A post office operated at Kingston from 1859 to 1862, and from 1866 to 1890, when the service transferred to Lillis. Until at least 1872, the only store between Millerton and Visalia was in Kingston. The first school in the area was probably the one established as early as 1860 in Kingston.
Current Status: On December 26, 1873, Tiburcio Vásquez and his bandit gang made a bold raid, robbing the entire village. Reportedly 35 or more men were tied up and over $2,000 in loot was hauled away. Subsequently, the town declined and by the 1890s Kingston was abandoned. Oliver Bliss’ livery stable was the last remaining building and stood until 1930.
Remarks: Oliver H. Bliss operated the Kingston ferry after Whitmore, beginning in 1859. Bliss built a temporary toll bridge with two boats and planking in 1872. In 1873, John Sutherland purchased Bliss’s interest in both the ferry and the bridge and built a permanent bridge that year. The site of the town is now a California Historical Landmark (#270), which can be found in Kingston-Laton County Park in Kings County.

Kocher

County: Mariposa
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Kocher is a former settlement in Mariposa County, California. It was located on the former Yosemite Valley Railroad, 8 miles (13 km) upstream on the Merced River from Bagby.
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Kumaini

County: Mariposa
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Kumaini (also, Coomine and Ku-mai-ni) is a former Awani settlement in Mariposa County, California. It was located at the lower end of Great Meadow in Yosemite Valley, approximately 0.25 miles (0.4 km) from Yosemite Falls.
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Kyan

County: Kern
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°07′31″N 119°15′45″W / 35.12528°N 119.26250°W / 35.12528 -119.26250
Elevation: 335 ft (102 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Kyan is a former settlement in Kern County, California. It was located on the Sunset Railroad 11.5 miles (19 km) east of Taft, at an elevation of 335 ft (102 m). Kyan still appeared on maps as of 1932.
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Lane Mill

County: Inyo
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°16′55″N 117°34′15″W / 36.28194°N 117.57083°W / 36.28194 -117.57083
Elevation: 4,363 ft (1,330 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Lane Mill is a former settlement in Inyo County, California. It lay at an elevation of 4363 ft (1330 m), northeast of Darwin, California.
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La Panza

County: San Luis Obispo
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Latitude / Longitude: 35° 21′ 40″ N, 120° 12′ 56″ W
Elevation: 1,880 ft (573 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: La Panza, a populated place, formerly a gold boom town, in San Luis Obispo County, California. It lies in the La Panza Range at an elevation of 1880 ft (573m). La Panza derives from a Spanish word for paunch of beef, that Californio hunters used to lure bears. The location was recorded in 1828, with the name paraje la panza (the paunch place).
Remains: The discovery of placer gold in La Panza Canyon in 1878 began a small gold rush and La Panza grew into a gold mining boomtown. It had its own post office from November 4, 1879, to June 15, 1908.
Current Status: One dilapidated building remains at the site, on private property, and can be seen from the Pozo Road. Placer gold mining and quartz mining claims are still worked in the vicinity.
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La Rose

County: Kern
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°06′15″N 118°16′18″W / 35.10417°N 118.27167°W / 35.10417 -118.27167
Elevation: 3,766 ft (1,148 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: La Rose is a former settlement in Kern County, California. It was located on the Southern Pacific Railroad 3 miles (4.8 km) northwest of Mojave, at an elevation of 3766 ft (1148 m). La Rose still appeared on maps as of 1947
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Langdon

County: Kern
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Langdon is a former settlement in Kern County, California. It was located 16 miles (26 km) southeast of Bakersfield. A post office operated at Langdon from 1898 to 1900.
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Lavers’ Crossing

County: Kern
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Latitude / Longitude: 35°44’12″N 118°43’16″W
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Lavers’ Crossing is a former settlement in Kern County, California. It was located 1 mile (1.6 km) west-northwest of Glennville.
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Current Status: The town was founded by David Lavers, who settled there in 1858. For the following decade, Lavers’ Crossing was the trading center for the surrounding valley before being supplanted in that role by Glennville. The site is now registered as California Historical Landmark #672.
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Leadfield

County: Inyo
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°50′48″N 117°03′33″W / 36.84667°N 117.05917°W / 36.84667 -117.05917
Elevation: 4,058 ft (1,237 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Leadfield was an unincorporated community, and historic mining town in Inyo County, California. It is now a ghost town. It is located in Titus Canyon in the Grapevine Mountains, east of Death Valley in Death Valley National Park. Leadfield lies at an elevation of 4,058 ft (1,237 m). It is on the National Register of Historic Places.
Remains: Ore was being exploited in Titus Canyon as early as 1905, but the townsite of Leadfield at the head of the canyon dates to the years 1925 and 1926. The product of extensive and fraudulent advertising by the Western Lead Mine Company and C.C. Julian, the town boomed in 1925. His advertising posters showed steamboats navigating the Amargosa River to Leadfield, ignoring the fact that the Amargosa River is dry much of the time and does not run within 20 miles of Leadfield.
Current Status: The remains of the town include a few rusted metal sheds and two locked, abandoned mine shafts, as of 2005. The town is reachable by one-way Titus Canyon Road at the eastern end of Titus Canyon, near Beatty, Nevada.
Remarks: Fifteen miles of road were built up the canyon to connect with the road to Beatty, Nevada, a concrete foundation for a stamp mill was poured, and the beginning of a series of power poles for electric lines was installed. Historic photographs show some frame and corrugated metal buildings and there is evidence of a few dugouts, but the majority of the denizens of Leadfield lived in tents of varying sizes and construction. The population peaked at around 300 in 1926, with a post office opening in August of that year. However, by February 1927, the post office closed down and the town died. Julian disappeared and the inhabitants soon became disillusioned and quickly drifted away. The significance of the site lies in the fact it was an example of one of the get-rich-quick schemes of the wild 1920s.

Lee

County: Inyo
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Lee (also, Lees Camp) is a former settlement in Inyo County, California. It was located near the Nevada state line, 15 miles (24 km) east of Beatty Junction. A post office operated at Lee from 1907 to 1912. First postmaster was John H. Lawrence The name honors Richard and Gus Lee, who discovered gold at the site.
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Lee Camp

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Leliter

County: Kern
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°42′38″N 117°49′49″W / 35.71056°N 117.83028°W / 35.71056 -117.83028
Elevation: 2,303 ft (702 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Leliter (also, Muerto) is a former settlement in Kern County, California. It was located on the Southern Pacific Railroad 4.5 miles (7.2 km) north-northwest of Inyokern, at an elevation of 2303 ft (702 m). Leliter still appeared on maps as of 1943. A post office operated at Leliter from 1910 to 1927.
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Leon

County: San Diego
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 33° 38′ 29″ N, 117° 6′ 49″ W
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Leon now a ghost town, was a gold mining town in northern San Diego County from the 1880s, named for the Leon Mine that lay on a hill to the northwest of the town. Leon became part of southwestern Riverside County in 1893. Leon had its own post office from May 4, 1888, until July 31, 1911, when its post office was moved to Perris, California.
Remains: The site of the former mining town is located south of Winchester in the Domenigoni Valley, on Scott Road just east of Leon Road.
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Leonards

County: Kern
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°33′02″N 119°24′11″W / 35.55056°N 119.40306°W / 35.55056 -119.40306
Elevation: 295 ft (90 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Leonards is a former settlement in Kern County, California. It was located 5 miles (8 km) southwest of Wasco, at an elevation of 295 ft (90 m). Leonards still appeared on maps as of 1947.
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Levee

County: Kern
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°10′30″N 119°14′06″W / 35.17500°N 119.23500°W / 35.17500 -119.23500
Elevation: 289 ft (88 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Levee is a former settlement in Kern County, California. It was located on the Sunset Railroad 1.5 miles (2.4 km) north of Levee Spur, at an elevation of 289 ft (88 m). Levee still appeared on maps as of 1933.
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Levee Spur

County: Kern
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Levee Spur is a former settlement in Kern County, California. It was located on the Sunset Railroad 3 miles (4.8 km) northwest of Millux.
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Lexington

County: Santa Clara
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 37°11′47″N 121°59′18″W / 37.19639°N 121.98833°W / 37.19639
Elevation: 623 ft (190 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Lexington, California, is a ghost town in Santa Clara County, now submerged by the Lexington Reservoir. Originally located along Los Gatos Creek, the town was 550 ft above sea level.
Remains: Lexington started out as a sawmill built in 1848 by Isaac Branham and Julian Jank. Zachariah “Buffalo” Jones bought the mill for $3000 and laid out a town called “Jones Mill”. In 1860 John P. Hennings bought some of the property and changed the name to Lexington, after his hometown of Lexington, Kentucky.
Current Status: The railroad ceased operations in March 1940, following major damage by a winter storm and the completion of State Route 17 that same year. When the Lexington Reservoir was created in 1952, both Lexington and Alma were officially abandoned and SR 17 was rerouted to its present location. The visible ruins under Lexington Reservoir are actually those of Alma, not Lexington; building foundations and original pavements of roads are sometimes visible during droughts.
Remarks: The nearby unincorporated town of Lexington Hills is a reminder of the former town; it combines several villages in the Santa Cruz Mountains. The Lexington Murders was one of the most notable crimes in California during the 19th century. Three men were responsible for the brutal murders of William Peter Renowden and Archibald McIntyre in Lexington, on March 11, 1883.

Linda Rosa

County: Riverside
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Latitude / Longitude: 33° 31′ 45″ N, 117° 10′ 31″ W
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Linda Rosa, or Linda Rose, is a former populated place, formerly in San Diego County, now in Riverside County, California. The townsite of Linda Rosa was located southwest of the old town of Murrieta, California on the west side of Murrieta Creek. Linda Rosa is a name derived from Spanish meaning “pretty rose”.
Remains: Linda Rosa was one of the many land development schemes of the 1880s in Southern California. In 1887, the Santa Rosa Land & Improvement Company, belonging to the Englishman, Parker Dear, owner of the Rancho Santa Rosa subdivided the 400-acre Linda Rosa Tract southwest of Murrieta along the California Southern Railroad line. The company spent approximately $5,000 building a depot, but the railroad did not make Linda Rosa a scheduled stop. The Linda Rosa Hotel was built by the land company in 1888 at an estimated cost of $15,000. The large hotel provided a place where visitors and land buyers could stay.
Current Status: Linda Rosa Fruit Canning and Preserving Company was formed on June 30, 1888, to grow and can fruit and vegetables. Linda Rosa had its own post office, Linda Rose, from November 20, 1888, to March 20, 1890. When the land boom went bust, the town lots failed to sell and the office was closed and mail service was moved to Temecula Station. The hotel was torn down and used to build a house. With the failure of his development, Parker Dear went bankrupt and lost the rancho to his bank in 1893.
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Lila C

County: Inyo
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°14′36″N 116°29′56″W / 36.24333°N 116.49889°W / 36.24333 -116.49889
Elevation: 2,562 ft (781 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Lila C (also known as Ryan or Old Ryan) is a former settlement in Inyo County, California. It was located 6.25 miles (10 km) southwest of Death Valley Junction, at an elevation of 2562 ft (781 m).
Remains: The settlement was connected by rail to the Lila C Mine, which produced Colemanite for the Pacific Coast Borax Company, from which it got its name. The property was named by its owner William Tell Coleman, for his daughter, Lila C. Coleman. Francis Marion Smith subsequently obtained the property and started the first borax operations there in 1907. Production began several months before the Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad had reached the mine, and mule teams were used to cover the remaining distance until the railroad arrived. The name was also changed to Ryan at that time, in honor of John Ryan, “Borax” Smith’s trusted supervisor.
Current Status: The Ryan post office was opened here in 1907, and transferred to (new) Ryan in 1914. After that, Lila C was then also known as “Old Ryan.”
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Little Dixie

County: Kern
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°29′43″N 118°00′07″W / 35.49528°N 118.00194°W / 35.49528 -118.00194
Elevation: 3,274 ft (998 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Little Dixie is a former settlement in Kern County, California. It was located on Little Dixie Wash 17 miles (27 km) north-northeast of Cross Mountain, at an elevation of 3274 ft (998 m). Little Dixie still appeared on maps as of 1915.
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Llano del Rio

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Latitude / Longitude: 34°30’23.3″N 117°49’37.5″W
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Lone Pine Station

County: Inyo
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36° 37′ 4.76″ N, 118° 2′ 26.32″ W
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Lone Pine Station (also, Mount Whitney and Whitney) is a former settlement in Inyo County, California. It was initially located on the Carson and Colorado Railroad 3 miles (4.8 km) east-northeast of Lone Pine. Later the Southern Pacific Railroad was built on the place.
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Lookout City

County: Inyo
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°14′45″N 117°26′05″W / 36.24583°N 117.43472°W / 36.24583 -117.43472
Elevation: 3,579 ft (1,091 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Lookout City is a former settlement in the Mojave Desert, in Inyo County, California. It lay at an elevation of 3579 ft (1091 m).
Remains: In 1875 rich deposits of silver-lead ore were discovered in the Argus Range on top of Lookout mountain. The discovery was named the Modoc and was sold to a group of investors which included George Hearst, the famed mining engineer, U.S. Senator, and father of William Randolph Hearst. (He was also the great-great-grandfather of Patty Hearst.) The Modoc Consolidated Mining Company was formed with the Modoc mine as the principal mine. Together with the discovery of other nearby mines, which included the Minnietta Belle below Lookout Mountain, these mines formed the basis for the Modoc District with the townsite of Lookout located on top of Lookout Mountain.
Current Status: The town of Lookout consisted of 2 general stores, 3 saloons, company offices, and as many as 30 other woods and stone structures. By 1876 two 60 ton furnaces and a 10-stamp mill were running and production was quoted as running 160 silver-lead bars per day. The bars averaged 90 lbs. each and assayed around $400.00. By the end of 1876, Remi Nadeau’s Cerro Gordo Freighting Company had hauled 10,000 bars worth some $4,000,000 over the Bullion Trail which was originally built for the ore of the Cerro Gordo Mines. Remi Nadeau needed a faster route for his teams, so he constructed the Nadeau “Shotgun” road across the Panamint Valley and over the Slate Range to meet the Bullion Trail south of China Lake.
Remarks: To supply the furnaces with charcoal, 10 charcoal kilns were built in Wildrose Canyon 25 miles away in the Panamint Range, and a steady stream of burros delivered charcoal in sacks to Lookout City via a pack trail on the east side of Lookout Mountain. The U.S. Bureau of Mines reported that total production during the period 1875 through 1890 amounted to $1,900,000 from the Modoc Mine alone.

Lower Calaveritas

County: Calaveras
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Lower Calaveritas is a former settlement and waystation in Calaveras County, 3.5 miles (5.6 km) west of Calaveritas, then called Upper Calaveritas to distinguish it from Lower Calaveritas.
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Ludlow

County: San Bernardino
Zip Code: 92338
Latitude / Longitude: 34°43’16″N 116°09’36″W
Elevation: 1,778 ft (542 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
Established: 1883
Disestablished:
Comments: Ludlow is an unincorporated community in the Mojave Desert on Interstate 40, located in San Bernardino County, California, United States. The older remains of the ghost town are along historic Route 66.
Remains: The town started as a water stop for the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad in 1883. Ore was found in the nearby hills, leading to a boom. From 1906 to 1940 it was the southern railhead for the Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad, operated by the Pacific Coast Borax Company and bringing borax and other mining products from Death Valley and Beatty, Nevada to long-distance Santa Fe Railway lines. It also served as the northern railhead for the Ludlow and Southern Railway, a mining line that ran south to the Bagdad-Chase gold mine and the mining camp of Rochester. It operated from 1903 to 1931.
Current Status: By the 1940s, local mining and railway activity had ceased and the town survived supplying the needs of travelers on the National Old Trails Road, renamed to become the legendary Route 66 in California. Ludlow providing a Motor Court with bungalow cabins, the streamlined modern Ludlow Cafe, a gasoline-service garage, and shade. They operated through the late 1960s. After Interstate 40 was built bypassing town there was little business and most residents departed, leaving ruins of empty buildings and Tamarisk trees that sill stand flanking the old highway. Tourists following and exploring historic Route 66 pass through the ghost town now.
Remarks: A small “New Ludlow” just to the north at the off-ramps of Interstate 40 was built in the 1970s and contains two gas stations and a small tire and repair shop, a small motel, and a restaurant and fast-food café. On January 25, 2014, a truck carrying 76,000 pounds (34,000 kg) of beef ribs caught fire on Interstate 40, blocking westbound traffic for two hours. A San Bernardino County Fire spokesman stated that the fire had “a wonderful BBQ beef rib odor.”

Lyons Station

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Latitude / Longitude: 34.36270°N 118.50740°W
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Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Disestablished:
Comments: The Lyons Station Stagecoach Stop, (originally Hart’s Station, then Wiley’s Station), was a tavern and stagecoach stop near the southwest corner of Newhall Avenue and Sierra Highway, by Eternal Valley Cemetery. The site is located in the present-day Newhall section of Santa Clarita, in Los Angeles County, California.
Remains: The original Hart’s Station house was just north over the San Fernando Pass on the Fort Tejon Road, north of the San Fernando Mission. The wagon road connected Los Angeles and the Gold Rush locations in the Sierras and was part of the inland route to Sacramento and the San Francisco Bay Area. It was a regular stop for several early California stagecoach lines and accommodated travelers during the 1853 Kern River gold rush.
Current Status: Wiley’s Station was purchased by Sanford and Cyrus Lyon in 1855, and it was renamed Lyons’ Station. The Lyon brothers owned the adobe and ranch land around it, where they farmed, raised sheep, and ran the watering-place stop. Despite being named Lyons’ Station by the Lyon brothers as owners, it was still referred to by its original name of Hart’s Station in Daily Alta California news accounts of the first trip over the route in 1858. The sixth was Willow Springs Station, in the Temecula Valley.
Remarks: Over the years Lyons’ Station became a combination stagecoach stop, general store, and post office, with a telegraph office, added after the telegraph line came to Los Angeles in 1861. By 1860 at least twenty families lived in the surrounding settlement. The site of Lyons Station is marked by California Historical Marker NO. 688, sited in front of the Eternal Valley Memorial Park at 23287 North Sierra Highway in Newhall, near California State Route 14 and Newhall Avenue.

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