Ghost Towns of Alaska

Alaska State Flag

Afognak

County: Kodiak Island Borough
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 58°00′28″N 152°46′05″W / 58.00778°N 152.76806°W / 58.00778
Elevation:
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established: 5,500 B.C.
Disestablished: March 27, 1964 (Good Friday earthquake)
Comments: For more than 7,500 years, the Alutiiq people lived in hundreds of settlements in the Kodiak Archipelago. Like most other early native Alaskan peoples, the people of Afognak fished and hunted sea mammals from kayaks covered in seal skin. Men and women performed different tasks for the village. The people of Afognak traded services and goods with other settlements in Southeast Alaska and the Aleutian chain.
Remains: Afognak was covered by one meter (3 ft) of ash when Mount Katmai erupted in 1912
Current Status:
Remarks: Named by Russian settlers; derived from Afognak Island in 1839. The U.S. bought the occupation rights in 1867.

Cape York

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 65° 29′ 38.4 N, 167° 41′ 2.4 W
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Chena

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 64° 47′ 44 N, 147° 57′ 6 W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: The area is now part of the outskirts of Fairbanks. The town was fairly prosperous for a time, and even had its own newspaper, the Tanana Miner, which later was purchased by the Fairbanks Daily News (now the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner), running concurrently with it for a time. Other businesses included two hotels, two general stores, a bakery, a laundry, and two restaurants. By 1910, Chena had a police department, a public school, churches, and a fire department. By 1915, however, the population had dropped to 50. With the death of the town’s last business owner, grocer Harry Beldon
Remains: In 1920, the population had dropped to only 18. The town gradually faded away, resurging in modern times as a suburb of Fairbanks.
Current Status: By 1910 the population had fallen to 138
Remarks: Chena was a small town in interior Alaska near the confluence of the Chena and Tanana rivers whose heyday was in the first two decades of the 20th century, with a peak population of about 400 in 1907.

Chisana

County: Valdez-Cordova Census Area
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 62°4′16″N 141°59′36″W / 62.07111°N 141.99333°W / 62.07111 -141.99333
Elevation: 3,369 ft (1,027 m)
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 86.7 square miles (225 km2), of which 86.7 square miles (225 km2) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) of it is water. The total area is 0.10% water. Chisana is the highest community in Alaska at 3,318 feet (1,011.3 meters) above sea level. Chisana first appeared on the 1920 U.S. Census as an unincorporated community. It appeared twice more in 1930 and 1940. It would not appear again until 2000, when it was made a census-designated place (CDP). However, in both 2000 and 2010, it reported no residents.
Remains:
Current Status: Chisana (also Shushanna) (Tsetsaan’ Na’ in Ahtna) is a ghost town abandoned and a census-designated place (CDP) in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska.
Remarks: In 1985, the community was listed as Chisana Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places as a historic district.

Council

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 64°53′42″N 163°40′35″W / 64.89500°N 163.67639°W / 64.89500 -163.67639
Elevation:
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established: 1897
Disestablished:
Comments: Council was built in 1897 and 1898 when gold was discovered near the Ophir Creek. Council may have had as many as 15,000 inhabitants during those years. The residents left to work larger discoveries of gold near Nome around 1900. Council has about 25 old buildings and much old mining equipment, including a dredge, laying about. During the summer, Council is used as a fish camp and a recreational location for residents of Nome and White Mountain.
Remains:
Current Status: Council is an abandoned townsite in the Nome Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. It has a population of zero as of the 2000 and 2010 U.S. Censuses.
Remarks: Council first appeared on the 1910 U.S. Census as Council City, although it was an unincorporated village. In 1920, the name was shortened to Council. It did not appear on the 1930 census, but returned again in 1940 and 1950. It did not appear again until 1990 when it was classified an Alaska Native Village Statistical Area (ANVSA). It has reported a population of zero in 2000 and 2010.

Curry

County: Matanuska-Susitna Borough
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 62°36′53″N 150°00′43″W / 62.61472°N 150.01194°W / 62.61472
Elevation: 554 ft (169 m)
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: The old townsite of Curry is now an uninhabited stop along the Alaska Railroad, about 22 miles north of Talkeetna. In 1922, this remote train station in the Alaska wilderness became a briefly popular luxury resort destination. Located halfway between Seward and Fairbanks and alongside the Sustina River, Curry was billed “a wilderness palace” when the Railroad opened the first hotel in 1923. Curry was the perfect overnight stop for rail passengers, and with the hotel and renowned fishing, became a destination spot of its own. The little town blossomed, and the resort became more popular as it expanded to include a golf course, a suspension bridge, and boasted magnificent views of Mount Denali.
Remains:
Current Status: Curry first appeared on the 1930 U.S. Census as an unincorporated village. It appeared just twice more in 1940 and 1950.
Remarks: Curry was plagued by a series of unfortunate events leading to its ultimate demise. A fire in 1926 destroyed the engine house and power plant. The engine house was again destroyed by fire in 1933. The construction of a larger hotel in Denali National Park in 1939 drew visitors away from Curry, but the Railroad continued investing in the town, housing employees there in 1945. Disaster came again in the way of a boiler explosion in 1946, completely destroying the power plant. Curry rebuilt, and added a ski area, which would be popular for years to come. The final disaster, however, was a fire in April 1957, in which fire burned down the town’s lifeblood, the 75-room hotel. Three people were killed in the blaze. The hotel was never rebuilt, and Curry faded away.

Dickson

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 64° 33′ 20 N, 164° 24′ 53 W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established: 1903
Disestablished:
Comments: Dickson was a settlement in the U.S. state of Alaska. Situated in the Nome Census Area on the Seward Peninsula, it was located directly opposite Solomon, on the east bank of the Solomon River. It was the coastal terminus of the Council City and Solomon River Railroad. All of its industries and inhabitants were connected with the railroad. Established in 1903, it was named for T. Warren Dickson, general manager of the Western Alaska Construction Company, which built the railroad.
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Current Status:
Remarks: By 1910, its population was approximately 50 residents.

Dyea

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Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 59°30′16″N 135°21′36″W / 59.50444°N 135.36000°W / 59.50444 -135.36000
Elevation:
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Comments: Dyea (/daɪˈiː/ dye-EE) is a former town in the U.S. state of Alaska. A few people live on individual small homesteads in the valley; however, it is largely abandoned. It is located at the convergence of the Taiya River and Taiya Inlet on the south side of the Chilkoot Pass within the limits of the Municipality of Skagway Borough, Alaska. During the Klondike Gold Rush prospectors disembarked at its port and used the Chilkoot Trail, a Tlingit trade route over the Coast Mountains, to begin their journey to the gold fields around Dawson City, Yukon, about 800 km (500 mi) away. Confidence man and crime boss Soapy Smith, famous for his underworld control of the neighboring town of Skagway in 1897–98 is believed to have had control of Dyea as well. Chilkoot Trail and Dyea Site is a U.S. National Historic Landmark.
Remains: The port at Dyea had shallow water, while neighboring Skagway had deep water. Dyea was abandoned when the White Pass and Yukon Route railroad chose the White Pass Trail (instead of the alternative Chilkoot Trail), which began at Skagway, for its route. Dyea is now within the Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park. All that remains are a number of foundations surrounded by scraps of lumber and metal, 3 cemeteries, including one where almost every person buried died on the same date in an avalanche on the gold rush trail, and the ruins of the wharf. Visitors can usually spot brown bears, black bears, caribou, and eagles. Brown bears tend to use the Dyea inlets to feed during salmon spawning season (July–August).
Current Status: Former town, largely abandoned
Remarks: Dyea appeared one time on the U.S. Census in 1900 as an unincorporated village. It has since been annexed into the city of Skagway.

Flat

County: Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area
Zip Code: 99584
Latitude / Longitude: 62°27′15″N 158°0′30″W / 62.45417°N 158.00833°W / 62.45417
Elevation: 292 ft (89 m)
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Prospectors John Beaton and W.A. Dikeman discovered gold on Otter Creek on 25 December 1908. News of the discovery spread slowly, but some miners arrived in the summer of 1909 and built a small camp they called Flat City. More gold was discovered on nearby Flat Creek and more miners arrived in 1910.[2] Beaton, Peter Miscovich, Lars Ostnes, and David Strandberg were prominent early arrivals who mined successfully long after the initial “boomtown” faded. By 1914, the community had grown to about 6,000 people, complete with an elementary school, a telephone system, two stores, a hotel, restaurant, pool hall, laundry and jail. However, by 1930, the population had declined to 124. No plat was filed for Flat, and the town site rests on mining claims, so the existence of Flat may contravene the law, but the U.S. Post Office acknowledged the community and served its few residents with an office until the year 2000.
Remains: Flat is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska, United States. As of the 2010 Census, the population of the CDP was 0. Its post office closed in January 2004
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Gilmore

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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Comments: Between 1986 and 2000, the primary year-round residents were a family of five who worked together to maintain the area in the winter for mining in the summer.
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Iditarod

County: Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 62°32′40″N 158°05′43″W / 62.54444°N 158.09528°W / 62.54444
Elevation:
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: The town of Iditarod was named after the Iditarod River. Iditarod comes from the Athabascan word Haidilatna. On Christmas Day 1908, prospectors John Beaton and W.A. “Bill” Dikeman found gold on Otter Creek, a tributary to the Iditarod River. News of the find spread, and in the summer of 1909 miners arrived in the gold fields and built a small camp that was later known as Flat. People and supplies traveled to the gold fields by boat from the Yukon River, up the Innoko River, and up the Iditarod River to the current town site, a short walk from Flat. More gold was discovered, and a massive stampede headed for Flat in 1910.
Remains:
Current Status: Iditarod is an abandoned town in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska.
Remarks: By 1930 the gold was gone and most of the miners had moved to Flat, taking many of the buildings with them. Iditarod is now a ghost town. Only one cabin and a handful of ruins remain, including the concrete bank vault from the Miners and Merchants Bank. There is no remnant of the bank structure.

Independence Mine

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Latitude / Longitude: 61°47’25N 149°17’05W
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established: 1934
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Kalakaket

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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Katalla

County: Valdez-Cordova Census Area
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 60°11′50″N 144°31′06″W / 60.19722°N 144.51833°W / 60.19722 -144.51833
Elevation:
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Katalla was at the center of the now-abandoned Katalla oil field. This was the first discovery of commercial quantities of oil in Alaska (1902). The town reportedly had a population of 5,000 in 1907-1908. This was the result of the announcement that the Copper River and Northwestern Railway (CR&NW) was going to use the town’s location as its access to the Pacific Ocean and the Bering River coal fields. Violent storms in the fall of 1907 destroyed the jetty being built and it was decided to move the railroad’s terminus to nearby Cordova.
Remains:
Current Status: Katalla (pronounced KA-tell-ah) is a ghost town in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska, 76 km (47 mi) southeast of Cordova. The name of this town was sometimes spelled Catalla. It is now abandoned.
Remarks:

Kennicott

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 61°29′10″N 142°53′19″W / 61.48611°N 142.88861°W / 61.48611
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Comments: In the summer of 1900, two prospectors, “Tarantula” Jack Smith and Clarence L. Warner, a group of prospectors associated with the McClellan party, spotted “a green patch far above them in an improbable location for a grass-green meadow.” The green turned out to be malachite, located with chalcocite (aka “copper glance”), and the location of the Bonanza claim. A few days later, Arthur Coe Spencer, U.S. Geological Survey geologist independently found chalcocite at the same location
Remains:
Current Status: Kennecott, also known as Kennicott and Kennecott Mines, is an abandoned mining camp in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska that was the center of activity for several copper mines. It is located beside the Kennicott Glacier, northeast of Valdez, inside Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The camp and mines are now a National Historic Landmark District administered by the National Park Service.
Remarks: It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1986.

Kern

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Latitude / Longitude: 60° 54′ 25 N, 149° 4′ 41 W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Comments: Many streams in the area were probably prospected. It was a terminus of the Alaska Railroad. In 1964, the town was destroyed by a tsunami after a magnitude 9.2 earthquake occurred in the Pacific Ocean. It is possible that most of the surviving buildings were knocked down due to safety concerns, though a few cabins probably remain hidden in the woods.
Remains:
Current Status: Kern is a ghost town in the Municipality of Anchorage in the U.S. state of Alaska, located off of the Seward Highway. It was destroyed by a tsunami in 1964.
Remarks: Kern was located south of Girdwood, Alaska. The town is now entirely overgrown by the Chugach National Forest, and no buildings are visible from the highway. Its remnants are located somewhere along the first southbound pulloff from the Seward Highway after passing Girdwood, as well as near the Alaska Railroad. There is still a marker that reads “Kern.” The roads can still be seen, but the entire settlement is overgrown, and avalanches have buried and destroyed much of the town. Kern is located near Kern Creek.

Kijik

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 60°17′33″N 154°15′1″W / 60.29250°N 154.25028°W / 60.29250
Elevation:
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: In 1979, twelve acres of the village site were added to the National Register of Historic Places as a historic district.[2] A much larger area, encompassing a significant number of archaeological sites related to the habitation and use of the area from at least the 12th century forward, was designated a National Historic Landmark District in 1994, for the unique concentration of sites related to the inland Dena’ina people. The community was known by many other names than “Kijik” during its history, including “Lake Clark Village”, “Nijik”, “Nikhkak”, “Nikhak”, and “Old Keegik”. Its current name has been spelled in a wide variety of ways, including “Keechik”, “Keeghik”, “Keejik”, “Keggik”, “Keygik”, “Kichak”, “Kichik”, “Kilchik”, and “Kilchikh”.
Remains:
Current Status: Kijik is a ghost town in Lake and Peninsula Borough, Alaska, United States. An Athabascan village that was established on the shores of Lake Clark in the Alaska Range, its population was recorded at 91 in the 1880 United States Census and declined thereafter, falling to approximately 25 individuals by 1904. Today, the village has been abandoned. The ghost town is located within the bounds of Lake Clark National Park and Preserve.
Remarks: The historic portion of the village was the subject of archaeological and ethnological research in the 1960s. Interviews with Dena’ina elders in Nondalton established that the people of Kijik relocated to Old Nondalton (not far from present-day Nondalton) in the early 19th century, probably to be closer to trading posts and the canneries of Bristol Bay. A survey expedition that visited the site in 1909 reported it to be abandoned. A major archaeological excavation of the historic village took place in 1966, exposing twelve foundational remnants of log houses (many of the houses having apparently been moved to Old Nondalton at the time of the relocation), and two of what appeared to be larger communal structures.

King Island

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Latitude / Longitude: 64° 58′ 30 N, 168° 3′ 35 W
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Comments: King island is a small island located about 40 miles (64 km) offshore, south of the village of Wales, Alaska and about 90 miles Northwest of Nome. The island is about 1 mile (1.6 km) wide with steep slopes on all sides. It was named by James Cook, first European to sight the island in 1778, for Lt. James King, a member of his party. It is part of the Bering Sea unit of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge.
Remains:
Current Status: In the mid 1900s the Bureau of Indian Affairs closed the school on Ukivok, forcefully taking the children of Ukivok to go to school on mainland Alaska, leaving the elders and adults to gather the needed food for winter. Because the children were not on the island to help gather the needed food for winter, the adults and elders had no choice but to move to mainland to make their living. By 1970, all King Island people had moved to mainland Alaska year-round. Even after the movement off the island, some King Islanders still return to gather subsistence foods such as walrus and seal. Although the King Islanders have moved off the island, they have kept a very distinct cultural identity, living a very similar life as they had on the island.
Remarks: In 2005 and 2006 the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded a research project which brought a few King Island natives back to the island. Some participants had not been back to the island in 50 years. The King Island Community awaits the project’s results.

Knik

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Latitude / Longitude: 61°27′29″N 149°43′41″W / 61.45806°N 149.72806°W / 61.45806
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Kwigiumpainukamiut

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Latitude / Longitude: 61° 34′ 6.96 N, 159° 13′ 32.88 W
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Comments: Kwigiumpainukamiut is a ghost town in Bethel Census Area, Alaska, United States located between Chuathbaluk and Napaimute, directly across the river from Kolmakoff Island. It is a clearing about 200 yards (200 m) long. In the early spring, it is covered with tan-colored grass and is easier to see.
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Loring

County: Ketchikan Gateway Borough
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 55°36′11″N 131°38′13″W / 55.60306°N 131.63694°W / 55.60306
Elevation:
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established: 1885
Disestablished:
Comments: Loring was established in 1885 with the first post office in the District of Alaska and is a census-designated place (CDP) in Ketchikan Gateway Borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. The population was 4 at the 2010 census. Though this varies with the season when the population is around 50 in the summer months.
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Remarks: The official website for the community is www.loringalaska.info created in 2000 to share history, community and area information.

Mary’s Igloo

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Latitude / Longitude: 65°09′N 165°04′W / 65.150°N 165.067°W / 65.150
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Meehan

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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Ohagamiut

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Latitude / Longitude: 61° 34′ 4 N, 161° 51′ 49 W
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established: 1892
Disestablished: 1940s
Comments: Ohagamiut (Urr’agmiut in Central Alaskan Yup’ik) was a Yup’ik village along the Kuskokwim River in the Bethel Census Area of the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Alaska, located between Crow Village and Kalskag. It was abandoned in the 1940s as residents relocated to Kalskag, Aniak, Bethel and other towns. Ohagamiut is sometimes confused with another Yup’ik village on the Yukon River called Ohogamiut.
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Remarks: Ohagamiut has also been called Okhogamute. The first reference to the village comes from Russian explorers who traveled down the Kuskokwim River in 1818. The first Roman Catholic mission in western Alaska was established at Ohagamuit in 1892. The first census of Alaska completed in 1884 by Ivan Petrof showed Okhogamute having a population of 130.

Olnes

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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Ophir

County: Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 63°08′41″N 156°31′10″W / 63.14472°N 156.51944°W / 63.14472
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Comments: Ophir is an unincorporated area located in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska. It was named by miners after the wealthy land of Ophir mentioned in the Old Testament. The area was the site of a gold rush in 1906. Ophir reached a peak population of 122 in 1910. Mining still goes on at Ganes and Little Creeks, and probably at Ophir Creek (2006). Further downriver, on the east side, there were mining operations at Folger, Cripple, Bear and Colorado Creeks. Bear Creek and Colorado still are actively mined (2006). Mining of tailings was underway at Cripple in 2010.
Remains:
Current Status: Ophir is now abandoned, but serves as a checkpoint in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. An airport with a single gravel runway exists at the village, built prior to 1949. It is currently in disuse and unmaintained.
Remarks: There are a number of creeks near Ophir, all on the west bank of the Innoko, where gold placers were located starting about 1906. Yankee Creek is the closest to the source of the river, then Ganes, Little and Spruce Creeks, all above Ophir Creek. The original Iditarod trail ran above Ganes Creek in the summer, down the Innoko valley in the winter; the current race trail goes through the old townsite, which was destroyed in a brush fire started by a camper in the 1970s, and is a rest stop.

Pedro

County: Lake & Peninsula Borough
Zip Code: 99647
Latitude / Longitude: 59°46’56N 154°7’57W
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Port Wakefield

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Latitude / Longitude: 58° 2′ 57 N, 153° 3′ 9 W
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established: 1930s
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Comments: Port Wakefield is a ghost town in the U.S. state of Alaska. It is located on the northeast coast of Raspberry Island in the Kodiak Archipelago, along the western shores of the Gulf of Alaska. The community was established in the 1930s by Lee Howard Wakefield as a herring reduction plant after he relocated the family’s salmon cannery business, Apex Fish Company, from Anacortes, Washington and renamed the company Wakefield Fisheries. Lee’s sons Howard, Lavern and Lowell began fishing for and processing experimentally for king crab in 1939.
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Remarks: Port Wakefield suffered badly in the 1964 Alaska earthquake and tsunami, when Raspberry Island subsided by as much as six feet. This was the most powerful recorded earthquake in North American history, and the third most powerful ever measured by seismograph; with a moment magnitude of 9.2 and a maximum Mercalli intensity of XI (Extreme). The town was not destroyed, but the cannery and community were no longer viable. The land was eventually purchased and is now used for tourism, as wilderness lodges.

Portage

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Latitude / Longitude: 60° 50′ 13.2 N, 148° 59′ 6 W
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Comments: Portage is a town and former settlement on Turnagain Arm in Alaska, about 47 miles (76 km) south of Anchorage. Popular recreational activities in the Portage area include visiting the wildlife center, floating Portage, Twentymile, Placer rivers, Fishing for hooligan in the Twentymile river, and iceskating the numerous marshy areas, creeks, and Portage Lake.
Remains: All that remains today are the ruins of a few buildings and a “ghost forest” of trees that died after salt water inundated their root systems. Where there was once a town there is now only a railroad and road junction linking the Seward Highway and the Alaska Railroad to Portage Glacier park and the Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel, which leads to Whittier.
Current Status: This town was destroyed almost entirely in the 1964 Good Friday earthquake when the ground in the area sank about six feet, putting most of the town below high tide level.
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Prospect Creek

County: Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 66°48′48″N 150°38′38″W / 66.81333°N 150.64389°W / 66.81333
Elevation: 014 ft (309 m)
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Comments: Prospect Creek is a very small settlement approximately 180 miles (290 km) north of present-day Fairbanks and 25 miles (40 km) southeast of present-day Bettles, Alaska. Years ago it was home to numerous mining expeditions and the camp for the building of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS). Today, it is the location of Pump Station 5 (Jim River Station) of the TAPS. Prospect Creek is also home to the United States record for lowest temperature.
Remains: There was little left afterward other than an airstrip (Prospect Creek(PPC)(PARP) 1095′ MSL) and a large gravel pad.
Current Status:
Remarks: A camp was set up near Prospect Creek in 1974 to help house some of the 27,000 people working on the construction of the TAPS and serve Pump Station 5. The camp contained little more than housing and washrooms. After the TAPS was completed in 1977 the camp was broken down and abandoned.

Seaside

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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Snettisham

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Latitude / Longitude: 57° 59′ 3 N, 133° 47′ 17 W
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established: The company began operations in 1899 and was incorporated on May 31, 1901
Disestablished: The company discontinued all operations in early 1905.
Comments: Snettisham is a locale and former populated place in the City and Borough of Juneau, Alaska, United States. Based on the mainland coast of Stephens Passage, it is 31 miles (50 km) southeast of the city of Juneau. The area was named by George Vancouver in 1794; the bay on which Snettisham was located (Port Snettisham) was named for the town of Snettisham in England. It was established as a gold- and silver-mining camp around 1895, its operations being linked to those in the immediate Juneau area, and it remained a small harbor village until 1926.
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Remarks: The name was collected by the United States Geological Survey between 1976 and 1981, and entered into the Geographic Names Information System on March 31, 1981.

Speel River

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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Sulzer

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Latitude / Longitude: 55° 17′ 20 N, 132° 37′ 15 W
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
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Comments: Sulzer, Alaska is a ghost town on Prince of Wales Island in the U.S. state of Alaska. The community centered on a copper mine established by William Sulzer on the shore of Hetta Inlet.
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Current Status: Sulzer, Alaska is a ghost town on Prince of Wales Island in the U.S. state of Alaska. The community centered on a copper mine established by William Sulzer on the shore of Hetta Inlet.
Remarks: Charles August Sulzer, brother of William and delegate to the United States Congress from the Territory of Alaska, died in Sulzer in 1919.

Three Saints Bay

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Latitude / Longitude: 57°8′57″N 153°29′17″W / 57.14917°N 153.48806°W / 57.14917
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established: 1784
Disestablished: The Russian settlement site was listed on the United States National Register of Historic Places in 1972, and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1978.
Comments: Three Saints Bay (Russian: Бухта Трёх Святителей, r Bukhta Tryokh Svyatitelyej) is a 9 Mile (14 Kilometer)-long inlet on the southeast side of Kodiak Island, Alaska, north of Sitkalidak Strait. It is 97 km (60 mi) southwest of Kodiak. The Three Saints Bay Site is an archaeological site, the location of the first Russian settlement in Alaska, Three Saints Harbor (Гавань Трёх Святителей, Gavan’ Tryokh Svyatitelyej). The settlement was founded in 1784 by Grigory Shelikhov.
Remains: This original Russian site continued to be occupied as a smaller station of lesser importance until roughly the mid-19th century, at which time it was relocated to a site about 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) away.
Current Status: Now known as the city of Kodiak.
Remarks: Only a few remnants of the Russian occupation remain on the surface. These are mainly pits and rectangular depressions, indications of where structures were located, and some plants that are evidence of the small-scale agriculture which was practiced there. The settlement’s cemetery was located to its southeast. Excavation at the site yielded evidence that it was built on the site of an older native settlement, dating to c. 100 BCE.

Tin City

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Latitude / Longitude: 65°33′31″N 167°56′53″W / 65.55861°N 167.94806°W / 65.55861
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established: 1902
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Comments: Tin City is not a populated place except for a nearby minimally manned radar station, located in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is situated at mouth of Cape Creek, on the Bering Sea coast, 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Cape Prince of Wales on the Seward Peninsula.
Remains: Tin City is not a populated place except for a nearby minimally manned radar station
Current Status: Tin ore was discovered on Cape Mountain in July 1902. A mining camp was established at the base of the mountain in 1903 and the Tin City post office was opened in 1904. By 1907 it had a few widely scattered houses and two companies operating out of the village. The post office closed in 1909.
Remarks: They also have the nearby Tin City LRRS (Long Range Radar Site) Airport.

Unga

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Latitude / Longitude: 55°11′03″N 160°30′18″W / 55.18417°N 160.50500°W / 55.18417 -160.50500
Elevation: 59 feet (18 m)
Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established: 1833
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Comments: Unga is a ghost town on Unga Island in the Aleutians East Borough of the U.S. state of Alaska, about two miles west of Sand Point. The island’s length is 15 miles (24 km).
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Current Status: It was settled by Aleuts in 1833 and was named Delarov, referring to Evstratii Ivanovich Delarov of the Shelikhov-Golikov Company, with a population of 116. The village was reported as Ougnagok by F. P. Lutke in 1836. Its first post office was established in 1888 and in 1890 Apollo Mining Co. was established. In 1894, its name was changed to Unga. The post office was closed in 1958. In 1969, the last family left Unga. Most of the people who left Unga moved to Sand Point.
Remarks: The Ounga post office, established in 1888; changed its name to Unga in 1894; discontinued in 1958.

York

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Latitude / Longitude: 65° 29′ 38.4 N, 167° 41′ 2.4 W
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Time Zone: Alaska (AKST) (UTC-9)
Established: 1900
Disestablished: 1902
Comments: York was a settlement in the U.S. state of Alaska. The mining camp was situated at the mouth of Anikovik River, at Cape York on the Seward Peninsula. It was a distributing point for the region lying to the north. In the spring of 1900, York promised to be a place of importance, but in the early fall, its population had been reduced to about 20-30. The settlement included a number of log cabins and half a dozen substantial frame buildings. During the stormy months of the fall, landing at York was difficult. It was reached overland with horses from Port Clarence. Fifteen miles to the west of York, at Cape Prince of Wales, is the city of Kengegan (Wales), which is the westernmost settlement on the North American continent.
Remains: York is about 80 miles (130 km) from Nome and 45 miles (72 km) from Port Clarence. The lack of shelter from southerly storms made the landing at York during the fall months often both difficult and dangerous.
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How Many Ghost Towns Are In Alaska?