Ghost Towns of Indiana

Indiana State Flag

Anita

County: Johnson
Zip Code: 46181
Latitude / Longitude: 39°25′33″N 86°11′29″W / 39.42583°N 86.19139°W / 39.42583 -86.19139
Elevation: 810 ft (250 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Anita is an extinct town in Hensley Township, Johnson County, Indiana, United States.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Baltimore

County: Warren
Zip Code: 47932
Latitude / Longitude: 40°09′57″N 87°26′31″W / 40.16583°N 87.44194°W / 40.16583 -87.44194
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Baltimore was a small town built on the western banks of the Wabash River in Mound Township, Warren County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: Baltimore was laid out in November 1829 by William Willmeth and Samuel Hill. It flourished for several years, and the population reached 70. In 1830, Samuel Hill had a stock of merchandise worth $2500 at his establishment, which was the largest stock in the county at the time. A post office was established in 1833 and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1865. Another store was opened by Samuel Wetzel in 1839.
Current Status: When the Wabash and Erie Canal was completed on the opposite side of the river in the 1840s, the community dwindled. With the exception of a single brick house built in the 1880s, no trace of Baltimore now remains.
Remarks:

Barbersville

County: Jefferson
Zip Code: 47250
Latitude / Longitude: 38°49′33″N 85°20′18″W / 38.82583°N 85.33833°W / 38.82583 -85.33833
Elevation: 571 ft (174 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Barbersville, Indiana, was an unincorporated town in Shelby Township, Jefferson County, Indiana. Nothing remains of its few buildings.
Remains: Barbersville was probably preceded by the town of Edinburgh, which was platted on Nov. 3, 1815, and recorded in the Jefferson County deed records. No legal land definitions were included, but a rough map showed the land of the proprietors, Wilson Buchanan, George Benefiel, and James Whitton, who was neighboring landowners, all of whom had land in the Barbersville area. They laid out sixty-four lots laid out around a public square, which was filed in Jefferson County Deed Book A page 174.
Current Status: In the twentieth century, the area was severely depopulated and there are no residences or other buildings along the Barbersville Road for about two miles, including the area in which the town was once located.
Remarks: The Barbersville Post Office operated from Dec. 7, 1826 to Nov. 19, 1838 and then was transferred to nearby Buchanan’s Station in Ripley County. Mail service was then provided by the Canaan Post Office in Shelby Township. The government re-established the Barberville’s office on June 27, 1848 and it operated until May 31, 1906, when service was transferred to Canaan.

Beeville

County: Tippecanoe
Zip Code: 47930
Latitude / Longitude: 40°13′18″N 86°47′24″W / 40.221570°N 86.790090°W / 40.221570 -86.790090
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Beeville was a small town, now extinct, in Lauramie Township, near the southern border of Tippecanoe County in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: Beeville was platted in 1884 along with the Toledo, St. Louis, and Western Railroad and consisted of at least 10 lots.
Current Status: Though it gained some inhabitants, the town never saw much growth, and little to no trace of it remains today.
Remarks:

Berlin

County: Clinton
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Berlin is an extinct town in Johnson Township, Clinton County, Indiana in the United States. Platted in 1847 on Indian Prairie near the southeast corner of the township, the town faded during the 19th century and by the early 1900s was “off the map”.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Brisco

County: Warren
Zip Code: 47993
Latitude / Longitude: 40°24′40″N 87°21′30″W / 40.41111°N 87.35833°W / 40.41111 -87.35833
Elevation: 679 ft (207 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Brisco (or Briscoe) was a small town in Pine Township, Warren County, in the U.S. state of Indiana. It began in the 1850s and gained a one-room school in 1856, which operated until 1929.
Remains: In 1930 the school building became a general store run for more than 50 years by local resident Jim Marquess.
Current Status: Never more than a tiny hamlet, Brisco almost entirely disappeared during the 20th century and now no longer appears on county maps, though the USGS cites it, and a cemetery northeast of town still bears the name.
Remarks:

Chatterton

County: Warren
Zip Code: 47975
Latitude / Longitude: 40°24′13″N 87°14′23″W / 40.40361°N 87.23972°W / 40.40361 -87.23972
Elevation: 712 ft (217 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Chatterton was a small town in Adams Township, Warren County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: It was founded in 1896 and included a school, a general store, and a post office that operated from 1900 to 1906.
Current Status: Though it has since dwindled away completely, the location of the town still persists on county maps, and is cited by the USGS. The mailbox for the single house remaining at the site has “Chatterton” stenciled on it.
Remarks:

Chesapeake

County: Warren
Zip Code: 47993
Latitude / Longitude: 40°14′40.52″N 87°26′35.66″W / 40.2445889°N 87.4432389°W / 40.2445889 -87.4432389
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Chesapeake was the first town in Steuben Township, Warren County, Indiana, which was formed in 1834. It was located about two miles east of the present-day town of Marshfield and was the site of the first meetings of the township trustees in the 1830s.
Remains: County Agent Luther Tillotson lived south of the town and may have had some involvement in its creation. Chesapeake consisted of at least several houses, a country store operated by William Newell and Thomas Washburn, and a blacksmith shop. There was also a schoolhouse there named for the town for many years, but this also is gone.
Current Status: Little else is known of Chesapeake and there is no record of a town platting. An 1883 history of the county notes that “comparatively nothing can be learned regarding this little town… The village began early and then died early, as good-looking babies are said to do.”
Remarks:

Collins

County: Whitley
Zip Code: 46725
Latitude / Longitude: 41°11′51″N 85°23′12″W / 41.19750°N 85.38667°W / 41.19750 -85.38667
Elevation: 863 ft (263 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Collins is an unincorporated community in Smith Township, Whitley County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: Collins was platted in 1872 and was named after James Collins, a railroad official.
Current Status: It is commonly referred to as a ‘ghost town’, however, this is untrue; Collins just has a very low population and contains an abandoned school.
Remarks: A post office was established at Collins in 1872, and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1913.

Conrad

County: Newton
Zip Code: 46349
Latitude / Longitude: 41°06’18 N 87°26’36 W
Elevation: 679 ft (207 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Conrad is an unincorporated community in Lake Township, Newton County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: Conrad was laid out as a town in 1908 by Jennie M. Conrad. A post office was established at Conrad in 1906, and remained in operation until 1915.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Corwin (Henry County)

County: Henry
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 39°53′0″N 085°17′00″W / 39.88333°N 85.28333°W / 39.88333
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Corwin was a small settlement in Henry County, Indiana, United States. Established in the mid 19th century, the site was little more than a station along with the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, and St. Louis Railway and never saw significant development.
Remains:
Current Status: Though the railroad (now operated as the Connersville and New Castle Railroad) still persists, no other trace of Corwin remains.
Remarks:

Corwin (Tippecanoe County)

County: Tippecanoe
Zip Code: 47981
Latitude / Longitude: 40°15′5″N 86°54′52″W / 40.25139°N 86.91444°W / 40.25139
Elevation: 735 ft (224 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Corwin was a small town, now extinct, in Randolph Township, Tippecanoe County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: Corwin was laid out by Cyrus Foltz in 1856 and consisted of seven lots near the rail line which ran south out of Lafayette. The town never flourished, though, and was eclipsed by nearby Romney. Later maps sometimes cite the town as Corwin Station.
Current Status: A post office was established at Corwin in 1854, but was discontinued in that same year. As of 9/19/2016 – The old grain silo has been removed. It appears on the Bing! map which is of an unknown date, however the Google map shows it has been demolished.
Remarks:

Dresser

County: Warren
Zip Code: 47993
Latitude / Longitude: 40°11′56″N 87°26′59″W / 40.19889°N 87.44972°W / 40.19889
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Dresser was a small town in Steuben Township, Warren County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: It was founded shortly before the turn of the 20th century and consisted of several residences and a post office. The post office operated only from 1899 to 1903. The town was named after Paul Dresser, the American songwriter who wrote “On the Banks of the Wabash, Far Away” (which became Indiana’s state song); Harvey Porter Layton, the first postmaster, had met Dresser at the Hotel Mudlavia and was so impressed with the man that he named the town after him.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Dunn

County: Benton
Zip Code: 47944
Latitude / Longitude: 40°33′50″N 87°27′50″W / 40.56389°N 87.46389°W / 40.56389 -87.46389
Elevation: 797 ft (243 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Dunn is an extinct town in Hickory Grove Township, Benton County, Indiana, United States.
Remains: Named for Capt. James Dunn stands about one and a half miles east of Dunnington.
Current Status: In the 1920s it had two general stores, a grain elevator and about half a dozen residences. The post office at Dunn was established in 1907 and discontinued in 1913.
Remarks:

Elkinsville

County: Brown
Zip Code: 47448
Latitude / Longitude: 39°04′34″N 86°15′53″W / 39.07611°N 86.26472°W / 39.07611 -86.26472
Elevation: 577 ft (176 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Elkinsville is an unincorporated community in Van Buren Township, Brown County, Indiana, United States.
Remains: It was once a thriving farming village but was evacuated during the construction of nearby Lake Monroe Reservoir by eminent domain in 1964.
Current Status: All that remains of Elkinsville today are some private residences, the Elkinsville Cemetery, and the post office. The area is part of Hoosier National Forest.
Remarks: Elkinsville was founded in the 1850s. It was named for William Elkins, a pioneer settler. A post office was established at Elkinsville in 1860, and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1941.

Elizabethtown (Delaware County)

County: Delaware
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 40°22’29 N 85°27’40 W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Elizabethtown was a small, now extinct town in northern Delaware County in Washington Township, Delaware County, Indiana. The town was platted in the early 19th century and was located along the north bank of the Mississinewa River in section 12, of Washington Township, in Delaware County, Indiana.
Remains: The town was platted in the early 1800s by Joseph Wilson and named in honor of his daughter, Elizabeth Wilson. The town’s central economic activity was centered on flour and a sawmill. The town’s inhabitants had hoped for the village to become the county seat of either Blackford or Delaware county. Blackford county chose Hartford City and Delaware county chose Muncie.
Current Status: The town slowly declined in the middle of the 19th century and ceased to exist at the beginning of the 20th. The only existing remnant of the town is the adjacent Elizabethtown Cemetery.
Remarks:

Glen Hall

County: Tippecanoe
Zip Code: 47992
Latitude / Longitude: 40°21’15 N 87°2’27 W
Elevation: 617 ft (188 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Glen Hall is a small unincorporated community in Wayne Township, Tippecanoe County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: A post office was established at Glen Hall in 1866 and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1904.
Current Status: The site is often considered part of the adjoining town of West Point.
Remarks:

Granville

County: Tippecanoe
Zip Code: 47909
Latitude / Longitude: 40°24’25 N 87°01’53 W
Elevation: 550 ft (170 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Granville is a former town in Wayne Township, Tippecanoe County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: Thomas W. Treckett and Thomas Concannon founded the town in 1834 on the south side of the Wabash and Erie Canal, just south of the Wabash River near the former site of the Native American settlement of Ouiatenon. They platted the town to contain 153 lots, a public square, and several streets, with such names as Lafayette, Cherry, Wabash, and Washington. This plat is still in effect, with the lots and streets still visible in the county’s GIS.
Current Status: The cemetery east of the town and the nearby bridge across the Wabash River still bears the name of Granville, though these areas are now serviced by the postal service as a part of West Point, Indiana.
Remarks: In 1850 the town’s name was changed to Weaton, after the local Wea Indians (some maps incorrectly labeled it as “Wheaton”). They had been mostly removed west of the Mississippi River by treaties with the United States government. Later the name was changed back to Granville. The town flourished as a shipping center on the canal until the mid-1850s when railroad competition drew off much of the business. With the decline of canal traffic, the town’s economy also declined sharply. By 1878 Granville had virtually ceased to exist.

Heath

County: Tippecanoe
Zip Code: 47905
Latitude / Longitude: 40°27′41″N 86°44′00″W / 40.46139°N 86.73333°W / 40.46139
Elevation: 669 ft (204 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Heath was a small town, now extinct, in Perry Township, Tippecanoe County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: Heath is located at 40°27’41” North, 86°44’00” West (40.461389, -86.733333), on a bluff overlooking Wildcat Creek to the southeast. It is in Perry Township and has an elevation of approximately 669 feet. The post office at Heath was established in 1888 and discontinued in 1902.
Current Status: A few buildings in the community still exist, and it is still cited by the USGS.
Remarks:

Hindostan Falls (Martin County)

County: Martin
Zip Code: 47581
Latitude / Longitude: 38°37′28″N 86°51′03″W / 38.62444°N 86.85083°W / 38.62444 -86.85083
Elevation: 459 ft (140 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Hindostan Falls is an extinct unincorporated community in Center Township, Martin County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: Hindostan was founded at the falls of the East Fork of the White River in 1816. The settlement sat along the original stagecoach route between New Albany and Vincennes and was one of the only roads in the new state of Indiana, which had been a territory until 1816. By 1820, it was the largest community in what was then still Daviess County and the most promising town on the White River. The town was named “Hindostan” by a soldier, Captain Caleb Fellows, an English immigrant who had served with the British East India Company in India before he came to the United States and invested in land along the still raw Indiana frontier.
Current Status: The site is now the location of an Indiana state fishing and recreation area. A historic marker on County Road 550 stands a half-mile north of where the town was. No buildings survive, but there are a few surviving pioneer cemeteries nearby, a restored church, and numerous square holes in a large flat rock along the river drilled to support a mill at Hindostan. (The mill was owned by Frederick Shulz, after whom the town of Shoals was named.)
Remarks: By 1820, about 1,200 people lived in the new town, making it one of the largest settlements in frontier Indiana. Many lived on houseboats on the White River. The surge of population toward new land on the Indiana and Illinois frontiers, as well as Hindostan’s location along the stagecoach route, meant that it was constantly open to carriers of disease. Disease eventually destroyed the town.

Kickapoo

County: Warren
Zip Code: 47918
Latitude / Longitude: 40°19′48″N 87°13′59″W / 40.33000°N 87.23306°W / 40.33000 -87.23306
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Kickapoo was a small town (now extinct) in Warren Township, Warren County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: Platted by Lewis Davisson on February 2, 1885, the town was served by the newly-constructed Chicago and Great Southern Railway. The town never grew substantially and is described in a 1913 history as having “a small population”.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Locust Grove

County: Warren
Zip Code: 47917
Latitude / Longitude: 40°26′26″N 87°26′5″W / 40.44056°N 87.43472°W / 40.44056 -87.43472
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Locust Grove was a small town (now extinct) in Prairie Township, Warren County, in the U.S. state of Indiana, located three miles northeast of Tab.
Remains:
Current Status: A 1913 history describes the town’s population as “less than a hundred”, but all that remains at the site is the Locust Grove Church, Locust Grove Cemetery and a few homes.
Remarks:

Marshfield

County: Warren
Zip Code: 47993
Latitude / Longitude: 40°15’2 N 87°27’10 W
Elevation: 699 ft (213 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Marshfield is a small unincorporated community in Steuben Township, Warren County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: The town of Marshfield was platted on May 22, 1857, and named for Marshfield, Massachusetts, the home of statesman Daniel Webster. A post office was established on April 6, 1857, which operated until 1989. In 1870, the population was 150 and, by 1900, it had grown to 250. In the late 1800s, the town had a dry goods store, a hotel, three churches, three saloons, two blacksmith shops, a grain warehouse, a wagon and carriage manufactory, a grocery store, a drug store, and three physicians.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Martinsville

County: Morgan
Zip Code: 46151
Latitude / Longitude: 39°25’38 N 86°25’40 W
Elevation: 604 ft (184 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Martinsville is a city in Washington Township, Morgan County, in the U.S. state of Indiana. The population was 11,828 at the 2010 United States Census. The city is the county seat of Morgan County.
Remains: Martinsville was founded in 1822. It is said to be named for John Martin, a county commissioner. A post office has been in operation at Martinsville since 1823.
Current Status: The Morgan County Courthouse, completed in 1859, features a red brick and Italianate design and is one of the few pre-Civil War courthouses in Indiana. Architect Isaac Hodgson designed the courthouse, and it was built by Perry Magnus Blankenship. Hodgson designed six Indiana courthouses including Jennings County Courthouse (1859), Morgan County (1857), Henry County Courthouse, Bartholomew County Courthouse (1871), and his largest in Marion County, in Indianapolis.
Remarks:

Mollie

County: Blackford
Zip Code: 47348
Latitude / Longitude: 40°30′30″N 85°18′54″W / 40.50833°N 85.31500°W / 40.50833 -85.31500
Elevation: 869 ft (265 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Mollie is an extinct American village in Blackford County, Indiana, that flourished during the Indiana Gas Boom from the 1880s until the 1920s. The region around Mollie experienced an economic “boom” period because of the discovery of gas and crude oil. Mollie was a stop along with the Fort Wayne, Cincinnati, and Louisville Railroad—and happened to be near the region’s oil fields, a convenient location for the area’s oil workers.
Remains: Mollie’s location on the railroad line was approximately halfway between the two largest cities in Blackford County: Hartford City and Montpelier. In addition to the oil fields, the area was also fertile farmland. Two county roads intersected at Mollie, making it well-located for area farmers as well as the oil workers. The small community had a feed mill, a grocery, a Post Office, and a livestock station. The sole manufacturing facility was a brick and tile mill. Mollie’s significance, in addition to its participation in the Indiana Gas Boom and its railroad station, is that Mollie is thought to be the site of the first aircraft landing in Blackford County.
Current Status: Today (2011), none of the community’s commercial buildings remain. Two houses are located nearby—including one that was built using bricks made from the community’s tile mill. Interurban lines declined in popularity in Indiana during the 20th century, and a line serving Mollie was removed in the 1940s. Although the track that was the Mollie railroad spur is gone, freight trains operated by the Norfolk Southern Railway still operate over the adjacent main line.
Remarks:

Monument City (Huntington County)

County: Huntington
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 40°23’50 N 87°19’48 W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Monument City is a former settlement in Huntington County, Indiana.
Remains: Located at the current site of the Salamonie Reservoir in southern Huntington County, the parking area to view the remains of Monument City is located near the coordinates 40°45’49.45 N 85°35’31.64” W. Monument City was covered by the damming up of the Salamonie River to create Salamonie Lake in 1965. When the reservoir is low, remains are visible. Former residents are now scattered throughout Huntington and the surrounding counties, although many have died since the destruction of the town.
Current Status: The site of the former Monument City came into view again during the severe drought of 2012, as reported in an article by Jill Disis in the Indianapolis Star for Sunday, July 22, 2012. The article reported that, by late July, the Salamonie Reservoir’s water level was so low that tourists and other curious visitors were able to walk among the foundations of houses and a school. Later that same day, Indiana’s Department of Natural Resources announced that the site would be closed to further visits.
Remarks: The cemetery (Monument City Memorial Cemetery) that existed in the town was relocated to a different area of Polk township and is still in use and open to those who wish to visit it. The cemetery includes the original monument that the city was named for, listing those from Polk Township who lost their lives in the Civil War.

Point Pleasant

County: Warren
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 40°23′50″N 87°19′48″W / 40.39722°N 87.33000°W / 40.39722 -87.33000
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Point Pleasant was a small village (now extinct) in Pine Township, Warren County, Indiana, located about a mile and a half southwest of Rainsville near the confluence of Big Pine Creek and Mud Pine Creek, a site currently known as Rocky Ford.
Remains: It was laid out by one John H. Bartlett and platted July 14, 1830, but never grew, and consisted only of Bartlett’s residence, a liquor store and perhaps a saw mill. An 1883 county history describes Point Pleasant, but notes that “this was a paper town only.” Population: 1
Current Status:
Remarks:

Prairieville

County: Clinton
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Prairieville is an extinct town in Perry Township, Clinton County, Indiana, in the United States.
Remains:
Current Status: About five miles west of the town of Manson, it was abandoned during the 19th century.
Remarks:

Quaker

County: Vermillion
Zip Code: 47847
Latitude / Longitude: 39°51′48″N 87°31′40″W / 39.86333°N 87.52778°W / 39.86333
Elevation: 633 ft (193 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Quaker (or Quaker Point) is an unincorporated community in Vermillion Township, Vermillion County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: The post office at Quaker was established in 1894 and discontinued in 1914. The community was originally built up chiefly by Quakers.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Randall

County: Vermillion
Zip Code: 47847
Latitude / Longitude: 39°46′30″N 87°31′21″W / 39.77500°N 87.52250°W / 39.77500
Elevation: 617 ft (188 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Randall is a former town in Helt Township, Vermillion County, in the U.S. state of Indiana. Randall is also 1.6 miles northwest of another extinct town: Toronto, on W County Road 700 S. The nearest extant community is the town of Dana, to the northeast.
Remains: The post office at Randall was established in 1858 and discontinued in 1872. The community was named in honor of the Randall family of settlers.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Renner

County: Blackford
Zip Code: 47348
Latitude / Longitude: 40°28′20″N 85°25′53″W / 40.47222°N 85.43139°W / 40.47222 -85.43139
Elevation: 919 ft (280 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Renner is an extinct American village in Indiana’s Blackford County. Although Renner has been listed as a “populated place” by the U.S. Geological Survey, this description is misleading.
Remains: Renner was a railroad stop on the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and St. Louis Railroad. The land around the railroad stop was originally used to supply timber for railroad crossties, and eventually became a livestock farm. Housing for the families of the employees of the livestock farm was also located nearby.
Current Status: Although it is not known for certain, Renner is thought to have been named for railroad executive John W. Renner. Renner was an executive of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and St. Louis Railroad, and later the Pennsylvania Railroad, and retired with over 50 years of railroad experience. Another community, Rennerdale, Pennsylvania, was named in his honor in 1895.
Remarks:

Sheff

County: Benton
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 40°42′15″N 87°26′56″W / 40.70417°N 87.44889°W / 40.70417
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Sheff was the name of an interlocking tower that controlled the crossing of the New York Central (NYC) railroad and the NYC subsidiary, Big Four (CCC&StL) railroad.
Remains:
Current Status: It no longer exists. The site is in Benton County, Indiana, United States.
Remarks:

Sloan

County: Warren
Zip Code: 47993
Latitude / Longitude: 40°18′06″N 87°28′34″W / 40.30167°N 87.47611°W / 40.30167 -87.47611
Elevation: 712 ft (217 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Sloan is an extinct town that was located on the border of Jordan Township and Steuben Township in Warren County, Indiana, less than a mile east of the town of Hedrick.
Remains: In 1903 the New York Central Railroad line through Jordan Township was completed, and on June 18, 1914, a post office was established next to the railway at the township’s southern edge. Named for the local Sloan family, it operated until November 29, 1941. The railroad, which by the time of its closure was owned by Conrail, ceased operations in the 1990s, and the tracks have since been removed. No structures remain at the site. The USGS still has data for Sloan, even though it no longer exists.
Current Status: A portion of the railroad, beginning less than four miles north in the town of Stewart, continues to operate as the Bee Line Railroad.
Remarks:

Springville

County: Clark
Zip Code: 47932
Latitude / Longitude: 38° 25′ 39 N, 85° 41′ 13 W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Springville was a small town that existed from 1798 to 1811 in Charlestown Township, Clark County, Indiana, United States.
Remains: It was named for the springs in the area that provided a good freshwater supply. A Frenchman established a trading post at the site in 1799; Indians called it Tullytown due to the prominent trader Charles Tully (pronounced two-lay). It was located at the intersection of four Indian trails, two of which went to what is now Detroit, Michigan, and Cincinnati, Ohio. At Springville’s peak, it had 100 residents. When Clark County was established, Springville has named the county seat on April 7, 1801, creating the first court in the county. On June 9, 1802, the county seat was moved to Jeffersonville, starting the demise of Springville.
Current Status: A simple grid of streets, four north-south and three east-west, named for trees, divided Springville. Among the trades represented in the village were blacksmithing, a distillery, a doctor, hattery, surveying, and a wheelwright.
Remarks:

Stringtown

County: Fountain
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 40°02′29″N 87°22′50″W / 40.04139°N 87.38056°W / 40.04139
Elevation: 640 ft (200 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Stringtown, or String Town, was a small mining settlement near Snoddy’s Mill (now Coal Creek) in Wabash Township, Fountain County, Indiana in the United States.
Remains: An 1881 history of the county offers the following brief description: “String Town” is a mining place close to Snoddy’s mill. It is a collection of cheap houses mostly erected by the coal companies to be used by the miners. It is of mushroom growth, and an immense business is done, especially in liquors, there being about seventeen saloons at this point. It is hoped that the better element will become stronger and that at some time this intemperance will cease. There are about 600 men employed in the mines, and the demand for coal is far beyond the ability to supply on account of the scarcity of conveyance. There are religious organizations here but mostly composed of foreigners engaged in mining.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Toronto

County: Vermillion
Zip Code: 47847
Latitude / Longitude: 39°46′54″N 87°29′44″W / 39.78167°N 87.49556°W / 39.78167
Elevation: 636 ft (194 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Toronto is an extinct town in Helt Township, Vermillion County, in the U.S. state of Indiana. The site is near the Illinois and Indiana border.
Remains: A post office was established in Toronto in 1838 and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1912.
Current Status: A few buildings in the community exist, and it is still cited by the USGS.
Remarks:

Tremont

County: Porter
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 41°38′55″N 87°02′37″W / 41.64861°N 87.04361°W / 41.64861 -87.04361
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established: 1833
Disestablished: 1960s
Comments: Tremont, Indiana, is a ghost town formerly located in what is now the Indiana Dunes State Park and Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in Westchester Township in northern Porter County, Indiana.
Remains: It was first established in 1833. It was located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 12 and County Road 100 East, near Indiana 49. The community is named for three massive sand dunes that are now contained within the State Park. They are Mount Tom (200 feet (61 m) above the surrounding area), Mount Holden 170 feet (52 m), and Mount Green 160 feet (49 m).
Current Status: Tremont was always an unincorporated community, but grew to some extent during the early twentieth century and had its own commuter railroad station on the South Shore. The creation of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in the 1960s, and subsequent land condemnation proceedings, caused the remaining community to disperse.
Remarks: Tremont was originally established as New City West after City West, a settlement on the nearby shore of Lake Michigan that seemed prosperous in the mid-1830s. City West intended to become a large harbor settlement to rival Chicago, which was a small town at the time and had not yet been incorporated. However, after the Panic of 1837, City West was abandoned, becoming a ghost town without a single resident, and subsequently burnt to the ground. Despite the end of its namesake, New City West still maintained the City West Post Office and City West School. About 20 houses were built in the new city after City West collapsed, and a sawmill, cooper shop, and brickyard were established.

Walnut Grove

County: Warren
Zip Code: 47993
Latitude / Longitude: 40°24’40 N 87°24’56 W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Walnut Grove was a small town (now extinct) in Prairie Township, Warren County, Indiana, located three miles east of Tab. A 1913 history describes the town’s population as about 50.
Remains: A post office was once established at Walnut Grove in 1872, and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1900.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Warrenton

County: Warren
Zip Code: 47918
Latitude / Longitude: 40°18′17″N 87°15′30″W / 40.30472°N 87.25833°W / 40.30472
Elevation:
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Warrenton is an extinct town in Warren Township, Warren County, in the U.S. state of Indiana. It was the county’s original county seat.
Remains: Warrenton was selected as the Warren County seat in March 1828 by commissioners appointed under the act forming the county. It was laid out “on the east fraction of the southwest quarter of Section 31, Township 22 North, Range 7 West,” which today is in the extreme southwestern corner of Warren Township, a little over two miles (3 km) northeast of the current county seat of Williamsport. The site overlooks the confluence of Big Pine Creek with the Wabash River.
Current Status: Very few improvements were ever made to the lots at Warrenton and it quickly faded away. No evidence of the town remains at the site.
Remarks:

West Union

County: Parke
Zip Code: 47862
Latitude / Longitude: 39°50’37 N 87°20’12 W
Elevation: 528 ft (161 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: West Union (also called Delta or Union) is an unincorporated community in Reserve Township, Parke County, in the U.S. state of Indiana.
Remains: West Union was platted in 1837. A post office was established at West Union in 1886, and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1932.
Current Status:
Remarks: