Ghost Towns of Arizona (P-Z)

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Pantano

County: Pima
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°59′59″N 110°34′46″W / 31.99972°N 110.57944°W / 31.99972
Elevation: 3,553 ft (1,083 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Pantano (English: “Marsh”) is a populated place located in eastern Pima County, Arizona, near the town of Vail. It was originally a mail and stagecoach stop named Ciénega Station, after the nearby Ciénega Creek, and later grew into a small railroad town with the arrival of the Southern Pacific in 1880.
Remains: Ciénega Station was established by the Butterfield Overland Mail company in 1858. Built over the site of a Hohokam village, the station and later town went by many names over the years, including Pantano Station, Marsh Station, Tulleyville, and Empire. In the early days, hostile Apaches were a constant problem.
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Paradise

County: Cochise
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°56′5″N 109°13′8″W / 31.93472°N 109.21889°W / 31.93472
Elevation: 5,482 ft (1,671 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1901
Disestablished: 1943
Comments: Paradise is a ghost town in Cochise County in the U.S. state of Arizona. The town was settled in 1901 in what was then the Arizona Territory.
Remains: In 1901 the Chiricahua Development Company located a vein of ore here. A post office was established on October 23, 1901, and at its peak, the town had saloons, general stores, a jail and a hotel.
Current Status: The town was essentially abandoned when the local mines failed, and the post office closed on September 30, 1943. However, a few residents remained. In June 2011, there were five permanent residents and 29 standing structures when the Horseshoe 2 Fire swept through the area.
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Pedrick’s

County: Yuma
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Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Piedmont

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°14′20″N 112°51′52″W / 34.23889°N 112.86444°W / 34.23889
Elevation: 3,340 ft (1,018 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Piedmont is a populated place in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States. It is located between the Weaver Mountains and the Date Creek Mountains of central-west Arizona, on Date Creek Road (Yavapai Route 62). It is near the ghost towns of Congress and Hillside.
Remains: All that remains of the town is the sign, along the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway.
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Pierce

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Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Pinal City

County: Pinal
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 33°16′41″N 111°08′21″W / 33.27806°N 111.13917°W / 33.27806
Elevation: 2,526 ft (770 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1878
Disestablished: 1891
Comments: Pinal or Pinal City is a ghost town in Pinal County in the U.S. state of Arizona. The town was populated from the 1870s into the 1890s, in what was then the Arizona Territory.
Remains: The Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park is said to be on the site of Pinal City. Only a few foundations and “a lot of trash” remain at the old townsite. The LOST Trail system crosses from the Arizona Trail to the Town of Superior, crossing through the old Pinal town site.
Current Status: When the Silver King Mine played out, Pinal City went into steep decline. The post office closed on November 28, 1891, and the town was deserted shortly thereafter.
Remarks: After an abortive settlement by troops under General George Stoneman from November 1870 to August 1871 the area was developed by prospectors and ranchers. Silver was discovered resulting in a boom town of about two thousand residents at the foot of Picket Post Mountain by 1878. The post office was established on April 10, 1878, as Picket Post, and the name was formally changed to Pinal on June 27, 1879.

Ray

County: Pinal
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 33°11′00″N 110°59′51″W / 33.18333°N 110.99750°W / 33.18333
Elevation: 2,123 ft (647 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Ray is a populated place in Pinal County, Arizona, United States; it is mostly known for the large copper mine there. It was named after the nearby Ray mine, which was begun by the Ray Copper Company in 1882, after the sister of one of the miner’s, whose name was Bullinger.
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Remarks: The town of Kearny was founded by the Kennecott Mining Company in 1958 as a planned community to accommodate the populations of Ray, Barcelona and Sonora, which were about to be enveloped by Kennecott’s copper mine. Relocation to Kearny began in 1958.

Redington

County: Pima
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°25′39″N 110°29′35″W / 32.42750°N 110.49306°W / 32.42750
Elevation: 2,881 ft (878 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Redington is a populated place in Pima County, Arizona, United States. It is located on the banks of the San Pedro River, northeast of Tucson and about 54 km north-northwest of Benson. The area was previously known as Tres Alamos.
Remains: In the 1880s the rancher William H. Bayless moved his operation into the San Pedro Valley. Over the next several years he bought up homesteads, ranches and other land. Drought in the 1890s caused many settlers in the valley to leave and Bayless acquired their land to build the 200,000-acre Carlink Ranch. The townsite with its general store, post office and school were located within the ranch.
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Reymert

County: Pinal
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 33°13′47″N 111°12′33″W / 33.22972°N 111.20917°W / 33.22972
Elevation: 2,802 ft (854 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Reymert is a populated place in Pinal County, Arizona. Reymert was originally established around a post office that began operation on June 6, 1890. Reymert was named after its founder, James DeNoon Reymart, who also founded the adjacent milling and smelting town of DeNoon. James Reymert also was the editor of the Pinal Drill newspaper published in the nearby town of Pinal City.
Remains: The town’s occupants largely worked at Reymert Mine, until work there stopped in the 1950s. Originally a silver mine, later a silver-manganese mine, it was located approximately 5 miles southwest of Superior, Arizona.
Current Status: A Phoenix-based company bulldozed the remnants of the town in the late 1970s. The remains of two processing kilns still exist, as well as a number of stacked stone foundations
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Rosemont

County: Pima
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Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Ruby

County: Santa Cruz
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°27′40″N 111°14′15″W / 31.46111°N 111.23750°W / 31.46111
Elevation: 4,186 ft (1,276 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Ruby is a populated place in Santa Cruz County, Arizona, United States. It was founded as a mining town in Bear Valley, originally named Montana Camp, so named because the miners were mining at the foot of Montana Peak.
Remains: Mining started around 1877. The Montana Mine produced gold, silver, lead, zinc and copper. At its peak in the mid-1930s, Ruby had a population of about 1,200.
Current Status: Ruby is one of the two best-preserved mining ghost towns in Arizona, along with the Vulture Mine near Wickenburg, Arizona. Ruby’s attractions today include about 25 buildings under roof, including the old jail and houses, the old school, the playground, old mine machinery, buildings and mine workings. Ruby is entirely on private property and there is a charge for admission to the site.
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San Rafael

County: Pima
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°44’14N 112°01’27W
Elevation: 2,172 ft (662 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: San Rafael, is a populated place located in Pima County in the state of Arizona, just north of the border with Mexico.
Remains: On November 24, 1865, San Rafael, then a ranching community, was the site of a raid, by a large Sonoran force of about 350 Opata volunteers under the command of Col. Refugio Tanori, an Opata leader commissioned in the Mexican Imperial Army, that left an American citizen wounded.
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Salero

County: Santa Cruz
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°34′50.57″N 110°51′32.33″W / 31.5807139°N 110.8589806°W / 31.5807139
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Salero is a ghost town in the Santa Rita Mountains of Santa Cruz County, Arizona. As one of the best preserved ghost towns remaining in Arizona, Salero is located on private property of the Salero Ranch and is not open to visitors.
Remains: What remains of Salero is on private property belonging to the Salero Ranch. Steps to stabilize and preserve the deteriorating adobe buildings have been taken and the townsite remains closed to the public to protect it from vandals. Signs are posted against trespassers. Other ghost towns in the area include Alto, about two miles northwest of Salero, and Kentucky Camp, to the northeast.
Current Status: The present-day Salero Mine and ghost town was established in the 1870s by George Clark, following the relocation of the mine a few miles to the east, further up in the mountains. A post office was opened at this new location on August 13, 1884, and was in business for only a short time until April 17, 1890. The Salero Mine remained active into the early 20th century and finally ceased activity sometime after 1920. Sometime later the surviving mine buildings were used as a ranch house, saving them from destruction.
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Santa Claus

County: Mohave
Zip Code: 86401
Latitude / Longitude: 35°20′12″N 114°12′59″W / 35.33667°N 114.21639°W / 35.33667
Elevation: 3,392 ft (1,033.88 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1937
Disestablished: 1995
Comments: Santa Claus (also known as Santa Claus Acres) is populated place in Mohave County, Arizona, United States. Originating in 1937, Santa Claus lies approximately 14 miles (23 km) northwest of Kingman, Arizona, along U.S. Route 93 between mile markers 57 and 58, immediately north of Hermit Drive and just south of both Grasshopper Junction, Arizona, and the Junk Art of Chloride, a group of metal statues in Chloride, Arizona, that include a flamingo made out of a motorcycle gas tank.
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Current Status: In 1988, Santa Claus had three tiny, poorly maintained A-frame buildings painted to represent peppermint candies. American writer Mark Winegardner described Santa Claus at that time as being on its last legs. Additionally, Winegardner noted in his 1988 book Elvis Presley Boulevard
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Socatoon Station

County: Pinal
Zip Code: 85147
Latitude / Longitude: 33°4’48N 111°44’45W
Elevation: 1,283 ft (391 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Sacaton (village)

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Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Sasco

County: Pinal
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°32′06″N 111°26′22″W / 32.53500°N 111.43944°W / 32.53500
Elevation: 1,837 ft (560 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1907
Disestablished: 1921
Comments: Sasco is a ghost town located in Pinal County, Arizona, west of Red Rock. Sasco, which is an acronym for the Southern Arizona Smelter Company, was a company town with a large smelter that served several mines.
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Current Status: Once an impressive and little-known ghost town, today Sasco is a common sporting destination with shotgun shells, airsoft bb’s, paintball splatter, and litter in the area.
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Signal

County: Mohave
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°28′27″N 113°38′02″W / 34.47417°N 113.63389°W / 34.47417
Elevation: 1,340 ft (409 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1876
Disestablished: 1932
Comments: Signal is a ghost town located on the banks of the Big Sandy River in southern Mohave County, Arizona, United States. The town was a mining center from the 1870s to 1930s. The peak population was around 800.
Remains: Signal came into existence because of silver and gold mining in the area. In 1874 the McCracken mines opened up and Signal grew up a couple years later in 1876 to 1877. During its time, the town had mills for local mines and the nearby McCracken mines. A major problem for Signal was getting freight to the isolated location. Shop owners had to make their orders 6 months in advance. At the town’s heyday it had 5 stores, 3 restaurants, and 13 saloons and its own brewery. The town was mostly abandoned by 1932, but a few ranches in the area continue to this day.
Current Status: Remnants of the town can still be seen today along with nearby Virginia City.
Remarks: Little remains of the original mines and mill still exist. Scattered ruins of mine equipment and adobe ruins of the town mark the site today. The ruins are well-preserved due to the remote location. An intact town cemetery also remains. There is a part-time caretaker of the town. The historical remnants of the town sit on Bureau of Land Management land. The area around Signal is not entirely uninhabited as there are several farms and houses nearby, and the unincorporated area of Signal is still listed as populated.

Spenazuma

County: Graham
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°57′17″N 110°11′44″W / 32.95472°N 110.19556°W / 32.95472
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1898
Disestablished: 1899
Comments: Spenazuma was a short-lived mining town, now a ghost town, in Graham County, Arizona, United States. The townsite is now privately owned, and the site of a working ranch. The town of Spenazuma was part of an elaborate swindle by an east coast con man, Richard C. Flower, to sell shares in the Spenazuma Mining Company. In 1898, Flower bought some nearby mining claims, laid out the townsite of Spenazuma, and sold shares in eastern states on the pretense that the Spenazuma Mining Company owned gold mines of immense value. Several trainloads of eastern investors were brought to Spenazuma to sustain the illusion.
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Current Status: The swindle collapsed after an investigation by Arizona Republican reporter George Smalley in 1899. The town was quickly deserted. Flower ostensibly dropped out of the company management, although the remaining management immediately started another mining swindle at Aura, Arizona, now also a ghost town.
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Stanton

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34° 9′ 55 N, 112° 43′ 46 W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: March 5, 1875
Disestablished: June 15, 1905
Comments: The town was originally a stagecoach stop known as Antelope Station, and was later renamed “Stanton” after the businessman and crook Chuck Stanton, who took over the town in the 1870s. Stanton is located about twenty miles north of Wickenburg, at the base of Rich Hill, near the ghost towns of Octave and Weaver.
Remains:
Current Status: Stanton is a populated place in Yavapai County, Arizona, that is now used as an RV park.
Remarks: The town of Stanton, like the towns of Octave and Weaver, owe their existence to a group of pioneers who discovered gold in the area in 1863. Led by the frontiersman Pauline Weaver, the explorers were camped along Antelope Creek when one of the men – a tracker named Alvaro – decided to go chasing after a runaway burro. After climbing to the top of what would become known as Rich Hill, Alvaro tripped over a pile of gold nuggets that were “as big as potatoes.” Soon after, Pauline Weaver and a friend named Jack Swilling found another pile of gold on top of nearby Antelope Hill. Weaver said that gold was so plentiful in the area that he could pop nuggets out of the ground with a knife, and that one acre yielded nearly $500,000 in gold.

Stanwix Station

County: Maricopa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°50’23N 113°19’23W
Elevation: 548 ft (167 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Sunset

County: Navajo
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°02′40″N 110°39′12″W / 35.04444°N 110.65333°W / 35.04444
Elevation: 4,895 ft (1,492 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1876
Disestablished: 1887
Comments: Sunset, Arizona is a populated place and former town in Navajo County, Arizona located about four miles north-west of Winslow, Arizona. It was settled in 1876 by a group of Latter-day Saints under the direction of Lot Smith. Drought and flash flooding that washed away the dams and irrigation systems led to crop failures.
Remains: It ceased being a town by 1884 and the last settlers moved out in 1888. The channel of the Little Colorado River now runs where the town site used to be. Only the small hilltop Sunset Cemetery remains and is part of the Homolovi State Park.
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Swansea

County: La Paz
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°10′12″N 113°50′46″W / 34.17000°N 113.84611°W / 34.17000
Elevation: 1,283 ft (391 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1908
Disestablished: 1937
Comments: Swansea is a populated place in La Paz County in the U.S. state of Arizona. It was settled around 1909 in what was then the Arizona Territory. It served as a mining town as well as a location for processing and smelting the copper ore taken from the nearby mines.
Remains: Today Swansea is under the protection of the Bureau of Land Management, and constitutes the Swansea Town Site Special Management Area. Due to vandalism and exposure to the weather, the remains of Swansea are in decline.
Current Status: However, you can still see a number of adobe structures, the remains of the railroad depot, two cemeteries, and several mine shafts. Remains of numerous cars can be seen scattered throughout the site. The Bureau of Land Management has restored roofs to rows of single-miner’s quarters, established an interpretive trail for visitors to Swansea, and is engaged in efforts to shore up other structures. In addition, there are many stone foundations where buildings once stood.
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Tiger

County: Pinal
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°42′28″N 110°40′56″W / 32.70778°N 110.68222°W / 32.70778
Elevation: 3,081 ft (939 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1881
Disestablished: 1954
Comments: Tiger is a former populated place in Pinal County in the U.S. state of Arizona. The town was settled as Schultz around 1881 in what was then the Arizona Territory, then later reestablished as Tiger after World War
Remains: The area that was to become Tiger was first settled in 1881 after Frank Schultz located gold ore in what was to become the Mammoth Mine. The camp that settled around the mine took the name Schultz, and a post office was established under that name on July 12, 1894.
Current Status: After the San Manuel Copper Company acquired the land, they demolished all remaining structures in order to mine the silica on site for its gold content and as flux material for the San Manuel Smelter. However, the material contained too much lead, and the plan proved fruitless. As such, nothing is left of the town of Tiger today
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Tip Top

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°03′03″N 112°14′49″W / 34.05083°N 112.24694°W / 34.05083
Elevation: 2,510 ft (765 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1876
Disestablished: 1895
Comments: Tip Top is a ghost town in Yavapai County in the U.S. state of Arizona. The town was settled in 1876 in what was then the Arizona Territory. Primarily a silver-mining town, it had a post office from August 12, 1880, until February 14, 1895. The town was founded after Jack Moore and Bill Corning struck a significant lode of silver in 1875.
Remains: Tip Top at its peak had over 500 residents and was one of the largest towns in Arizona at the time. Many ruins still exist in Tip Top today.
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Total Wreck

County: Pima
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°53′44″N 110°35′34″W / 31.89556°N 110.59278°W / 31.89556
Elevation: 4,629 ft (1,411 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1879
Disestablished: 1890
Comments: Total Wreck is a ghost town in Pima County, Arizona. The town was built 7 miles (11 km) from Pantano, Arizona, whence “an excellent road” led from the Southern Pacific Railroad line and on to the Empire Ranch. It lay on the mail route to and from Harshaw.
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Tres Alamos

County: Cochise
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°03′42″N 110°20′40″W / 32.06167°N 110.34444°W / 32.06167
Elevation: 3,445 ft (1,050 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1874
Disestablished: 1886
Comments: Tres Alamos is a ghost town in Cochise County in the U.S. state of Arizona. The town was settled in 1874 in what was then the Arizona Territory.
Remains: In 1768 Spanish soldiers from the Presidio de Tucson farmed the area along the San Pedro River to supply food for the Presidio. Later, in 1830, Mexican farmers settled in the area, establishing more permanent farming operations and transporting their produce through the Redington Pass to Tucson with the protection of soldiers from the Presidio.
Current Status: The Tres Alamos post office was established in 1874 to serve ranchers along the San Pedro River. The post office was eventually closed in 1886. All of the valley settlements and area surrounding them soon became known as Redington.
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Twin Buttes

County: Pima
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°54′15″N 111°04′00″W / 31.90417°N 111.06667°W / 31.90417 -111.06667
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: December 29, 1906
Disestablished: August 15, 1930
Comments: Twin Buttes is a populated place on the east flank of the Sierrita Mountains about twenty miles south of Tucson, in Pima County, Arizona. Named after a prominent hill located next to the town, Twin Buttes was founded as a small mining town around 1903 and abandoned around 1930.
Remains: Although the town died, operations at the Twin Buttes Mine continued for the next several decades until 1994, when the mine was closed. In 2009 Freeport McMoRan acquired the property and has since recommenced mining operations.
Current Status: Much of the actual town site is now buried underneath mine tailings, and all that remains is the Twin Buttes Cemetery.
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Vulture City

County: Maricopa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 33°52′44″N 112°47′42″W / 33.87889°N 112.79500°W / 33.87889
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Vulture City is a ghost town situated at the site of the defunct Vulture Mine in Maricopa County, Arizona, United States. Vulture Mine was a gold mine which was discovered in 1863. It was the most productive gold mine in the history of Arizona. From 1863 to 1942, the mine produced 340,000 ounces of gold and 260,000 ounces of silver.
Remains: After the mine closed, the city was abandoned and its building decayed, becoming a “ghost town”. The deposit was later sold to Benjamin Phelps, who represented a group of investors that eventually organized under the name of Vulture Mining Company. The mine continued to produce at a decreased level until World War II, when it was permanently closed.
Current Status: he buildings and the Vulture Mine are privately owned. The owner offer a two-hour, dirt path guided walking tour at the historic Vulture mine, The tour offers a glimpse of the olden days through a tour of some of the remaining buildings of Vulture City, the once booming mining town.
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Washington Camp

County: Santa Cruz
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°22′56.83″N 110°40′31.18″W / 31.3824528°N 110.6753278°W / 31.3824528
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: May 13, 1880
Disestablished: June 6, 1890
Comments: Washington Camp is a populated place in Santa Cruz County, Arizona. Little remains of the historic mining camp and what does is on private property belonging to the community’s few remaining residents.
Remains: The ruins of the ghost town of Duquesne, Arizona, is a mile southeast of Washington Camp.
Current Status:
Remarks: The post office in Washington Camp was first opened on May 13, 1880, and moved to nearby Duquense on June 6, 1890.

Weaver

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°09′18″N 112°42′25″W / 34.15500°N 112.70694°W / 34.15500 -112.70694
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1863
Disestablished: 1898
Comments: The town of Weaverville was established shortly after the discovery of placer gold deposits on nearby Rich Hill in May 1863. The town was named after mountain man Pauline Weaver, who worked as a guide for the group of prospectors who made the discovery. The gold was discovered by a member of the party while chasing a stray donkey.
Remains: Weaver, or Weaverville, is a former gold mining town, now a deserted ghost town, in Yavapai County, Arizona. All that remains are some rusting mining machinery, a partially restored cemetery, and the ruins of a stone house.
Current Status: A post office was established at Weaver on May 26, 1899, but remained less than a year before it moved to nearby Octave on April 19, 1900.
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Webb

County: Maricopa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 33°33’09N 112°22’02W
Elevation: 1,109 ft (338 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Webb is a populated place situated in Maricopa County, Arizona.
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White Hills

County: Mohave
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°44′17″N 114°23′51″W / 35.73806°N 114.39750°W / 35.73806
Elevation: 2,792 ft (851 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: White Hills is a census-designated place in Mohave County, Arizona, United States. White Hills is 12.5 miles (20.1 km) northwest of Dolan Springs.
Remains: In 1892, Henry Shaffer discovered silver deposits in the area, with the help of local American Indians. The resulting mining efforts led to the creation of the town of White Hills, which reportedly grew to a population of 1,500.
Current Status: Production peaked in 1898, and soon after the mill began operating only half of the time. The town went into decline, and eventually became a ghost town.
Remarks: White Hills received media attention in 2014 when Charles Vacca, a shooting instructor, was accidentally shot and killed by a 9 year-old girl at a local gun range.

Wilford

County: Navajo
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°21′54″N 110°38′44″W / 34.36500°N 110.64556°W / 34.36500
Elevation: 6,709 ft (2,045 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1883
Disestablished: 1926
Comments: Wilford, Arizona was a town in Navajo County, Arizona located approximately 7 miles south of Heber, along Black Canyon Rd. During the 1880s, discouraged Little Colorado River settlers began migrating to the forests of the Mogollon Rim. The town of Wilford was settled in April 1883 by a group of Latter-day Saints from the failed Brigham City settlement. Originally called “Adam’s Valley”, after founder (Jerome Jefferson Adams), the name was changed to “Wilford”, President Wilford Woodruff, fourth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), at a quarterly stake conference in August 1883.
Remains: Numerous families abandoned the settlement at this time. Some residents relocated to nearby Heber, while others joined their friends in Mexico. Wilford ceased being a town by 1889; then consisting of sparsely populated ranches. The last residents moved out in 1926.
Current Status: Today, loose rock foundations are the only physical evidence of the former settlement.
Remarks: By 1888, due to years of overgrazing by the cattle of the Aztec Land & Cattle Company, most of the grassy meadows had become eroded washes.

Wolf Hole

County: Mohave
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°45′46″N 113°32′58″W / 36.76278°N 113.54944°W / 36.76278
Elevation: 5,043 ft (1,537 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Wolf Hole is a ghost town in the Arizona Strip region of Mohave County, Arizona, United States. It consists only of some foundations and a derelict house.
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Zeniff

County: Navajo
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°34′38.8″N 110°22′42.6″W / 34.577444°N 110.378500°W / 34.577444
Elevation: 6,000 ft (1,828.8 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Disestablished:
Comments: Zeniff, Arizona was a town in Navajo County, Arizona located approximately 15 miles SW of Holbrook, Arizona off SR 377, near “Dry Lake”. It was settled in 1911 by the Preston Bushman family with the goal of dry farming. Preston’s father, John Bushman, had previously helped settle Heber, Arizona, and Preston dreamed of staking a claim for himself.
Remains: Following the Bushman’s departure, other family’s began relocating as well. The Hewards sold to the Despains, and the Hunts sold to the Tenneys who in turn sold to the Despains. Eventually the Despains owned a majority of the land. In 1956, Southwest Forest Industries purchased all of the land to build a paper pulp mill with the intent of using the “Dry Lakes” for waste water storage. At this time the land became unlivable due to the offensive odor coming from the lakes.[1] The paper mill ran until September 30, 2012, when it shut down permanently.
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Current Status: Today, three adobe buildings and a set of stone walls are all that remain of Zeniff.
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How Many Ghost Towns Are In Arizona?