Ghost Towns of Arizona (A-C)

Ghost Towns Of Arizona, United States Ghost Towns

Adamana

County: Apache
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°58′36″N 109°49′20″W / 34.97667°N 109.82222°W / 34.97667
Elevation: 5,305 ft (1,617 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1896
Disestablished:
Comments: Adamana is an unincorporated community in Apache County in the northeast section of the U.S. state of Arizona. The town was settled in 1896 in what was then the Arizona Territory. Adamana was founded in 1896 when the railroad was extended to that point.
Remains: Little remains of the original community.
Current Status: A post office was established at Adamana in 1896, and remained in operation until 1969.
Remarks: The town was named for Adam Hanna, a local rancher who was a distant relative of the late Mark Hanna, the original settler of the region. Originally the place was known as Adam Hanna’s, as time passed and more people came to visit, the elision of a few letters gave us the name Adamana.

Adamsville

County: Pinal
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 33° 0′ 46 N, 111° 26′ 31 W
Elevation: 1450 ft
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established:
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Comments: Adamsville was a populated place in Pinal County, Arizona. Once a thriving farm town, it became a ghost town by the 1920s. Adamsville is located at an elevation is 1,450 feet, on the south bank of the Gila River, west of Florence, Arizona.
Remains: The entire settlement was gone by 1920.
Current Status: Abandoned
Remarks: Adamsville was one of the first two towns formed in Pinal County, Arizona. It was named for its original settler in 1866, Charles S. Adams. When a post office was established there in 1871, it was named Sanford, (for a Captain George B. Sanford of the First U.S. Cavalry), by a political enemy of Mr. Adams, Richard McCormick. Local residents continued to use the original name, causing confusion which existed until 1876, when the post office was discontinued.

Agua Caliente

County: Maricopa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32° 59′ 7 N, 113° 19′ 28 W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Agua Caliente in Maricopa County, Arizona, is a place north of the Gila River near Hyder, Arizona. The location was the site of a resort established at the site of nearby hot springs. Agua Caliente, a name derived from Spanish meaning “hot water”, received its name from nearby hot springs which were originally used by the local Indians.
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Remarks: By 1858 Flap-Jack Ranch was located six miles from the Agua Caliente hot springs along the Gila River, 84 miles from Fort Yuma. It was established as stagecoach station of the Butterfield Overland Mail. In 1862, it was called Grinnel’s Ranch and was listed on the itinerary of the California Column in the same place as Flap Jack Ranch, (84 miles), from Fort Yuma on the route to Tucson. So too was what Union Army reports called Stanwix Ranch or Stanwix Station which became the site of the westernmost skirmish of the American Civil War.

Alamo Crossing

County: Mohave
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°15′38″N 113°34′58″W / 34.26056°N 113.58278°W / 34.26056
Elevation: 1,237 ft (377 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1899
Disestablished: 1918
Comments: Alamo Crossing is a ghost town in Mohave County in the northwest part of the U.S. state of Arizona. The town was settled in the late 1890s, in what was then the Arizona Territory. The town was later submerged in order to create Alamo Lake.
Remains: Today, the town is at the submerged at the bottom of Alamo Lake. However, the remains of the city are still intact.
Current Status:
Remarks: Founded by Tom Rodgers in the late 1890s, Alamo Crossing was never a big town. During its heyday, the town only consisted of a five stamp mill and a few stores.

Alexandra

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°15′48″N 112°18′30″W / 34.26333°N 112.30833°W / 34.26333
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: June 1875
Disestablished: 1903
Comments: Alexandra is a ghost town in Yavapai County, Arizona. The ghost town was settled during the frontier days of 1875 as a mining camp until abandoned in 1896. Alexandra is ten miles east of Mayer.
Remains: This became troublesome so eventually Peck built his own mill at Alexandra in 1877. A year later a post office was established. The town boomed and grew to seventy-five to 100 buildings. General stores, saloons, boarding houses, livery stables, a blacksmith and a brewery all existed there. Alexandra was lively until litigation problems began and by 1879 the town was mostly uninhabited and remained so for years. The post office closed in 1896 but in 1903, a new mine shaft was founded at Peck Mine. This did not save the town though, apparently Alexandra never thrived again and became a ghost.
Current Status:
Remarks: Alexandra was founded by E.G. Peck, the owner of the Peck Mine, a famous mining company at the time, T.M. Alexander, William Cole and a man named Curtis Coe Bean. One day in June 1875 while walking through the Bradshaw Mountains, Peck noticed a peculiar rock partly underground. After examination, the rock proved to be pure silver and the first of Alexandra was founded. The town is located in Peck Canyon and was named Alexandra after Mrs. T.M. Alexander, a founder and the first lady to be at the town. A long mountain road separated the town from Mayer. The silver ore produced from the mine was taken via pack train through Bradshaws to Aztlan Mill, thirty miles away.

Algert

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Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Allen

County: Pima
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Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Allen was founded by John Brackett Allen, he named his town after himself. The town was near Quijotoa, Allen is on the western side of the Ben Nexis Mountain and Quijotoa is on the east. When American settlers began flocking to Quijotoa, General Brackett was among them who decided he wanted to build a hotel. So Allen’s hotel was built six miles from Quijotoa and the town of Allen sprang up around it. The hotel, according to sources, served the best liquors in the territory and was also one of the more luxurious hotels on the frontier.
Remains: Allen, also known as Allen City is a ghost town in Pima County in southern Arizona. It was founded fifty miles southeast of Ajo, c. 1880. By 1886, the post office closed and the town has been abandoned since.
Current Status:
Remarks: The small settlement had the hotel, a half dozen houses, a few tents and a post office established in 1880. The population is unknown but likely remained small as Allen no longer had a post office in 1886.

Alto

County: Santa Cruz
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°36′36.50″N 110°52′20.86″W / 31.6101389°N 110.8724611°W / 31.6101389
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Alto is a ghost town in Santa Cruz County, Arizona, first settled in early 1900s in what was then part of the Tyndall Mining District, east of Tubac in the Santa Rita Mountains. The town was originally named El Plomo, which is Spanish for “lead”, and was changed to Alto, meaning “high”, many years later, probably because the mines were located high up on a steep mountainside.
Remains: Alto is a ghost town in Santa Cruz County, Arizona, first settled in early 1900s in what was then part of the Tyndall Mining District, east of Tubac in the Santa Rita Mountains. The town was originally named El Plomo, which is Spanish for “lead”, and was changed to Alto, meaning “high”, many years later, probably because the mines were located high up on a steep mountainside.
Current Status: Abandoned
Remarks:

American Flag

County: Pinal
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°34′48″N 110°43′13″W / 32.58000°N 110.72028°W / 32.58000
Elevation: 4,423 ft (1,348 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1870
Disestablished: 1890
Comments: American Flag is a ghost town in Pinal County, Arizona, five miles southeast of Oracle. The town was established in the late 1870s but shortly after 1890, the town had become abandoned.
Remains: American Flag was founded by prospector Isaac Lorraine as the American Flag mine and mining camp in the late 1870s. In 1881 the town was sold to the Richardson Mining Company of New York. The town was small and had a population of about forty on average. Little is known about the mining camp at this time. Eventually Isaac Lorraine would turn his attention to cattle, where he later built the American Flag Ranch. By 1884, the population was only fifteen so the post office closed a few years later and the town was left unoccupied.
Current Status: Abandoned
Remarks: The post office was moved to the American Flag Ranch headquarters in 1880. The building still stands, and is the oldest surviving territorial post office building in Arizona. The building is now on the National Register of Historic Places, and is preserved by the Oracle Historical Society.

American Ranch

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Angel Camp

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Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Aravaipa

County: Mohave
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32° 57′ 26 N, 110° 21′ 18 W
Elevation: 4596 ft
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Aravaipa, formerly Dunlap, a former populated place, on Arizona Gulch, a tributary of Deer Creek, tributary to Aravaipa Creek north of Klondyke in Graham County, Arizona. Aravaipa lies at an elevation of 4596 feet.
Remains: Originally a ranch headquarters, named Dunlap after Burt Dunlap, the local rancher who established it in 1882. Burt Dunlap was the postmaster of the post office from 1883 until 1892. He also served several terms in the territorial legislature. When it was found there was already a post office with the same name, the Post office and town was renamed after the local Aravaipa Apache. In 1893 the post office was closed.
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Remarks: Aravaipa, a mining and ranching town, boasted a school, store, and a pool hall. Today there are a few buildings and outhouses left.

Aubrey Landing

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°18′00″N 114°04′39″W / 34.30000°N 114.07750°W / 34.30000
Elevation: 646 ft (197 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1860
Disestablished: 1886
Comments: Aubrey Landing, Aubrey City or Aubrey is a ghost town at the mouth of the Bill Williams River in southern Mohave County, Arizona. The town was founded before 1865 and was abandoned sometime after 1886. Aubrey Landing was inundated when Lake Havasu was formed.
Remains: In 1865, a break in copper prices left the town almost deserted. However enough people stayed in Aubrey City and the nearby mines, prompting establishment of the Aubrey post office in 1866. Little had changed though by 1878, the town never grew to the size anticipated by the owners. The town consisted of the usual mining camp structures, as well as a hotel, saloon and a general store. The town supported a small population for almost ten years more. In 1886 the post office closed and the town soon after.
Current Status: The site of this old river landing and mining town is lost below Lake Havasu.
Remarks: The site of Aubrey Landing was passed over by the 1854 expedition of Captain Whipple for the Railroad Survey near the 35th Parallel, and was the location of Camp #33 for the 1858 expedition of 1st Lieutenant Ives, to explore the Colorado River of West in the steamboat Explorer.

Aura

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Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Aztec

County: Yuma
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°48′29″N 113°26′34″W / 32.80806°N 113.44278°W / 32.80806
Elevation: 509 ft (155 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Aztec is a census designated place situated in Yuma County, Arizona. As of July 2015 it had an estimated population of 52. It has an estimated elevation of 509 feet (155 m) above sea level.
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Bellevue

County: Gila
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 33°19′55″N 110°56′36″W / 33.33194°N 110.94333°W / 33.33194
Elevation: 4,692 ft (1,430 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1906
Disestablished: 1927
Comments: Bellevue is a ghost town in Gila County, Arizona, five miles southwest of Miami. The settlement was founded as a mining camp around 1906 when a post office was established. The name of the founder is unknown though the town was built to harbor the Gibson Cooper Mine. The Bellevue-Miami Stagecoach company had a stage there. A boarding house, general store and the post office were among many houses.
Remains: The population got as high 300 before 1927 when the post office closed and the settlement became a ghost town. As of today, the concrete Gibson Cooper mill still stands, along with metal mining equipment. Piles of ore can be found also.
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Big Bug

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°18′54″N 112°04′00″W / 34.31500°N 112.06667°W / 34.31500
Elevation: 3,461 ft (1,055 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1862
Disestablished: 1910
Comments: Big Bug is a ghost town in Yavapai County, Arizona. The former settlement is located twelve miles southeast of Prescott and was established in 1862.
Remains: The Big Bug placers produced a recorded 17,000 troy ounces of gold; the total production was around 50,000 ounces, mostly from dredging in the 1930s and 1940s. Big Bug Creek still has some indication of early mining activities, but little if anything remains of the town as of 2010.
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Remarks: Big Bug has a long history of frontier life. The town was founded by Theodore Boggs during the American Civil War. Boggs’ father was the former governor of Missouri, Lilburn Boggs, who helped drive the Mormons out during the Missouri Mormon War. When he was ten years old he traveled west to California, accompanied partway by the famous Donner Party. His mother was a granddaughter of the pioneer Daniel Boone.

Black Diamond

County: Cochise
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°50’37N 109°54’24W
Elevation: 5,138 ft (1,566 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Black Diamond is a populated place situated in Cochise County, Arizona. It has an estimated elevation of 5,138 feet (1,566 m) above sea level.
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Bonita

County: Graham
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°35’23N 109°58’09W
Elevation: 4,544 ft (1,385 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Bonita is an unincorporated community in Graham County, Arizona, United States. Bonita is located on Arizona State Route 266 2.6 miles (4.2 km) south-southwest of Fort Grant and 22.7 miles (36.5 km) southwest of Safford.
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Bradshaw City

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°11′48″N 112°21′21″W / 34.19667°N 112.35583°W / 34.19667
Elevation: 6,358 ft (1,938 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1860
Disestablished: 1880
Comments: Bradshaw City is a ghost town in Yavapai County, Arizona It served as a mining camp from its founding in 1863 until the late 1880s. “Bradshaw City” is the namesake of its founder, William D. Bradshaw.
Remains: By the end of 1871, miners and prospectors began to move away from Tiger Mine to find work elsewhere. By the 1880s the Tiger mine had played out and Bradshaw city faded. Today, a few foundations and a forest service sign mark the spot where Bradshaw City once stood.
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Remarks: William D. Bradshaw founded Bradshaw City as a mining camp in 1863 after prospectors working on the northwest slope of Mount Wasson discovered gold. The camp began as a loose collection of tents which were soon replaced with hundreds of buildings including dance halls, restaurants, saloons, and hotels as the population inflated to around 5000 people. The town supported the Tiger Mine, situated a short distance from the “Central #26: Crown King Back-road” which serviced the area at the time.

Brigham City

County: Navajo
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°02′31″N 110°41′04″W / 35.04194°N 110.68444°W / 35.04194 -110.68444
Elevation: 4,895 ft (1,492 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1876
Disestablished: 1881
Comments: Brigham City is a ghost town in Navajo County, Arizona, United States. Founded by Latter-day Saints near the present city of Winslow in 1876, it was one and one-half miles north of Winslow’s current city center, along the Little Colorado River. It was organized as a Latter-Day Saints ward in 1878, but by 1881 it had been abandoned.
Remains: Twenty Mormon families and fifteen bachelors from Salt Lake City settled the area, and built homes inside protective walls originally measuring 200 feet (61 m) long and 7 feet (2.1 m) high. Flash flooding that washed away the dams and irrigation systems led to crop failures and caused the abandonment of the town by 1881.
Current Status: Abandoned
Remarks: Brigham City was added to the National Register of Historic Places as of June 9, 1978, and the remnants are currently undergoing restoration. Only one of the communities’ buildings and portions of the encircling wall remain.

Bumble Bee

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°12′03″N 112°09′11″W / 34.20083°N 112.15306°W / 34.20083
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Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Bumble Bee is a ghost town in the Bradshaw Mountains of Yavapai County, Arizona, United States, named for nearby Bumble Bee Creek. Established in 1863, Bumble Bee served as a stagecoach stop and an outpost for the U.S. Cavalry, with a post office established in 1879. The creek, and by extension the town, were so named because early travelers in the area claimed that the Indians there were as “thick as bumblebees.”
Remains: With the demise of the stagecoach and the mining in the surrounding area, the site eventually faded away. An attempt by Jeff Martin to make the town a tourist attraction during the mid-1930s resulted in the construction of the current buildings. In 1960, retired magazine publisher Charles A. Penn purchased the site and tried once again to establish a tourist attraction and museum. Penn died before his plans came to fruition and the property reverted to private ownership. Many of the faux historic buildings have since been torn down and smaller homes have been built in their place.
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Calabasas

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Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1837
Disestablished: 1866
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Camp Crittenden

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Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1867
Disestablished: 1873
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Canelo

County: Santa Cruz
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°32′34″N 110°30′52″W / 31.54278°N 110.51444°W / 31.54278
Elevation: 4,990 ft (1,521 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1696
Disestablished: 1924
Comments: Canelo is a ghost town in eastern Santa Cruz County, Arizona, between the Canelo Hills and the northern end of the Huachuca Mountains. The site lies along Turkey Creek on Arizona State Route 83, between Sonoita and Parker Canyon Lake, which is about ten miles to the south-southeast in Cochise County.
Remains: Today, several historic buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places remain standing in Canelo, including a one-room schoolhouse and a United States Forest Service ranger station.
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Remarks: Canelo Ranger Station was established in 1932 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993. Five historic buildings are located on the site, including the ranger station office.

Canyon Diablo

County: Coconino
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°09′46″N 111°07′04″W / 35.16278°N 111.11778°W / 35.16278
Elevation: 5,433 ft (1,656 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Canyon Diablo (Navajo: Kin Ligaaí) is a ghost town on the Navajo Reservation in Coconino County, Arizona, United States on the edge of the arroyo Canyon Diablo. The town, which is about 12 miles northwest of Meteor Crater, was the closest community to the crater when portions of the meteorite were removed. Consequently, the meteorite that struck the crater is officially called the “Canyon Diablo Meteorite.
Remains: The original pillars the bridge was mounted on were excavated from the surrounding Kaibab Limestone and shaped on site by Italian stonemasons. The ruins of the lodgings of the railroad workmen are on the west end of the bridge site. Although the railroad ended at the edge of the canyon, work on the railroad route still progressed. Crews were sent ahead to survey the route, prepare the grade and bed, cut and prestage railroad ties and other supplies in advance of the iron rails that would accompany the trains once the canyon was spanned when the new bridge arrived. Work quickly progressed until the A&P crew linked up with the Southern Pacific Railroad crews at Needles, California on August 9, 1883.
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Remarks: The ramshackle community originated in 1880, due to construction delays attributed to the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad ordering the wrong span length railroad bridge across the canyon. The bridge story is that the original bridge when ordered was not long enough to span Canyon Diablo, and this was only discovered when the bridge arrived on site from the manufacturer. Consequently, for six months the transcontinental railroad ended at the lip of Canyon Diablo while another bridge was manufactured and shipped to the work site.

Cascabel

County: Cochise
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°17′29″N 110°22′46″W / 32.29139°N 110.37944°W / 32.29139
Elevation: 3,195 ft (974 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: The name Cascabel derives from Spanish for “rattle”, because an early settler killed a large rattlesnake here. Cascabel was a small farming community. The post office was started by Alex Herron, a small ranch and store owner, in 1916. When deciding what to name the Cascabel post office, Herron, while on the way to Benson, met a Mexican man with a dead rattlesnake. Herron asked what the name of the snake was and the man replied “Cascabel.” This was the name Herron decided to name the post office.
Remains: The post office was in operation until 1936.
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Castle Dome

County: Yuma
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°57′54″N 114°27′49″W / 32.96500°N 114.46361°W / 32.96500
Elevation: 203 ft (62 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1869
Disestablished: 1978
Comments: Castle Dome Landing, Arizona (also Castle Dome City) is a ghost town in the Castle Dome Mountains of Yuma County in the U.S. state of Arizona. It was first settled as a transport depot and mining camp around 1863 in what was then the Arizona Territory.
Remains: The remains of Castle Dome Landing, once on the banks of the Colorado River, are now submerged beneath the Imperial Dam reservoir in Martinez Lake. The property that was previously Castle Dome town and mining camp was purchased in 1994 by Allen and Stephanie Armstrong, and turned into the Castle Dome Museum.
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Remarks: As with many mining boomtowns, mining activity diminished, and the Castle Dome Landing post office closed down on June 16, 1884. The mines reopened in 1890, and the area became a significant source of lead for both World War I and World War II. In particular, when the Arizona Lead Company reopened the mines in 1943, they were able to produce significant amounts of lead in order to meet wartime demands.

Castle Dome Landing

County: Yuma
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°57′54″N 114°27′49″W / 32.96500°N 114.46361°W / 32.96500
Elevation: 203 ft (62 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1869
Disestablished: 1978
Comments: Castle Dome Landing, Arizona (also Castle Dome City) is a ghost town in the Castle Dome Mountains of Yuma County in the U.S. state of Arizona. It was first settled as a transport depot and mining camp around 1863 in what was then the Arizona Territory
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Chaparral

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Charleston

County: Cochise
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°38′9″N 110°10′21″W / 31.63583°N 110.17250°W / 31.63583
Elevation: 3,989 ft (1,216 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1879
Disestablished: 1888
Comments: Charleston is a ghost town in Cochise County in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Arizona. It was occupied from the late-1870s through the late-1880s, and was located in what was then known as the Arizona Territory. Located on the west bank of the San Pedro River, Charleston’s economy was based on milling silver ore mined from nearby Tombstone in the community of Millville, located directly across the river.
Remains: When the silver mines in Tombstone flooded in 1886, the mills were forced to shut down, and Charleston and Millville went into steep decline. The large Sonoran earthquake that struck on May 3, 1887, accompanied by more than thirty minutes of aftershocks, left all of the town’s adobe structures in ruins, and sealed the town’s fate.
Current Status: The town was quickly abandoned as none of the structures remained habitable. The Charleston Post Office shut down on October 24, 1888, and by 1889, both Charleston and Millville were already ghost towns.
Remarks: After it was abandoned, Charleston was briefly inhabited in the 1890s by a small population of Mexican immigrants who furthered the town’s dismantling by using what was left of the wooden structures for kindling.

Catoctin

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Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1094
Disestablished: 7502
Comments: Catoctin in Yavapai County, Arizona was a small gold mining camp. The camp was established around 1902 and received a post office on December 29 of the same year. It is located on upper Hassayampa River, sixteen miles southeast of Prescott, Arizona.
Remains: Only a handful of mining buildings and homes were constructed and on average the town was home to about twenty people. The Catoctin and Climax mines were nearby. On July 15, 1920 the post office was closed.
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Cedar

County: Mohave
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°46′43″N 113°47′40″W / 34.77861°N 113.79444°W / 34.77861
Elevation: 4,459 ft (1,359 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: September 24, 1895
Disestablished: July 31, 1911
Comments: Cedar was a gold, silver and copper mining town in Mohave County, Arizona. It was founded around 1875 on the east slope of the Hualapai Mountains, sixty miles southeast of Kingman.
Remains: A post office was established on September 24, 1895 and closed on July 31, 1911. In addition to the post office there were two saloons, and a general store with several homes.
Current Status: In 1907 the Cedar Valley Gold & Silver Company along with the Yucca Cyanide Mining & Milling Company reported that about 200 people lived in the town, within a decade later the site was abandoned.
Remarks: A half mile area inside Cedar Valley is littered with stone ruins and foundations of the mining buildings.

Cerbat

County: Mohave
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°18′11″N 114°08′23″W / 35.30306°N 114.13972°W / 35.30306
Elevation: 3,865 ft (1,178 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: December 23, 1872
Disestablished: June 15, 1912
Comments: Cerbat is a ghost town just west of the Cerbat Mountains in Mohave County, Arizona. Mining in the area began in the late 1860s and a camp was established soon after. Cerbat was built in a canyon 38 miles (61 km) from Hardyville, Arizona.
Remains: The town was prosperous and contained several mining and public buildings along with cabins for over 100 settlers, as well as a school, a doctor’s office and a lawyer’s office. In the 1870s the town was connected by dirt road to Fort Rock, Camp Hualapai and Prescott, Arizona. Cerbat was the third seat of Mohave County until 1877 when Mineral Park took the title.
Current Status: As of 2010, a cemetery and a few wooden buildings and stone foundations, including a large mill and the post office, remain. The post office was completed on December 23, 1872 and was closed on June 15, 1912.
Remarks: From June 25, 1890 to October 24, 1902 the town was known as Campbell.

Cerro Colorado

County: Pima
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°39′32″N 111°16′21″W / 31.65889°N 111.27250°W / 31.65889 -111.27250
Elevation: 3,668 ft (1,118 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: April 17, 1872
Disestablished: April 15, 1911
Comments: Cerro Colorado is a ghost town in southern Pima County, Arizona. The town is located off Arivaca Road, near Arivaca, and is best known for the massacre of mining employees by Mexican outlaws and buried treasure.
Remains: Cerro Colorado was established around 1855 by Charles D. Poston, who owned the Sonora Exploring & Mining Company in Tubac, Arizona. The most prosperous mine in the area was the Heintzelman Mine, named after Major General Samuel P. Heintzelman, who was the first president of the mining company and later grew famous during the American Civil War. The post office was established on April 17, 1879, and closed on April 15, 1911.
Current Status:
Remarks: In 1861, fifteen Mexican and Native American men were killed after being buried alive in their shaft when the roof caved in. The men were deep within the shaft so no rescue was possible or attempted, this frightened the Mexican employees who felt the mine was haunted so they left and went home to Sonora. Several German and American miners then became employed.

Cherry

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°35′17″N 112°02′31″W / 34.58806°N 112.04194°W / 34.58806
Elevation: 5,143 ft (1,568 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Cherry is a mining ghost town in central Yavapai County, Arizona, United States, between Dewey and Camp Verde, located at an elevation of 5143 feet.
Remains: At present, Cherry is a small retirement and vacation-home community. A number of the original buildings are still in use. The Cherry cemetery has several graves from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
Current Status:
Remarks: Cherry’s post office was established March 3, 1884 and discontinued March 15, 1943. Notable mines in the area include the Federal, Bunker, Sunnybrook, Logan and Gold Bullion mines. About 400 people lived and worked in Cherry during its prime.

Chloride

County: Mohave
Zip Code: 86431
Latitude / Longitude: 35°24′52″N 114°11′58″W / 35.41444°N 114.19944°W / 35.41444
Elevation: 4,022 ft (1,226 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1863
Disestablished:
Comments: Chloride is a onetime silver mining camp in Mohave County, Arizona, and is considered the oldest continuously inhabited mining town in the state.
Remains: Prospectors first located mineral resources in the area in the 1840s, including silver, gold, lead, zinc, and turquoise. Chloride was founded about 1863, but mining was not widespread until the 1870s after a treaty was signed with the Hualapai Indians. The railway from Kingman, called the Arizona and Utah Railway, was inaugurated on August 16, 1899 – the last silver spike was driven by Miss May Krider.
Current Status: The town eventually grew to a peak of around 5,000 inhabitants, and at one time Chloride was the county seat. By 1917 the population had fallen to 2,000, and by 1944 it was nearly a ghost town.
Remarks: American author Louis L’Amour visited Chloride sometime between 1927 and 1929 after the Weepah, Nevada goldrush, where he had bought, and then sold, a claim for $50.

Cleator

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°16′43″N 112°13′59″W / 34.27861°N 112.23306°W / 34.27861
Elevation: 3,501 ft (1,067 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Cleator /’kli?t?r/ is a ghost town in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States. It lies along the road that has replaced Murphy’s Impossible Railroad between Cordes and Crown King.
Remains: Cleator was established in 1864 as a placer gold mining site under the name Turkey Creek Mining District. A post office was established at Turkey Creek in July 1869 but closed within three months.
Current Status: Cleator’s population fell in the 1920s as mining in the area declined and the town was put up for sale by James Cleator in April 1949. It then had about 60 residents. James P. Cleator’s son Thomas bought the town and lived there until his death in 1996. He kept the small bar open most of the years he lived there. After his death everything was inherited by his sister Eleanor and her son. The bar is still open and a favorite stop along the dusty road for recreational ATV drivers and weekend tourists.
Remarks: Turkey Creek was renamed Cleator in 1925 after James P. Cleator took possession of the town from Levrett P. Nellis. He then named the post office after himself. The post office closed July 15, 1954.

Clemenceau

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°43’55N 112°01’36W
Elevation: 3,471 ft (1,058 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Clemenceau is a neighborhood of the city of Cottonwood in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States. It was built as a company town in 1917 to serve the new smelter for James Douglas, Jr.’s United Verde Extension Mine (UVX) in Jerome. The town was originally named Verde after the mine, but it was changed to Clemenceau in 1920 in honor of the French premier in World War I, Georges Clemenceau, a personal friend of Douglas. Clemenceau would later leave a vase designed by the French potter Ernest Chaplet to the town in return.
Remains: Originally named Verde, the town was renamed Clemenceau in 1920, both to honor Georges Clemenceau and to avoid possible confusion with nearby Camp Verde. Though now a part of the city of Cottonwood, Verde as it was known had its own post office and station on the Clarkdale branch of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad.
Current Status:
Remarks: The smelter town had homes for workers, a school, bank, and a clubhouse, and its population varied between 1,000 and 5,000. To deliver ore to the smelter from Jerome, Douglas built the Arizona-Extension Railway, a two-branch shortline railroad. The western branch ran between Clemenceau and the eastern portal of the 2.5-mile (4.0 km) Josephine Tunnel.

Cochise

County: Cochise
Zip Code: 85606
Latitude / Longitude: 32°06′49″N 109°55′18″W / 32.11361°N 109.92167°W / 32.11361
Elevation: 4,222 ft (1,287 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Cochise is an unincorporated community located in Cochise County, Arizona, United States. The city was created alongside the Southern Pacific Railroad in the 1880s. The city was primarily a stop for coal and water which were needed for trains at the time.
Remains: At its peak, the town had a population of approximately 3,000 people. Today, only 50 people still live in Cochise. The town is also home to several historic locations. In 1899, Big Nose Kate, the famed sidekick of Doc Holliday, lived in Cochise while she was working at the Cochise Hotel after Holliday’s death.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Cochran

County: Pinal
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 33°06′34″N 111°08′59″W / 33.10944°N 111.14972°W / 33.10944
Elevation: 1,640 ft (500 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1905
Disestablished: 1915
Comments: Cochran is a ghost town in Pinal County in the U.S. state of Arizona. The town was settled in 1905, in what was then the Arizona Territory.
Remains: Named after its first postmaster, John S. Cochran, the small mining camp also served as a stop on the Santa Fe, Prescott and Phoenix Railway. The post office was established on January 3, 1905, and was discontinued on January 15, 1915. At its peak, the town was home to approximately one hundred residents, and housed a general store and a boardinghouse, among other establishments.
Current Status: Apart from a few building foundations in the town center, and the train tracks that still run by the edge of the now-abandoned town site, Cochran’s last and most notable remains are a set of five largely intact beehive coke ovens across the Gila River at Butte, Arizona.
Remarks: The Coke Ovens are on a 189-acre section of private property, visitation is not allowed.

Colorado City

County: Yuma
Zip Code: 86021
Latitude / Longitude: 36°59’22N 112°58’41W
Elevation: 4,977 ft (1,517 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1913
Disestablished:
Comments: Colorado City is a town in Mohave County, Arizona, United States, and is located in a region known as the Arizona Strip. According to the 2010 census, the population of the town was 4,821. At least three Mormon fundamentalist sects are said to have been based there.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks: Colorado City, formerly known as Short Creek (or the Short Creek Community), was founded in 1913 by members of the Council of Friends, a breakaway group from the Salt Lake City-based The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

Congress

County: Yavapai
Zip Code: 85332
Latitude / Longitude: 34°8′46″N 112°50′48″W / 34.14611°N 112.84667°W / 34.14611
Elevation: 3,045 ft (928 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Gold was discovered at Congress in 1884. By 1893, the Santa Fe, Prescott and Phoenix Railway passed within three miles of the mine, at Congress Junction. Congress boomed, and remained prosperous until the mid-1930s, when the mines closed. Total gold production at the Congress Mine exceeded $8 million, at the then-current price of $20.67 per ounce—or about $400 million, at the 2007 price.
Remains: Congress is a census-designated place (CDP) in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States. Once a gold-mining center and then a ghost town, Congress now serves as a retirement and bedroom community for nearby Wickenburg. The population was 1,717 at the 2000 census.
Current Status: The post office moved to Congress Junction in 1938, where it remains. The community now known as Congress is the old Congress Junction. Little remains at the original townsite.
Remarks:

Contention City

County: Cochise
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31°46′8″N 110°12′7″W / 31.76889°N 110.20194°W / 31.76889
Elevation: 3,799 ft (1,158 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1880
Disestablished: 1888
Comments: Contention City or Contention is a ghost mining town in Cochise County in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Arizona. It was occupied from the early-1880s through the late-1880s in what was then known as the Arizona Territory.
Remains: Only a few foundations now remain of this boomtown which was settled and abandoned with the rise and fall of silver mining in and around the area of Tombstone.
Current Status: Contention City is today part of the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area (San Pedro RNCA) maintained by the Bureau of Land Management. All that remains today are scattered adobe walls, cellar holes, rows of fence posts, and the remnants of a small cemetery. Visitors can hike to the townsite on BLM-maintained paths along the San Pedro River.
Remarks: Contention’s rail depot became superfluous when rail service was extended late in 1882 to Fairbank, 4 miles south, and thus closer to Tombstone. The discovery of water at Tombstone allowed the erection of mill sites there rendering the San Pedro River mill sites superfluous; when the Contention Mine and the silver mines in Tombstone flooded in 1886 and 1887 after the 1887 Sonora earthquake, the mills were forced to shut down, and Contention City suffered a fatal blow. The population began to leave, and the post office shut down on November 26, 1888. Other than a handful of local ranchers, the town was gone by 1890.

Copper Creek

County: Pinal
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 32°45′03″N 110°28′35″W / 32.75083°N 110.47639°W / 32.75083
Elevation: 3,983 ft (1,214 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Copper Creek is a ghost town in Pinal County, Arizona, United States. Copper Creek is located in a canyon in the Galiuro Mountains.
Remains: This town once had around 50 buildings. It had a peak population of approximately 500. Its post office was established March 6, 1906 and was disestablished August 31, 1942. A short-lived narrow-gauge railway line was built in 1913, with the locomotive and cars carried overland from the railhead at Winkelman.
Current Status: Notable remains of the old town include the foundations of the post office and the shell of the Sibley Mansion.
Remarks: The Copper Creek mining district contains a substantial copper deposit; in recent years, several companies have proposed opening a mine there.

Cordes

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°18′12″N 112°10′01″W / 34.30333°N 112.16694°W / 34.30333
Elevation: 3,763 ft (1,147 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Cordes is a ghost town located eight miles southeast of the area of Mayer in Yavapai County, Arizona, United States. Cordes was established in 1883 by John Henry Cordes.
Remains: The town was originally destined to be called Antelope Junction, however, Cordes’ application for a post office in that name was denied in 1883. The reason was that there was already an Antelope Station in Arizona. That town is now called Stanton. The second name that Cordes chose was his own, which was approved. The Cordes post office closed in 1944 and the town was abandoned in the 1950s.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Courtland

County: Cochise
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 31° 46′ 12 N, 109° 48′ 31 W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: March 13, 1909
Disestablished: September 30, 1942
Comments: Courtland is a ghost town in Cochise County, Arizona, that was founded in 1909 due to a copper boom. The town is located at the foot of the Dragoon Mountains, about fifteen miles northeast of Tombstone, and was named after Courtland Young, one of the owners of the Great Western Mining Company.
Remains: The boom did not last long. Within ten years the profits from the mines began to shrink, and in 1921 a “mass exodus” occurred. At first the Dragoons seemed to be rich in copper. Beginning in 1917, one mine shaft after another tapped into a layer of limestone 300 feet down. This eventually led to abandonment of the mines, although a post office remained open until September 30, 1942.
Current Status: Today, the Courtland Jail is the only structure left
Remarks: A post office was established on March 13, 1909, and during that year the Courtland Arizonian printed its first newspaper. At its height, Courtland had a population of 2,000. By the time it became a ghost town there was a car dealership, an ice cream parlor, a movie theater, a baseball field and a horse racing track, and more necessary buildings, such as houses, hotels and county branch jail. The Chamber of Commerce was formed in 1911 and the first item on the agenda was to supply the town with water. Within a matter of months, five miles of water mains were installed by the newly formed Courtland Water and Ice Company.

Crown King

County: Yavapai
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°12′20″N 112°20′19″W / 34.20556°N 112.33861°W / 34.20556
Elevation: 5,771 ft (1,759 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1875
Disestablished: May 15, 1954
Comments: The site of a former gold mining town, Crown King is 28 miles west of Interstate 17 on Senator Highway, high in the Bradshaw Mountains. The community is named after the Crowned King mine, but the name was shortened to Crown King in 1888. Horsethief Basin Lake resides 6.5 miles southeast of Crown King on Crown King Rd/Forest 259 Rd.
Remains: The red one-room schoolhouse was built in 1917 and still serves a small number of K-8 students. High school students typically leave town to attend class 14 miles away in Mayer.
Current Status: Of the buildings still standing and in use in Crown King, the Crown King Saloon has maintained its place as the center of activity in town. The Saloon was originally constructed and operated in the nearby mining town of Oro Belle (now also a ghost town). In 1910, It was disassembled and brought to Crown King piece by piece after the mine at Oro Belle had played out. The building was home to a brothel and bar in both towns and now serves the public as a hotel, cafe, and bar.
Remarks: The post office was established on July 29, 1888, and was discontinued on May 15, 1954. It has since reopened inside the Crown King General Store.

Curtis

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (NO DST) (UTC-7)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
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How Many Ghost Towns Are In Arizona?