Ghost Towns of Texas (T-Z)

Ghost Towns Of Texas, United States Ghost Towns

Tarrant, TX

County: Hopkins
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Tascosa, TX

County: Oldham
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°31’52″N 102°15’20″W
Elevation: 3,192 ft (973 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1876
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Comments: Tascosa, sometimes called Old Tascosa, is the former capital of ten counties in the Texas Panhandle. The town emerged briefly in the 1880s as an economic rival of Dodge City, Kansas. Located in Oldham County northwest of Amarillo, Texas, Tascosa is now a ghost town.
Remains: Tascosa, named for a nearby creek, was rooted in a local crossing of the Canadian River which cowboys passed on their way to the railhead and cattle markets in Dodge City. The role of Tascosa was comparable as a regional center to that of Mobeetie in Wheeler County further east. Tascosa was a town of tents and adobe, with a stone court house erected in 1884 at a cost of $18,000. It reached its peak in 1888 with cattle, farming, dairying, and general merchandising.
Current Status: The coming of the Fort Worth and Denver Railway was expected to revitalize Tascosa. However, there were two miles of deep sand between the railroad track and the town. Though the editor of The Tascosa Pioneer believed the citizens could overcome all odds against them, this physical limitation proved insurmountable.
Remarks: By the 1930s, the town was almost deserted. In 1938, Cal Farley’s Boys Ranch was built on the site. The old courthouse (now a museum) and the 1889 schoolhouse are the only buildings from the old town to survive into the 21st century. Tascosa was the setting for the showdown between Lin McAdams (Jimmy Stewart) and Dutch Henry Brown (Stephen McNally) in the 1950 American western film, Winchester 73.

Tee Pee City, TX

County: Motley
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°0’17.77″N 100°38’22.58″W
Elevation: 2,165 ft (660 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Tee Pee City is a ghost town located in eastern Motley County near Matador, Texas. The ghost town is near the confluence of Tee Pee Creek and the Middle Pease River in eastern Motley County. The site, originally a Comanche campground, derived its name from the numerous teepee poles found up and down the creek by early settlers.
Remains: The Tee Pee City settlement was established in 1875 as a trading post serving buffalo hunters and surveying parties. Charles Rath and Lee Reynolds moved wagons, cattle, mules, and dance-hall equipment from Dodge City to establish the post but soon moved on to the Double Mountain Fork Brazos River, leaving their hide-dealer representatives Armstrong and Sharp in charge. Until his death in 1884 Isaac Armstrong served as proprietor of the two-room picket building, which had a hotel in one room and a saloon complete with dance-hall girls in the other. Armstrong was buried on a nearby sandhill. By 1878 the buffalo herds, victims of the Sharps buffalo rifle, were gone from the area and the buffalo hunters with them. The families of R. V. Fields and A. B. Cooper settled in Tee Pee City in 1879. Cooper freighted supplies from Dallas and ran the general store, first from a dugout and later from a one-room rock house. The post office was established in 1879 with Cooper as postmaster; it was abandoned in 1900. The Tee Pee City school, one of the first schools in the area, met from 1895 until 1902, by which time most of the settlers, save for the Cooper family, had left. The wide-open settlement, scene of shoot-outs, drunken brawls, and robberies, often warranted the attention of George W. Arrington’s group of Texas Rangers based at Camp Roberts in Blanco Canyon.
Established: 1875
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Current Status: All that remained at the site in the 1980s was a 1936 Texas historical marker and the gravestones of Armstrong, two children (James Motley Cooper and Nellie Elizabeth Cooper), and their aunt, Mrs. A. S. Johnson. Tee Pee City received a historic marker in 1936.
Remarks: The lawlessness of this town eventually led to its downfall and then later to a ban of cowboys. “The management of the Matador Land and Cattle Company considered Tee Pee City such a bad influence that the settlement was declared off-limits to its cowboys, and when the opportunity arose in 1904, the ranch bought the land and closed Tee Pee City down.

Tehuacana, TX

County: Limestone
Zip Code: 76686
Latitude / Longitude: 31°44’32″N 96°32’44″W
Elevation: 640 ft (195 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Tehuacana is a town near the Tehuacana Hills in Limestone County, Texas, United States. From 1869 until 1902, the town was home to Trinity University.
Remains: A post office called Tewockony Springs was established in what is now known as Tehuacana in 1847. It was named for the Tawakoni Indians, who lived in the area until the late 1840s. In 1850, the town came in second in an election held to decide the new Texas state capitol, which Austin ultimately won. When Tehuacana Academy opened in 1852, the community was known as Tehuacana Hills, though the post office continued to be called after the springs. The post office was discontinued during the Civil War, but service resumed in 1869, at which time the name of the office was changed to Tehuacana.
Current Status: The population was 283 at the 2010 census.
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Telegraph, TX

County: Kimble
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Latitude / Longitude: 30°19’39″N 99°54’22″W
Elevation: 1,854 ft (565 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Telegraph is a ghost town on Texas State Highway 377, thirteen miles 13 miles (20 km) southwest of Junction, in Kimble County, Texas, United States.
Remains: LBJ biographer Robert A. Caro notes that “the town had no telegraph; it had been given its name because telegraph poles had been cut from trees near there during the 1850s.” Ruth Holmes was appointed the first postmaster, when Telegraph was assigned a post office on February 17, 1900. By the 1890, there were ranches in the surrounding area of the Texas Hill Country. During the 1920s, camping on the river near Telegraph was a popular vacation spot for campers, hunters, and fishermen, with the only building of the town serving as the residence/country store/post office (which closed in 2009). In 1925, Telegraph had rental cabins on the river, a gas station-post office-general store (residence of the post master).
Current Status: The general store and post office, built 1890-1900, was designated a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark in 1996, Marker number 5219. Telegraph was about a mile from the ranch built by Governor Coke Stevenson, known as “Mr. Texas.” At its peak in 1966, the town had a trade population of 56 people, made up of people living in the cedar brakes and on the ranches surrounding Telegraph, using its post office.
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Telico, TX

County: Ellis
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Latitude / Longitude: 32° 22′ 20″ N, 96° 30′ 45″ W
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Comments: Telico is an unincorporated community in east central Ellis County, Texas, United States.
Remains: The area that became Telico was settled before 1856. It was first called Trinity City, but was renamed in the mid-1850s to Telico after Telico, North Carolina.
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Tennyson, TX

County: Coke
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Terlingua, TX

County: Brewster
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Latitude / Longitude: 29°19’17″N 103°36’57″W
Elevation: 2,891 ft (881 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Terlingua (/t”r’l””gw”/ t”r-LING-gwa) is a mining district and census-designated place (CDP) in southwestern Brewster County, Texas, United States. It is located near the Rio Grande and the villages of Lajitas and Study Butte, Texas, as well as the Mexican village of Santa Elena. The discovery of cinnabar, from which the metal mercury is extracted, in the mid-1880s brought miners to the area, creating a city of 2,000 people. The only remnants of the mining days are a ghost town of the Howard Perry-owned Chisos Mining Company and several nearby capped and abandoned mines, most notably the California Hill, the Rainbow, the 248, and the Study Butte mines. The mineral terlinguaite was first found in the vicinity of California Hill.
Remains: According to the historian Kenneth Baxter Ragsdale, “Facts concerning the discovery of cinnabar in the Terlingua area are so shrouded in legend and fabrication that it is impossible to cite the date and location of the first quicksilver recovery.” The cinnabar was apparently known to Native Americans, who supposedly used its brilliant red color for pictographs.
Current Status: The population of Terlingua as of the 2010 census was 58.
Remarks: Terlingua features in Wim Wenders’ movie Paris, Texas. Travis is brought there to the German physician. Terlingua was the focus of the 2015 National Geographic Channel show “Badlands, Texas.” The reality show followed the case surrounding the 2014 murder of Glenn Felts.

Texana, TX

County: Jackson
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Latitude / Longitude: 28° 54′ 36″ N, 96° 33′ 36″ W
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Comments: Texana, Texas is a ghost town which was located in Jackson County near Edna. The community was one of the earliest Anglo-American settlements in the state. The town flourished as late as 1880, but when the railroad bypassed the town, it rapidly declined. The site now lies under the Lake Texana reservoir.
Remains: In 1832 Dr. Francis F. Wells and his sister-in-law, Pamelia McNutt Porter, founded a community in south central Jackson County that later developed into Texana. The village was originally named Santa Anna after Antonio López de Santa Anna, at the time a popular Mexican liberal, soldier, and politician. In 1835, however, after Santa Anna had proven himself an enemy of republican government, the residents of the settlement changed the name to Texana. During the Texas Revolution of 1835-1836, Texana served as a port of entry and training camp for many volunteers from the United States. Dr. Jack Shackelford’s company of Alabama Red Rovers camped around Texana for about two weeks before joining James Fannin’s command at Goliad. In the spring of 1836 the citizens of Texana joined the Runaway Scrape. “Uncle” Jeff Parson, a slave during the Runaway Scrape, told how the “old town of Texana was abandoned, not an individual was left on Jackson County soil, all were in flight, where they were going no one knew.”
Current Status: Lake Texana, a reservoir on the Navidad River, currently covers the ghost town, as a result of the construction of the Palmetto Bend Dam, which was finished in 1979. The lake currently serves as a recreational destination for visitors. The dam and the lake are managed by the Lavaca-Navidad River Authority.
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Texla, TX

County: Orange
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Latitude / Longitude: 30° 13′ 13″ N, 93° 52′ 52″ W
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Comments: Texla is a ghost town in northern Orange County, Texas, United States, in the southeastern part of the state. It is located northwest of Orange, just west of Mauriceville. The site was originally called Bruce, after the postmaster Charles G. Bruce when the office opened in 1905. The first sawmill to operate there was known as the Harrell-Votaw Lumber Company with a close proximity to the Orange and Northwestern Railway. The following year, the R. W. Wier Lumber Company out of Houston took over operations. The site (and the post office) was renamed Texla, due to its proximity to Louisiana. The owner Wier sold out to the Miller-Link Lumber Company in 1917. The peak population of the town reached an estimated 600 residents. In 1918 the mill was destroyed by fire, but was rebuilt in 1919 with a double-circular mill of the same size.
Remains: From 1945 until 1977, a sawmill operated under the name Texla Lumber Company in nearby Mauriceville, according to the Texas Forestry Museum.
Current Status: Within a year, the Peavy-Moore Lumber Company of Deweyville took ownership, and operated the site until the nearby timber became exhausted. In 1929, the mill was dismantled and the site was abandoned.
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Texon, TX

County: Reagan
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Latitude / Longitude: 31° 13′ 30″ N, 101° 41′ 22″ W
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Comments: Texon is a small unincorporated town in Reagan County, Texas, United States, in the western part of the state. The town is noted for its boom as an oil town and subsequent near abandonment.
Remains: The town originates from May 23, 1923, when oil was discovered. The town was named for the Texon Oil and Land Company, which drilled the first successful oil well in the Permian Basin. On December 4, 1928, under the supervision of Carl G. Cromwell, Texon Oil discovered the Santa Rita University 1-B, at that time the world’s deepest well at 8,525 feet. Texon Oil and Land Company developed the Santa Rita oil field. Texon’s leases were subsequently purchased by M. L. “Mike” Benedum and Joe Trees of Pittsburgh, who formed the Big Lake Oil Company.
Current Status: The population in 1996 was estimated at less than 10. At its peak in 1933, the town had approximately 1,200 inhabitants. The town is located in Reagan County. It is 3 /10 mile (0.5 km) south of U.S. Route 67 on RM 1675. It is 85 miles west of San Angelo, Texas. Texon was served by the Kansas City, Mexico and Orient Railway.
Remarks: Texon was considered a model oil community. A grade school, a church, a hospital, a theater, a swimming pool, a golf course, and tennis courts were built by the Big Lake Oil Company. The Texon Oilers, a semi-professional baseball team, were started. Privately owned businesses appeared, including a drug store, a cafe, a boarding house, a tailor-shop, dry-goods and grocery stores, barber and beauty shops, a service station, a dairy, an ice house, and a bowling alley.

The Grove, TX

County: Coryell
Zip Code: 76528
Latitude / Longitude: 31°16’24″N 97°31’31″W
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Comments: The Grove is an unincorporated community in Coryell County, Texas, United States. It is located some sixteen miles southeast of Gatesville, Texas in the eastern portion of the county. The Grove is located on Texas State Highway 36. The area is known for its abundance of Texas Bluebonnet flowers during the spring months.
Remains: The Grove was established around 1859 and was named for a grove of Texas Live Oak trees nearby. By the late 1860s the community had two general stores, a mill and a cotton gin. In 1870 a group of Wendish settlers from Weigersdorf, Germany arrived. They established St. Paul Lutheran Church (which exists to this day). By this time, there were also Baptist, Methodist, Disciples of Christ and Presbyterian churches in the community. In 1874 the post office was established. J. B. Coleman was the first postmaster.
Current Status: Today the St. Paul Lutheran Church is still active in the community. The old church cemetery is a few miles away on Highway 36. Many of the town’s original buildings are still standing on Main Street, and several have been restored to their former glory. On many weekends, local bands perform on Main Street. Though The Grove, Texas Museum is now closed, it is still deemed an historical Texas town by the Smithsonian Institution and was the cover story in the 11 August 2008 issue of Forbes magazine. The population of The Grove has varied over the years from a peak of 400 around the turn of the century to about 65 in 2000.
Remarks: Between 1880 and 1900, the community continued to grow with three general stores, two grocery stores and a population of 150. By the first decade of the 1900s the community had a two-teacher public school (with 60 students) and a Lutheran private school. During the 1940s the community began to decline when it was bypassed by Highway 36. In the late 1940s several local farmers were forced to relocate due to the construction of the North Fort Hood training center of Fort Hood. Due to population declines, the public school in The Grove was closed in 1948, while the Lutheran school continued to operate until 1962.

Three Oaks, TX

County: Wilson
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Thurber, TX

County: Erath
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Latitude / Longitude: 32°30’26″N 98°25’2″W
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1886
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Comments: Thurber is an unincorporated community in Erath County, Texas, United States (near the Palo Pinto county line), located 75 miles west of Fort Worth. It was, between 1888 and 1921, one of the largest producers of bituminous coal in Texas and the largest company town in the state, with a population of over 10,000.
Remains: Coal-mining operations began in Thurber in 1886 and reached a peak around 1920, when the town had a population of approximately 8,000 to 10,000, from more than a dozen nationalities, though Italians, Poles, and Mexicans predominated. At the peak, Thurber was one of the largest bituminous coal-mining towns in Texas. Established as a company town, the mining operations in Thurber were unionized in 1903 and Thurber became the first totally closed shop town in the country. The Texas and Pacific Coal Company was not owned by the Texas and Pacific Railway, but it lay near its line and provided the trains of that company with much fuel. The Texas and Pacific Coal Company created a subsidiary company, Texas Pacific Mercantile and Manufacturing Company, to operate its mercantile operation, with company-run retail outlets like the grocery, dry goods, hardware, and drug stores, as well as saloons and other establishments.
Current Status: The population of the community is 48 per the 2010 United States Census.
Remarks: Nationwide, there are several thousands of people whose roots go back to Thurber. There are several landmarks in Thurber such as The Thurber Cemetery (which has over a thousand graves), the restored St. Barbara’s Catholic Church, a restored and furnished coal miner’s house, New York Hill, and much more. A historic Thurber smokestack can clearly be seen from Interstate 20 near Thurber. Also at Thurber is the W. K. Gordon Center for Industrial History of Texas, a museum containing information on historical Thurber (operated by nearby Tarleton State University), as well as the historic Smokestack Restaurant, and the New York Hill Restaurant built on what was once the site of the town’s Episcopal Church at the top of New York Hill.

Tiemann, TX

County: Guadalupe
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Tokio, TX

County: Terry
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Latitude / Longitude: 33° 10′ 53″ N, 102° 16′ 31″ W
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Comments: Tokio is an unincorporated community in Terry County, Texas, United States.
Remains: The town of Tokio was founded in 1908, and relocated a mile south to the current location in 1928 when US highway 380 was redirected. Although reaching a population of at least 125 residents in the 1940s, Tokio lies mostly in ruins today. A historical marker stands in front of the old Tokio School.
Current Status: According to the Handbook of Texas, the community had an estimated population of 24 in 2000.
Remarks: Another Texas community named Tokio (also called Wiggins) is located in McLennan County, near West, Texas.

Tolbert, TX

County: Wilbarger
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Towash, TX

County: Hill
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Toyah, TX

County: Reeves
Zip Code: 79785
Latitude / Longitude: 31°18’48″N 103°47’35″W
Elevation: 2,913 ft (888 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Toyah is a town in Reeves County, Texas, United States.
Remains: On October 26, 1926 a black man in Toyah named Slab Pitts was dragged to death and then hanged for living with his white wife, Eva. One newspaper reported the killing as “Cowboys of Southwest Summarily Punish a Worthless Negro by Rope Method.”
Current Status: The population was 90 at the 2010 census.
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Toyahvale, TX

County: Reeves
Zip Code: 79786
Latitude / Longitude: 30°56’40″N 103°47’22″W
Elevation: 3,323 ft (1,013 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Toyahvale is an unincorporated community in southern Reeves County, Texas, United States. It lies along State Highway 17 and FM 3078 south of the city of Pecos, the county seat of Reeves County. Despite its similar name, Toyahvale is distinct from the town of Toyah, which lies 25 miles (40 km) to the north. Its elevation is 3,323 feet (1,013 m). Although Toyahvale is unincorporated, it has a post office, with the ZIP code of 79786.
Remains: Toyahvale’s name is a portmanteau: its first half is of a local Indian word for “flowing water”, combined with “vale”. The community was established after 1884, but its first post office was not opened until 1894; the office closed in 1931, but reopened in 1933. Today, the community lies at the western end of the Pecos Valley Southern Railway and is the location of Balmorhea State Park.
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Trickham, TX

County: Coleman
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Tucker, TX

County: Anderson
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Latitude / Longitude: 31°40’25″N 95°44’53″W
Elevation: 292 ft (89 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Tucker is an unincorporated community in Anderson County, located within the U.S. state of Texas.
Remains: The community’s first church, named Green Bay African Methodist Episcopal Church, came together by a group of African Americans who worked in the cotton plantation in nearby Long Lake. It had two separate neighborhoods: Prairie Point, where the community’s White residents lived, and Green Bay, where the community’s Black inhabitants resided. The International and Great Northern Railroad had a track built through the settlement in 1872, and a post office by the name of Prairie Point was established in 1873. Both it and the community changed their name to Tucker, in which a family with the same last name owned land and operated a general store in the community in 1882.
Current Status: According to the Handbook of Texas, the community had a population of 304 in 2000. It is located within the Palestine, Texas micropolitan area.
Remarks: Tucker sits approximately 2 mi (3.2 km) away from the Trinity River, as well as along the intersection of U.S. Highway 84 and U.S. Highway 79 on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, 8 mi (13 km) southwest of Palestine in the southwestern portion of Anderson County.

Tuckertown, TX

County: Navarro
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Tuff, TX

County: Bandera
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Tuleta, TX

County: Bee
Zip Code: 78162
Latitude / Longitude: 28°34’22″N 97°47’48″W
Elevation: 325 ft (99 m)
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Comments: Tuleta is a census-designated place (CDP) in Bee County, Texas, United States.
Remains: Tuleta was founded by Peter Unzicker, a Mennonite minister, who brought a colony of Mennonites from Cullom, Illinois, in 1906. Unzicker, a German, purchased 54.5 acres (22.1 ha) of land from the Chittim-Miller ranch for the townsite, which was named for J. M. Chittim’s daughter. The San Antonio and Aransas Pass Railway was built across the ranch in 1881. The depot opened in Tuleta in 1906; the following year the post office opened. The Mennonite church, built that year, was used for school on weekdays. In 1910, Amanda Stoltzfus organized the Tuleta Agriculture High School, the first of its kind in Texas; its faculty came from such prestigious institutions as Smith College and the University of Wisconsin. Stoltzfus, the principal, offered instruction in sewing and cooking for girls and manual training and agriculture for boys. The school had dormitories for boarders.
Current Status: The population was 288 at the 2010 census.
Remarks: Tuleta once had three churches-Mennonite, Presbyterian, and Baptist-of which only the Baptist remained in 1990. Among the early businesses were Stoltzfus Mercantile Company and Gin, Unzicker Grocery and Grist Mill, Dirks Brothers Lumber Yard and Garage, Speer’s Coffee Shop, the Rapp Hotel, and the Hall Hotel. Oil and gas were discovered west of Tuleta in 1929, when the population was 150. Several oil companies were still in operation in 1990, as were a grocery store, a water well service, and a community center. The community celebrates Tuleta Day on the second Saturday in August. In 1989, its population was 189. In 1990, it was 98. The population reached 292 in 2000.

Turpentine, TX

County: Jasper
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Twin Sisters, TX

County: Blanco
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Latitude / Longitude: 30°00’10″N 98°24’19″W
Elevation: 1,276 ft (389 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Twin Sisters is an unincorporated community in western Blanco County, Texas, United States. Its post office closed in 1948.
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Union Valley, TX

County: Wilson
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Unity, TX

County: Wilson
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Upland, TX

County: Upton
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Upton, TX

County: Bastrop
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Latitude / Longitude: 30° 0′ 41″ N, 97° 15′ 51″ W
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Comments: Upton is an unincorporated community in Bastrop County, Texas, United States.
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Utica, TX

County: Smith
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Comments: Utica is a ghost town in Smith County, located in the U.S. state of Texas.
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Vandenburg, TX

County: Medina
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Verbeba, TX

County: Garza
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Vieja Springs, TX

County: Presidio
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Virginia City, TX

County: Bailey
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Comments: Virginia City was a ghost town in southwest Bailey County, Texas, United States “Virginia City was located two miles southeast of the present intersection of Farm roads 298 and 1731 in southwest Bailey County, twenty-five miles southwest of Muleshoe. It was platted on March 13, 1909, by Matthew C. Vaughn and Samuel D. McCloud. The original townsite called for a lot reserved for a courthouse and others for schools, churches, and a park. The same year it was platted, an Iowa land company bought the site and advertised for prospective buyers. A hotel was built to house visitors, and several stores were established. A roadbed for a railroad was graded through the town, although it was disputed whether the construction was genuine or merely a speculation trick. The venture failed, and the town was abandoned by 1913.”
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Waring, TX

County: Kendall
Zip Code: 78074
Latitude / Longitude: 29°57’3″N 98°48’11″W
Elevation: 1,345 ft (410 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Although Waring is unincorporated, it has a post office, with the ZIP code of 78074; the ZCTA for ZIP Code 78074 had a population of 59 at the 2000 census. The community is part of the San Antonio Metropolitan Statistical Area.
Remains: Waring is an unincorporated community in northwestern Kendall County, Texas, United States. It lies along local roads and the Guadalupe River, northwest of the city of Boerne, the county seat of Kendall County. Its elevation is 1,345 feet (410 m).
Current Status: Founded in 1887 by R.P.M. Waring, the community was named for its founder’s hometown of Waringford in Ireland; the name was not changed until 1901. From its foundation until service ceased in 1970, the community was a station on the Kerrville branch of the San Antonio and Aransas Pass Railway.
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Warren, TX

County: Fannin
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Comments: Warren was a town in present-day Fannin County, Texas, United States, the site of Fort Warren in the early 19th century. It lay near the border with Grayson County on the Red River. Warren was the county seat of Fannin County when that county was established in 1837. However, when the county seat was moved to Bonham in 1843, Warren began a period of decline. It served as a logistical station for the Confederacy during the American Civil War, but was bypassed by the railroad after the war. As a result it eventually became uninhabited; its post office closed in 1876.
Remains: The original courthouse was removed from Warren in the 1920s with an eye toward moving it to Bonham as a historic landmark, but this was never completed.
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Washington-on-the-Brazos, TX

County: Washington
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Latitude / Longitude: 30°19’26.35″N 96°09’12.75″W
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Comments: Washington-on-the-Brazos is an unincorporated area along the Brazos River in Washington County, Texas, United States. Founded when Texas was still a part of Mexico, the settlement was the site of the Convention of 1836 and the signing of the Texas Declaration of Independence. The name “Washington-on-the-Brazos” was used to distinguish the settlement from “Washington-on-the-Potomac”—i.e., Washington, D.C.
Remains: Founded largely by immigrants from the southern United States, Washington-on-the-Brazos is known as “the birthplace of Texas” because it was here that, on March 1, 1836, Texas delegates met to formally announce Texas’ intention to separate from Mexico and to draft the constitution of the new Republic of Texas. They organized an interim government to serve until a government could be elected and inaugurated.
Current Status: The Barrington Living History Farm is a living museum homestead that represents the mid-19th-century farm founded by Dr. Anson Jones, the last President of the Republic of Texas. Costumed interpreters raise cotton, corn, cattle and hogs using period techniques. The 1844 Anson Jones Home was moved to the site in 1936 as part of the Texas Centennial Celebration. The reconstructed outbuildings include two slave cabins, a kitchen building, a smokehouse, a cotton house and a barn. The farmstead opened in 2000, and is operated by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.
Remarks: Located between Brenham and Navasota off State Highway 105, the site is now known as Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic Site. It covers 293 acres (119 ha), and features three main attractions: Independence Hall, Barrington Living History Farm, and the Star of the Republic Museum, which is administered by Blinn College. The site’s visitor center is free and includes interactive exhibits about the Texas Revolution and the park’s attractions, a gift shop, a conference center and an education center.

Wasp Creek, TX

County: Kendall
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Wastella, TX

County: Nolan
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Latitude / Longitude: 32°30’37″N 100°38’58″W
Elevation: 2,392 ft (729 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1908
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Comments: Wastella is a ghost town in northwest Nolan County, Texas, United States. Wastella is located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 84 and Farm to Market Road 1982 approximately 8 mi (13 km) northwest of Roscoe. It lies within the physiographic region known as the Rolling Plains to the southeast of the high plains of the Llano Estacado.
Remains: Wastella is a ghost town in northwest Nolan County, Texas, United States. Wastella is located at the intersection of U.S. Highway 84 and Farm to Market Road 1982 approximately 8 mi (13 km) northwest of Roscoe. It lies within the physiographic region known as the Rolling Plains to the southeast of the high plains of the Llano Estacado.
Current Status: Wastella grew slowly and was never very large but at one time it had a couple of stores, a hotel, a school, and a post office that opened in 1907. Despite its key location along the Roscoe, Snyder and Pacific Railway, Wastella suffered from its close proximity to more significant towns such as Snyder, Roscoe, and Hermleigh. The post office closed in the early 1930s. In 1980 and 1990 the population was thirteen, and the population dropped to only four in 2000.
Remarks: Wastella was platted eight miles northwest of Roscoe on land provided by Will Neeley when the Roscoe, Snyder and Pacific Railway was constructed in 1908. Neely named the town site for his eldest daughter, Wastella.

Watson, TX

County: Red River/Comanche
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Wayside, TX

County: Lynn
Zip Code: 79373
Latitude / Longitude: 33°19’37″N 101°48’26″W
Elevation: 3,169 ft (966 m)
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Comments: Wayside is a small unincorporated community in Lynn County, Texas, United States. Today, the community is best described as a ghost town with only a few farms and ranches scattered across the area.
Remains: In the state of Texas, there are six small communities that share the name Wayside. On the high plains of the Llano Estacado we have Wayside (Armstrong County), Wayside (Roberts County), and Wayside (Lynn County). The other three communities, which lie in Central Texas, include Wayside (Bastrop County), Wayside (Wood County) and Wayside (Panola County).
Current Status: The remnants of Wayside (Lynn County) lie on the high plains at an altitude of 3,169 feet (966 m) in north-central Lynn County at the intersection of Farm to Market Road 211 and U.S. Highway 87. The nearest major city is Lubbock, Texas, located 25 mi (40 km) to the north.
Remarks: Wayside (Armstrong County) is located approximately 100 miles (161 km) to the north and Wayside (Roberts County) is approximately 270 miles (435 km) to the north-northeast of Wayside (Lynn County).

Welfare, TX

County: Kendall
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Latitude / Longitude: 29°55’18″N 98°47’12″W
Elevation: 1,348 ft (411 m)
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Comments: Welfare, Texas, is an ghost town 4 miles (6.4 km) southeast of Waring on the Waring-Welfare Road in west-central Kendall County, in the U.S. state of Texas. The school was designated a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark in 2000.
Remains: Adelsverein colonists Carl Joseph and Augusta Beseler, along with their sons Ernst and Carl Philipp, emigrated to Texas in 1848. The family settled on Carl’s land grant and opened a general store. The community of Welfare grew up around the general store. The Beselers’ son Ernst died in the Nueces Massacre on August 10, 1862. His brother Carl Philipp was justice of the peace, postmaster, county commissioner, and tax assessor. The general store was designated a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark in 1996, Marker number 382.
Current Status: The community had 275 residents by 1892. Severe weather conditions, complicated by an infestation of boll weevils caused a steady decline in the population. U.S. Highway 87 bypassed Welfare in 1930, and the railroad was abandoned in 1970. What is left of Welfare is only accessible by the Waring-Welfare country road. The Waring-Welfare country road is accessible via the Welfare Exit (Exit 533) of Interstate 10. German pioneer and founder of Sisterdale, Nicolaus Zink, retired to Welfare and died there in 1887. He was buried on his own property. Welfare became a ghost town in 2014.
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Wenasco, TX

County: Jasper
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White City, TX

County: Gaines
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White Way, TX

County: Hamilton
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Who’d Thought It, TX

County: Hopkins
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Comments: Who’d Thought It was a farming community in northern Hopkins County, Texas. The community was located near Farm to Market Road 1536 east of Tira and north of Sand Hill. It was most likely settled after 1900; the origins of its name are unknown. Who’d Thought It had two stores and several houses at one point before World War II; the stores eventually closed, and by the 1980s Who’d Thought It had become a ghost town.
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Whon, TX

County: Coleman
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Wild Cat Bluff, TX

County: Anderson
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Comments: Wild Cat Bluff is a Ghost town in northwestern Anderson County, Texas, United States.
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Williams Ranch, TX

County: Mills
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Latitude / Longitude: 31°29’53″N 98°38’22″W
Elevation: 1,200 ft (400 m)
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Comments: Williams Ranch is the oldest settlement in Mills County, Texas, now a ghost town, with the oldest known cemetery in the vicinity dating back to the mid-19th century. The location is about 3 miles (4.8 km) south of Mullin, and 8 miles (13 km) northwest of Goldthwaite, the county seat. When originally settled, Williams Ranch was located in the far southern portion of what is now Brown County. (Mills County was formed in 1887.)
Remains: Around 1855, a John Williams from North Carolina was passing through the area and decided to camp for the night beside a spring on Mullin Creek. Impressed with the location, he bought some land from a fellow whose last name was Williams(W. W. Williams) decided to stay and established a ranch on the springs. The reason the town is called Williams Ranch- because all of John Williams sons had Ranches there. During the next ten years, a community grew around Williams Ranch consisting of a number of homes, a hotel, a general store, a school and a number of other businesses including a stage stop. A post office operated in Williams Ranch from 1877 to 1892. The reason the town died was out of greed, because the railroad was going to go through there, but the people raised the price of their lands to high, so the railroad bypassed Williams Ranch, Texas. Outlaw John Wesley Hardin met Deputy Sheriff Charles Webb in Williams Ranch about a month before Hardin killed Webb. By the 1880s, the community had about 250 residents. Its demise began when it was bypassed by the Santa Fe Railroad in 1885 but more for the reason of the feud that existed between the town’s original settlers and its newcomers.
Current Status: Today, there is ample evidence of what was once a thriving ranching community including a well-maintained cemetery. The Allen family presently own property adjacent to the cemetery and are local historians.
Remarks: Williams Ranch is sited near Mullin Creek, which rises in central Mills County and runs southwest for 12 miles to join on Brown Creek. The settlement served as a stage stop on The Wire Road, a dirt road running from Austin to Fort Phantom Hill near Abilene named for the telegraph line which was the first communication line between Austin and the military outpost. The local terrain is characterized by steep slopes and benches, surfaced by shallow clay loams or sandy soils, which support juniper, live oak, mesquite, and grasses.

Winkleman, TX

County: Waller
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Wintergreen, TX

County: Karnes
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Comments: Wintergreen is a ghost town in northeastern Karnes County, Texas, United States. It once stood at the intersection of the Victoria-San Antonio Roads and the lower Helena-Gonzales Roads. Wintergreen appeared on maps from 1858 to 1868, including an 1865 Civil War map.
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Woodward, TX

County: LaSalle
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Yegua, TX

County: Washington
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Zeirath, TX

County: Jasper
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Comments: Zeirath is a ghost town in eastern Jasper County, Texas, United States. The town was located along the Gulf, Beaumont and Kansas City railroad between Jasper and Kirbyville. It disappeared sometime in the 1920s.
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Zella, TX

County: McMullen
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Ziler, TX

County: Howard
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Zodiac, TX

County: Gillespie
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Latitude / Longitude: 30°13’29″N 98°47’37″W
Elevation: 1,594 ft (486 m)
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Comments: Zodiac is a vanished Mormon settlement established in 1847 on the Pedernales River, located 4 miles (6.4 km) southeast of Fredericksburg, in Gillespie County, in the U.S. state of Texas. The area it was located on eventually converted to private acreage, and no trace of the settlement remains today. It was the first Mormon colony established by Lyman Wight in Texas. The second settlement was Mormon Mill, Burnet County, Texas in 1851, and his third and final settlement was Mormon Camp in 1854 in Bandera County. In 1936, Zodiac was designated a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, Marker number 10133.
Remains: Wight led a group of 200 followers into Texas in 1845. The group first entered Texas at Grayson County, at a site known as Mormon Grove, where they spent the winter months before moving on during the spring thaw, arriving in Austin in June 1846. The Mormons hired themselves out as laborers to help build the city jail. After constructing a sawmill and gristmill on the Colorado River, the group migrated towards the Texas Hill Country.
Current Status: After the departure of the Mormons, the area saw a succession of Germans, English and Danish colonists. Before and during the Civil War the area formerly known as Zodiac became a slave labor cotton farm, purportedly the only slave labor cotton plantation in Gillespie County. If that claim is accurate, this is possibly the property on which future Texas State Senator Matthew Gaines was forced to work as a runaway slave during the Civil War. In the 1860 census, Gillespie County had thirty-three slaves.
Remarks: The Rocky Hill school was built in 1885, and Zodiac was renamed for the school. The cemetery was plowed over and destroyed. The area is located on private property.

Zorn, TX

County: Guadalupe
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Latitude / Longitude: 29°45’11″N 97°56’53″W
Elevation: 538 ft (164 m)
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Comments: Zorn is an unincorporated community in northern Guadalupe County, Texas. Zorn is located on Texas State Highway 123 approximately 13 miles (21 km) north of the town of Seguin.
Remains: The small town of Zorn was named for the storekeeper Joseph Zorn. Joseph Zorn also served as mayor of Seguin from 1890 to 1910. In the late 1800s Zorn had a population of 150 and two grist mills.
Current Status: The population was sixty as of 2000.
Remarks: Buried in Zorn is the Arkansas Democratic politician Monroe Schwarzlose, who polled 31 percent of the vote as a protest against Bill Clinton in the 1980 gubernatorial primary.

Zuehl, TX

County: Guadalupe
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Latitude / Longitude: 29°29’30″N 98°9’10″W
Elevation: 584 ft (178 m)
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Comments: Zuehl (/zi”l/ zeel) is an unincorporated area and census-designated place in western Guadalupe County, Texas, United States. It is part of the San Antonio Metropolitan Statistical Area. Located on Cibolo Creek, it lies 13 miles (21 km) southwest of Seguin.
Remains: Once known as “Perryman’s Crossing”, it was a crossing on the Wood Road, an early road between Gonzales and San Antonio. Wilhem Zuehl bought the land in 1870 and two years later opened a store, from which the community took its name.
Current Status: The population was 362 at the 2010 census.
Remarks: Zuehl is located on the western edge of Guadalupe County at 29°29’30″N 98°09’10″W (29.491600, -98.152772). The western border of the CDP follows Cibolo Creek, which is also the Bexar County line. Zuehl is bordered to the north by the city of Cibolo and to the east by New Berlin. Interstate 10 runs just north of the northern border of Zuehl, within Cibolo, and with access from Exit 595. I-10 leads east 13 miles (21 km) to Seguin, the Guadalupe County seat, and west 21 miles (34 km) to San Antonio. According to the United States Census Bureau, the Zuehl CDP has a total area of 7.0 square miles (18.2 km2), all of it land.

How Many Ghost Towns Are In Texas?