Ghost Towns of Florida (N-P)

Great Seal of The State of Florida In God We Trust

Naranja (Inhabited)

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Latitude / Longitude: 25°31′N 80°25′W / 25.517°N 80.417°W / 25.517
Elevation: 7 ft (2 m)
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Narcoossee (Inhabited)

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Negro Fort

County: Franklin
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Comments: Fort Gadsden Historic Memorial is located in Franklin County, Florida, on the Apalachicola River. The site contains the ruins of two forts – the earlier and stronger Negro Fort, built by the British and destroyed by a lucky cannonball, and Fort Gadsden. The site has been known by several other names at various times, including Prospect Bluff Fort, British Post, Nicholls Fort, Blount’s Fort, Fort Blount, African Fort, and Fort Apalachicola.
Remains: Listed in the National Register of Historic Places, the Fort Gadsden Historic Memorial is located in Apalachicola National Forest and is managed by the U.S. Forest Service. It was named a National Historic Landmark in 1972. When the British evacuated Florida in the spring of 1815, they left the well-constructed and fully armed fort in the hands of their allies, about 400 fugitive slaves, including members of the disbanded Corps of Colonial Marines, and a sizable number of native Indians. News of the “Negro Fort” (as it came to be called) attracted as many as 800 black fugitives who settled in the surrounding area. The blacks developed plantations extending up to 50 miles along the river. A report from 1812 mentions over 36 cleared acres and 1,200 cattle.
Current Status: In 1818 General Jackson directed Lieutenant James Gadsden to rebuild the fort, which he did on a nearby site. Jackson was so pleased with the result that he named the location Fort Gadsden. It was abandoned in 1821, the year Florida became a U.S. territory and there was no longer a national border to defend. During the American Civil War, Confederate troops occupied the fort until July 1863, when an outbreak of malaria forced its abandonment.
Remarks: In September 1815, US Indian Agent Benjamin Hawkins sent a group of 200 men to attack the fort at Prospect Bluff. The attack failed, thereby lulling the inhabitants of into a false sense of security. Under the command of a black man known only as Garçon (French for “boy”) and a Choctaw chief, whose name is completely unknown, the inhabitants of Negro Fort launched raids across the Georgia border. The fort, located as it was near the U.S. border, was seen as a threat to Southern slavery. The U.S. considered it “a center of hostility and above all a threat to the security of their slaves.”

Neilson

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Newhall

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New Troy

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Newnansville

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Latitude / Longitude: 29°48′31″N 82°28′36″W / 29.80861°N 82.47667°W / 29.80861
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Comments: The Newnansville Town Site was where the town of Newnansville was located. It is approximately 1.5 miles northeast of Alachua, Florida, on S.R. 235 off of US 441. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on December 4, 1974.
Remains: In 1824, only five years after Florida became a United States territory (and the same year that Alachua County itself was created), Congress authorized the construction of its first federal highway. It would connect Pensacola to St. Augustine. The Territorial Council commissioned John Bellamy, a Monticello planter, to build it. The project took two years to complete, at a cost of $20,000. The route would become known as the Bellamy Avenue. It was a major highway until the Civil War, when other roads became preferred routes. A few of the places it passed were: the town of Traxler, the Santa Fe Taloca Spanish Mission, and what would become Newnansville.
Current Status: Two major factors contributed to its continuing decline. In 1884 the Savannah, Florida, and Western Railroad bypassed it by a mile and a half to the southwest. A new town, Alachua, grew up there. Then in the winter of 1886, a major freeze ruined the citrus crop. This, plus the lack of railway connections, led businesses and residents to move to the prospering communities of Alachua and Gainesville. By the middle of the twentieth century, all that was left of Newnansville were two cemeteries and the remains of a road.
Remarks: Following that, the town flourished, becoming the center for trade and plantation life in the area. It mainly produced corn, cotton, and, after the Civil War, citrus. Not including a period between 1832 and 1839, Newnansville was the Alachua County seat until 1854. At that time, it was relocated to the newly created railroad town of Gainesville. The courthouse was moved to Gainesville as well in 1856. This was the beginning of the end for Newnansville.

Newport

County: Wakulla
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Latitude / Longitude: 30°12′N 84°11′W / 30.200°N 84.183°W / 30.200
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Comments: Newport is a small unincorporated community in Wakulla County, Florida, United States of America, situated where U.S. Highway 98 meets State Road 267.
Remains: In 1841, the current Newport area and the community of Port Leon, just south, endured a severe yellow fever epidemic. In 1843 Port Leon, located on the St. Marks River, was devastated by a hurricane that produced a 10 foot storm surge. The area still struggles against the same recurring hurricane surges that move up the St. Marks River entrance. After the hurricane of September 13, 1843, washed away all of the homes, buildings and railroad tracks in Port Leon promoters Nathaniel Hamlin, James Ormond, Peter H. Swain and several others met a week later and made plans to establish another town.
Current Status: In 1856, the Pensacola and Georgia Railroad obtained controlling interest in the Tallahassee-St. Marks Railroad. The new company improved the tracks and replaced the mules with a steam locomotive that cut travel time from nearly five hours to two hours. Newport has Newport Springs, a sulfur spring said to have healing properties. The spring empties into the St. Marks River. Below the springs there are a series of caves. Wakulla County has taken over maintenance of Newport Springs.
Remarks: They spent several days searching for a site safe from the sea, then selected a piece of land on the west side of the St. Marks River, about two miles below the old town of Magnolia, Florida. This location offered high ground, fewer swamps, and beautiful bubbling springs. It was owned by the Apalachicola Land Co. The organization permitted citizens who had suffered from the storm to draw lots at a cost of $25 and up. The promoters named this new town Newport and platted it with four streets running east and west. The streets were New, Washington, Market and Adams. Those that extended north and south bore the names Bay, Pine, Elm and West. These street names were remarkably similar to those in St. Joseph, Florida territorial Florida’s largest town, about 80 miles to the west down the coast.

Nittaw

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Oakgrove

County: Escambia
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Latitude / Longitude: 30°54’32″N 87°25’39″W
Elevation: 262 ft (80 m)
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Comments: Oak Grove is an unincorporated community in Escambia County, Florida, United States.
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Okeelanta

County: Palm Beach
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Latitude / Longitude: 26°36.6′N 80°42.6′W / 26.6100°N 80.7100°W / 26.6100
Elevation: 10 ft (3.0 m)
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Comments: Okeelanta is an unincorporated community in Palm Beach County, Florida, United States, located approximately 4 miles (7 km) south of South Bay on U.S. Route 27 at County Road 827. The name is a blend of Lake Okeechobee and Atlantic Ocean.
Remains: Old Town is an unincorporated community in Dixie County, Florida, United States, located at US 19-ALT 27-98 and State Road 349.
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Old Bethel

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Old California

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Old Providence

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Old Town

County: Dixie
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Latitude / Longitude: 29°36′04″N 82°58′55″W / 29.6011°N 82.9819°W / 29.6011
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Comments: City of Hawkinsville, a shipwreck in the Suwannee River, near the Nature Coast Trail State Park Old Town Methodist Church built in 1890, located behind the 1983 church building. Old Town Elementary School, now the Dixie County Cultural Center
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Current Status: Olympia Heights is a census-designated place (CDP) in Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States. The population was 13,488 at the 2010 census.
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Old Venus

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Olympia

County: Miami-Dade
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Latitude / Longitude: 25°43’35″N 80°20’42″W
Elevation: 7 ft (2 m)
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Ona

County: Hardee
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Latitude / Longitude: 27°28′55″N 81°55′08″W / 27.48194°N 81.91889°W / 27.48194
Elevation: 89 ft (27 m)
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Comments: Ona is an unincorporated community and census-designated place in Hardee County, Florida, United States.
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Current Status: Its population was 314 as of the 2010 census. Ona has a post office with ZIP code 33865, which opened on October 11, 1897. State Road 64 and a CSX Transportation line pass through the community.
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Orange Center

County: Orange
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Latitude / Longitude: 28°23′43″N 81°30′11″W / 28.39528°N 81.50306°W / 28.39528
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Comments: Vineland is an unincorporated community in southwest Orange County, Florida, United States, located just north of Interstate 4 along State Road 535 and continues along County Road 435, which is South Apopka Vineland Road. The name is no longer often used since the more well-known City of Lake Buena Vista lies just to the south and west. Orange County officially calls the area Buena Vista North or Orange Center, its original name. Mailing addresses for residents in the area are typically Orlando, Florida except many businesses in the area use Lake Buena Vista as their address. The area is most famous due to the name appearing on a large number of major Orange County roads, including Apopka-Vineland Road, Winter Garden-Vineland Road, Kissimmee-Vineland Road and Taft-Vineland Road. There was also a small town which was abandoned in the 1960s called Vineland. An ACL Railway Depot, Housing, a schoolhouse, a church, the Vineland Cemetery, and many more community facilities were a part of the original town. These roads begin/terminate in the area known as Vineland and Lake Buena Vista, Florida.
Remains: Vineland is mainly residential, with a mosque Jama Masjid of Orlando, a synagogue, Southwest Orlando Jewish and four shopping center areas with 15 plus restaurants and several hotels and time share resorts, and the eastern entrance to Walt Disney World on Hotel Plaza Blvd. being other land uses. There are about 50 houses in the neighborhood, apartment complex, Mobile Home park (55 yr,+). It is part of the Orlando–Kissimmee Metropolitan Statistical Area.
Current Status: The area was given the name Orange Center when it was platted in 1911. Previously it had the name Englewood, probably given to it by the Florida Midland Railroad. The name was changed to Vineland in 1924, supposedly due to confusion with Orange City, Florida. A Post Office opened at Orange Center in 1912, and was renamed Vineland in 1918. The Vineland Post Office closed in 1940.
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Orleans

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Orsino

County: Brevard
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Latitude / Longitude: 28°21′28″N 80°41′5″W / 28.35778°N 80.68472°W / 28.35778
Elevation: 3 ft (1 m)
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Comments: Merritt Island is a census-designated place in Brevard County, Florida, located on the eastern Floridian coast, along the Atlantic Ocean. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 34,743. It is part of the Palm Bay – Melbourne – Titusville, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area. The name “Merritt Island” also refers to the extent of the former island, which is now a peninsula.
Remains: Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge and NASA’s John F. Kennedy Space Center are located on the northern part of Merritt Island. The southern area is heavily residential, with centralized light commercial and light industrial areas. The island does not belong to any official city. The central part of Merritt Island, previously known as Merritt City, is home to the majority of the population and includes the local high school, library, and shopping district.
Current Status: Merritt Island owes its name to the king of Spain. The entire island was part of a land grant given by the king to a nobleman named Merritt.
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Ortona

County: Glades
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Latitude / Longitude: 26° 48′ 47″ N, 81° 18′ 56″ W
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Comments: Ortona is an unincorporated area and a populated place in Glades County in the U.S. state of Florida. One of the area’s attractions is the Ortona Mounds and the hiking trail through that area. The prehistoric mounds, canoe canals and earthworks were constructed by Native Americans across a five-square-mile region along the north side of the Caloosahatchee River. The site is located on SR 78, north of LaBelle.
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Osceola

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Latitude / Longitude: 30°17’26″N 82°19’18″W
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Comments: Osceola National Forest is a National Forest located in Florida. Osceola National Forest was created by President Herbert Hoover’s proclamation, on July 10, 1931. It is named in honor of the Native American Seminole warrior, Osceola.
Remains: The forest is made up of approximately 200,000 acres (810 km2) of pine flatwoods and cypress-hardwood swamps in northeastern Florida and is about 50 miles (80 km) west of Jacksonville. It is located in parts of Columbia, Baker, Bradford, and Hamilton counties. The forest is headquartered in Tallahassee, as are all three National Forests in Florida, but there are local ranger district offices located in Olustee. There is one officially designated wilderness area in the forest, the 13,660 acres (55.3 km2) Big Gum Swamp Wilderness.
Current Status: A 28-mile (45 km) section of the Florida National Scenic Trail is included in the park grounds. Other hiking trails in the park include: Olustee Battlefield Trail (an American Civil War battlefield), Trampled Track Trail, and Mt. Carrie Trail. There are two horseback riding trails through open pine flatwoods and near scenic bays. The park is also open to hunters and fishermen with permits.
Remarks: Within the forest is the Osceola Research Natural Area, designated a National Natural Landmark in December 1974. Osceola National Forest is home to many species including the alligator, bobcat, black bear and red-cockaded woodpecker an endangered species.

Oslo

County: Indian River
Zip Code: 32962
Latitude / Longitude: 27° 35′ 0″ N, 80° 23′ 0″ W
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Comments: First settled circa 1883, Oslo is an unincorporated community in southeastern Indian River County, Florida, United States. It is part of the Sebastian–Vero Beach Metropolitan Statistical Area. The town of Oslo, as it was once called, was first established by some of Indian River County’s first pioneers, which included the Helseth, Gifford, and Hallstrom families. The area was given the name Oslo by the Helseth family, and was named after the Norwegian capital city.
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Osowaw Junction

County: Okeechobee
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Latitude / Longitude: 27° 34′ 46″ N, 80° 50′ 5″ W
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Comments: Osowaw Junction is a ghost town in Okeechobee County, Florida, United States located about 9 miles away from Yeehaw Junction.
Remains: In 1914 a train station was built here several miles north of Fort Drum in the Kissimmee Valley Extension line of the Florida East Coast Railroad. The town’s name comes from the Seminole word for “bird”. The town was a citrus town with tangerine and orange groves.
Current Status: The town had a stable growing population and by 1921 the town got a public school. The town vanished when the rail line was abandoned.
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Old Venus

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Palma Sola (Inhabited)

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Parmalee

County: Manatee
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Latitude / Longitude: 27° 22′ 16″ N, 82° 13′ 5″ W
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Comments: Parmalee, Florida was a community in Manatee County, Florida, United States.
Remains: Parmalee was a Florida turpentine town founded in the 1920s. The town had a post office, store and a sawmill before it went abandoned after the stable supply of turpentine ran out.
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Parramore

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Pembroke (Industrial)

County: Polk
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Perky

County: Monroe
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Latitude / Longitude: 25°44′49″N 80°56′24″W / 25.747°N 80.94°W / 25.747
Elevation: 0 ft (0 m)
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Comments: Perky is a ghost town in Monroe County, Florida, United States. It is located in the lower Florida Keys on Lower Sugarloaf Key near mile marker 17 on US 1 (the Overseas Highway).
Remains: A post office called Perky was established in 1929, and remained in operation until 1942. The town was named for its founder, R. C. Perky.
Current Status: It is the site of the historic Sugarloaf Key Bat Tower built by Richter Clyde Perky in 1929. The tower remains, and the original fishcamp is now a restaurant and lodge.
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Peru

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Peters

County: Miami-Dade
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Latitude / Longitude: 25°36′N 80°21′W / 25.600°N 80.350°W / 25.600
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Comments: Peters, Florida was a community in southern Dade County during the first half of the 20th century. It was located at the intersection of Quail Roost Road and the Florida East Coast Railway, and later became part of Perrine.
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Picnic

County: Hillsborough
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Latitude / Longitude: 27°45′45″N 82°08′44″W / 27.76250°N 82.14556°W / 27.76250 -82.14556
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Comments: Picnic, also known as Hurrah, is an unincorporated community in southeastern Hillsborough County, Florida, United States, between Plant City and Lithia near the intersection of Carter Road and Florida State Road 39. It is best known as the home of Alafia River State Park.
Remains: Picnic and Hurrah started as separate communities, shortly after the civil war. It draws its name from a popular gathering place at the junction of the Alafia River and Hurrah Creek.
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Picture City (Inhabited)

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Pierce

County: St. Lucie
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Latitude / Longitude: 27°26’20″N 80°20’8″W
Elevation: 16 ft (5 m)
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Comments: Fort Pierce is a city in and the county seat of St. Lucie County, Florida, United States. It is also known as the Sunrise City, sister to San Francisco, California, the Sunset City. The population was 41,590 at the 2010 census. As of 2012, the population recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau was 42,645. It is named after the army installation of Fort Pierce built in the area in 1838 during the Second Seminole War.
Remains: Fort Pierce was awarded the 2005 City of Excellence Award by the Florida League of Cities for overall excellence in city government and in 2011, Main Street Fort Pierce, Inc. received the Great American Main Street Award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation in downtown.
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Pigeon Key

County: Monroe
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Latitude / Longitude: 24°42′14″N 81°09′19″W / 24.7040°N 81.1553°W / 24.7040
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Comments: Pigeon Key is a historic district located on the small island of Pigeon Key in the lower Florida Keys, United States. The island is named “Cayo Paloma” on many old Spanish charts. It is located off the old Seven Mile Bridge, at approximately mile marker 45, west of Knight’s Key, (city of Marathon in the middle Florida Keys) and just east of Moser Channel, which is the deepest section of the seven-mile span.
Remains: Said to be named for large flocks of white-crowned pigeons (Columba leucocephala Linnaeus) which once roosted there. During the building of Henry Flagler’s Overseas Railroad Key West Extension, a major construction depot was located there, the jumping off point for construction of the Seven Mile Bridge. A number of buildings from the Flagler era remain on the island. They are now part of the Pigeon Key Historic District.
Current Status: A rare three-way bridge, now partially abandoned, is located there.
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Pinecrest (Inhabited)

County: Monroe
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Latitude / Longitude: 25°44′49″N 80°56′24″W / 25.747°N 80.94°W / 25.747
Elevation: 7 ft (2.1 m)
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Pine Level

County: DeSoto
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Latitude / Longitude: 27° 16′ 0″ N, 82° 0′ 0″ W
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Comments: Pine Level is a ghost town in DeSoto County, Florida, United States.
Remains: Pine Level was founded in the 1850s and had bars, saloons, courthouse, jail, stores, churches and homes. Gunfights were considered a common sight on the streets here. In 1866, the site of what became Pine Level was chosen as the new county seat of Manatee County to replace the Manatee River village of Manatee (now the eastern section of Bradenton). Ostensibly Pine Level was chosen for its more central geographic location, but it may have been chosen to punish Manatee for its Confederate sympathies in the Civil War.
Current Status: Today, all that remains of Pine Level is the Pine Level Methodist Church, the Indian Mound Cemetery, and the Pine Level Campground Cemetery. The site is marked by a State of Florida bronze marker.
Remarks: The East and West Coast Railway began construction of a route from Bradenton east to Arcadia in July 1913. The nearly 50 mile long line was completed and opened for operation on May 3, 1915. Pine Level was located on this line, 41 miles from it starting point in Bradenton. Pine Level had a depot, a 1,348′ railroad siding and a 524′ spur track. The railroad served a large saw mill at Pine Level. In July 1933, the Interstate Commerce Commission authorized the East & West Coast Railway to abandon the tracks from Bradenton to Arcadia. Most of the abandonment actually then took place in September 1934.

Pittman

County: Lake
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Latitude / Longitude: 29°0′N 81°39′W / 29.000°N 81.650°W / 29.000
Elevation: 69 ft (21 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
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Comments: Pittman is a census-designated place (CDP) in Lake County, Florida, United States.
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Current Status: The population was 192 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Orlando–Kissimmee Metropolitan Statistical Area.
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Pittsburg

County: Polk
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Latitude / Longitude: 27° 39′ 14″ N, 81° 30′ 9″ W
Elevation: 105 ft (32 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
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Comments: Pittsburg is a town in southern Polk County, Florida, United States at Latitude 27.65361 and Longitude: -81.50278, named for the industrial heritage of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Its elevation is 105 feet (32 m). It was mostly known for phosphate mining and a heavy industry rail spur (since abandoned), used mainly for transporting phosphates and cattle. It is approximately five miles (8 km) north of Avon Park, Florida.
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Popash

County: Hardee
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Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established: 1850s
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Comments: Popash, Florida is a small rural settlement in Hardee County, Florida, United States. It is located on State Road 64. Popash was founded in the 1850s, and was well-established by the late 1870s. It was possibly named after the pop ash tree. Railroad construction created a possibility of town growth, but the railroad ended up not being routed through the town. Popash has no official written history, it also has no historical placemarkers. In contemporary times, residents work as farmers, ranch workers and at orange groves around the town.
Remains: Popash was a town and agricultural community that was founded in the 1850s, and was a well-established community by “the late 1870s”. In 1879 a post office and The New Hope Baptist Church were organized and established in the community. The post office existed from 1879 to 1887, at which time it was relocated to Zolfo Springs. The church is one of the oldest ones in Hardee County. The town’s cemetery, named The New Hope Cemetery, was founded in the late 1870s and is located across from the church. The town’s name is possibly named after the pop ash tree.
Current Status: The town’s first school was established circa 1898, at which time Popash was located in DeSoto County. Many of the town’s activities and events were based at the school and the church. The school closed in 1948, and after several changes of ownership, was demolished in 2009. In 1951, the school was sold to the Board of County Commissioners for $100.00, after which time it was sold to various people throughout the 1950s. When they sold it, just two weeks after its purchase, the Board of County Commissioners retained a small section of 100 square feet to be used as a voting precinct for the general area “for years”. Attempts were made to have the school listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places, but the building was deemed as lacking in historical significance by Florida state officials. A general store was constructed in 1943, and was still in place as of 1987. Popash has no official written history, and the town lacks historical placemarkers.
Remarks: The building of the railroad in 1886 raised the possibility that it might come to the town, but instead it was routed through Zolfo Springs. This dashed hopes of the town experiencing growth, and the town remained relatively small and “sleepy”.

Port Leon

County: Wakulla
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Latitude / Longitude: 30° 7′ 52″ N, 84° 11′ 42″ W
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Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
Established: 1837
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Comments: Port Leon, Florida was a river port town located in what is now Wakulla County, Florida, which existed for only about six years in the first half of the 19th century. Port Leon is classified as an “extinct city” by the State Library and Archives of Florida and only remnants can be found today.
Remains: Port Leon, established in 1837, in large measure by former inhabitants of Magnolia, was located about 3 miles (4.8 km) south of St. Marks on the east bank of the St. Marks River. It, like neighboring St. Marks and Magnolia, was an important port for the cotton plantations of the Red Hills Region of Florida and Georgia.
Current Status: Port Leon had several hundred citizens at its peak with 8 to 10 businesses, some wharves, warehouses, a hotel, two taverns, a newspaper and an annual fair. One of the successful citizens was Daniel Ladd who had married into the Hamlin family from Maine that established the town of Magnolia.
Remarks: Port Leon received a post office in 1840, and was incorporated in 1841. In the same year Port Leon, along with the other communities in the area, endured a severe yellow fever epidemic. On March 11, 1843, it was chosen as the seat of newly created Wakulla County. On September 13, 1843, a strong hurricane with a 10-foot (3 m) storm surge hit the area and destroyed Port Leon as well as heavily damaging nearby Magnolia and St. Marks. Port Leon was abandoned and many of its residents moved inland to the new town of Newport.

Port Tampa (Inhabited)

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Prairie Ridge

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Providence

County: Union
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Punta Rassa

County: Lee
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 26°31′N 82°0′W / 26.517°N 82.000°W / 26.517
Elevation: 3 ft (1 m)
Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
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Comments: Punta Rassa is a census-designated place (CDP) in Lee County, Florida, United States. It is part of the Cape Coral–Fort Myers Metropolitan Statistical Area. The location was named “Punta Rasca” (Spanish for “smooth or flat point” and later corrupted to “Punta Rassa”) by the Spanish Conquistadors in the mid-16th century, who unloaded cattle in the area.
Remains: Punta Rassa was a thriving cattle shipping town in the 1800s. Florida cattle would be loaded at the port onto ships destined for Cuba. It was one of the home bases for the “King of the Cracker Cowboys” Jake Summerlin, who by the time he was 40 was one of the wealthiest of the Florida cattle barons. The town of Punta Rassa was lined with wooden buildings, including a hotel and several bars, which were frequented by the many merchants and cattle sellers.
Current Status: The population was 1,750 at the 2010 census.
Remarks: A railroad line was built towards Punta Rassa in the early 1920s by the Seaboard Air Line Railroad as part of an effort by Seaboard president S. Davies Warfield to reestablish a deepwater port at Punta Rassa. The 8-mile line branched off the Seaboard’s main line, which ran along the west bank of the Ten Mile Canal, in South Fort Myers near where Six Mile Cypress Parkway crosses the canal. It ran through where Lakes Park currently sits, and then roughly paralleled what is now Summerlin Road, terminating just east of Punta Rassa at Truckland. Due to their financial state, the Seaboard Air Line Railroad discontinued all operations in the Fort Myers area in 1952. Despite never fully reaching Punta Rassa, the abandoned line is still referred to as Seaboard’s Punta Rassa Branch. An FPL transmission line currently sits on a portion of the Punta Rassa Branch’s former right of way just south of Summerlin Road.

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