Ghost Towns of Wyoming

Ghost Towns Of Wyoming, United States Ghost Towns

Alva, WY

County: Crook
Zip Code: 82711
Latitude / Longitude: 44° 41′ 40.94 N, 104° 26′ 28.83 W
Elevation: 3,993 feet (1,217 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Alva is an unincorporated community in north-central Crook County, Wyoming, United States.
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Current Status: Although Alva is unincorporated, it has a post office, with the ZIP code of 82711. Population is 50. Public education in the community of Alva is provided by Crook County School District #1.
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Atlantic City, WY

County: Fremont
Zip Code: 82520
Latitude / Longitude: 42°29′43″N 108°43′8″W / 42.49528°N 108.71889°W / 42.49528
Elevation: 7,694 ft (2,345 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Atlantic City is a census-designated place (CDP) in Fremont County, Wyoming, United States. The population was 37 at the 2010 census. The community is a small mining settlement in a gulch near South Pass in southwestern Wyoming.
Remains: It was founded as a mining camp following the 1867 gold rush in the region. The town declined following the end of the placer gold rush in the early 1870s, but continued to exist as advances in mining technology allowed further extraction of gold. From the 1960s until 1983, it was the location of US Steel iron ore mine. The town is accessible by gravel roads from nearby Wyoming Highway 28.
Current Status: The town today has rustic flavor, with a small cluster of residences and the preserved Atlantic City Mercantile store and restaurant along the main road through town. It attracts a small number of tourists in the summer as well.
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Baker Town, WY

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Barrett Town, WY

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Bear Rock, WY

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Benton, WY

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Bessemer, WY

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Bosler, WY

County: Albany
Zip Code: 82051
Latitude / Longitude: 41°34′34″N 105°41′43″W / 41.57611°N 105.69528°W / 41.57611
Elevation: 7,080 ft (2,160 m)
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Comments: Bosler is an unincorporated community in central Albany County, Wyoming, United States, along the Laramie River. It lies along the concurrent U.S. Routes 30 and 287 north of the city of Laramie, the county seat of Albany County. Its elevation is 7,080 feet (2,158 m). Although Bosler is unincorporated, it has a post office, with the ZIP code of 82051.
Remains: In the Jalan Crossland song, “Bosler,” Crossland describes his idyllic dreams of life in Bosler, WY, presumably while living in a distant city. Among other things, Crossland describes the simple pleasures of watching children play in the streets and living in the simple trailer-life.
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Remarks: Public education in the community of Bosler is provided by Albany County School District #1.

Bryan, WY

County: Sweetwater
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Latitude / Longitude: 41° 34′ 14.06 N, 109° 40′ 53.21 W
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Comments: Bryan is a ghost town in Sweetwater County in the U.S. state of Wyoming. Bryan is located about 12 miles (19 km) west of Green River along the Blacks Fork River, and for a short time was the local headquarters and division point of the Union Pacific Railroad.
Remains: As with other cities in Wyoming, squatters rushed to occupy land in Green River City, in anticipation of the arrival of the transcontinental railroad, in 1868. Unwilling to negotiate with the squatters, the railroad instead laid out a new town to the west of Green River, along the Blacks Fork River, and established it as the local headquarters of the railroad. Stage service was established between Bryan and Green River and from there connecting to mines and towns throughout Wyoming.
Current Status: Today, only a few concrete foundations remain.
Remarks: Once passed over for the headquarters, the population in Green River dropped rapidly. Several years later, Blacks Fork dried up due to a drought and the railroad was concerned that there was not enough water in Bryan to service the locomotives. The railroad was able to acquire enough land to move the headquarters to Green River and completely abandoned Bryan. Green River thrived, but Bryan’s population plummeted and never recovered.

Buckhorn, WY

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Cambria, WY

County: Weston
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Latitude / Longitude: 43°56′21″N 104°12′27″W / 43.9391458°N 104.2074409°W / 43.9391458
Elevation: 5,121 ft (1,561 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1889
Disestablished: 1928
Comments: Cambria (1889-1928) is a ghost town located in the Black Hills of Weston County, Wyoming, United States. It was a successful coal mining town for decades.
Remains: Cambria started out as a mining town. It is possible that the coal in the area was used by early Western settlers to heat their homes. After the American Civil War, demand for coal skyrocketed as railroads began westward expansion. The Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad stopped its westward expansion in Alliance, Nebraska, due to high eastern coal costs. Kilpatrick Brothers & Collins (KB&C) sent prospectors into the Black Hills to search for coal in the hopes of securing a railroad contract with the railroad. In 1887, high-grade anthracite deposits were discovered by Frank Mondell inside Coal Creek Canyon or Little Oil Creek Canyon, Wyoming. This area was renamed Cambria Canyon. The Cambria Fuel Company was founded by KB&C with Frank Mondell as its manager. The Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad signed the contract and laid tracks north from Newcastle, Wyoming to the new mine, which were completed in 1889.
Current Status: The Cambria Casino Park is now a resort sometimes leased to the Flying V Ranch, and still operates as a bed and breakfast known as the Flying V Cambria Inn. Several houses are still standing on the site today. The home of the superintendent, the church steeple, the mule stables, the bank and office vaults, a few garages, many mine buildings, and cold cellars are also among the ruins. The 365 steps leading up to where the school and residential area once stood are still intact. Clearings through the trees mark where the paths and roads were. Cambria was located 8 miles (13 km) north of Newcastle, Wyoming, just off of U.S. Highway 85.
Remarks: The first Catholic church service in Cambria was held in 1891 and was led by Reverend P. Cassidy, a resident of Hot Springs, South Dakota. The church services were attended by members of several different denominations. The St. James Roman Catholic Church was constructed by Reverend P. J. Lynch in 1903, under a 99-year lease from the company that cost $2,000. Cambria was also home to an Episcopal church, which was once visited by Ethelbert Talbot.

Canyon Springs, WY

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Carbon Timber Town, WY

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Clifton, WY

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Forest City, WY

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Fort Steele, WY

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Grand Encampment, WY

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Hecla, WY

County: Laramie
Zip Code: 82009
Latitude / Longitude: 41°9’27N 105°10’24W
Elevation: 6,758 ft (2,060 m)
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Comments: Hecla is a ghost town in Laramie County in the U.S. state of Wyoming.
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Horton, WY

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Jay Em, WY

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Jeffrey City, WY

County: Fremont
Zip Code: 82310
Latitude / Longitude: 42°29′26″N 107°49′42″W / 42.49056°N 107.82833°W / 42.49056
Elevation: 6,335 ft (1,931 m)
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Comments: Jeffrey City is a census-designated place (CDP) and former uranium mining boomtown located in Fremont County, in the central part of the U.S. state of Wyoming. The town is famous in Wyoming and the American West as symbol of a boomtown that went “bust” very quickly, as the mine was shut down in 1982 and over 95% of the inhabitants left the town within 3 years. The population was 58 at the 2010 census, far lower than its onetime population of several thousand people.
Remains: Jeffrey City began in 1931 as “Home on the Range”, the 640-acre (2.6 km2) homestead of a Nebraska couple named the Petersons, who relocated because Mr. Peterson was sick after having been gassed in World War I. Mrs. Beulah Peterson (later Walker) opened two gas pumps when the highway came through, and began cooking for those who stopped. The post office at Split Rock, 14 miles (23 km) away, closed in 1943, and Mrs. Peterson took up the task of handling the ranchers’ mail. She canceled the letters with “Home on the Range”. She retired her post office cancellation stamp in 1957 when Home on the Range became Jeffrey City. Her family members are currently restoring the old Home on the Range post office site.
Current Status: Today, few institutions remain: the First (Southern) Baptist Church (which is still doing well thanks to the area ranchers who attend), a restaurant and bar called the Split Rock Café that caters to the few local residents and those passing through on the highway, and Monkingbird Pottery, a pottery studio. The Green Mountain Motel provides perhaps the only lodging along the 122-mile (196 km) route between Rawlins and Riverton.
Remarks: Home on the Range became Jeffrey City when those who came to mine uranium sought to honor Dr. C. W. Jeffrey, a wealthy doctor from Rawlins, Wyoming, who initially financed the costs for prospector and businessman Bob Adams to start the Western Nuclear Corporation mining firm and open a uranium mine near the area in 1957, during the Cold War and the height of uranium demand.

Jireh, WY

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Kane, WY

County: Big Horn
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Latitude / Longitude: 44°50′37″N 108°12′10″W / 44.84361°N 108.20278°W / 44.84361
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Comments: Kane is a ghost town that existed 2 miles (3.2 km) south of the confluence of the Shoshone River and the Bighorn River in Big Horn County, northern Wyoming.
Remains: Prior to the completion of the Yellowtail Dam in Montana, the residents of Kane sold their homes and land to the federal government. When the dam was completed the area surrounding Kane was flooded by the Bighorn Lake reservoir.
Current Status: Kane Cemetery 44°53’03N 108°12’34W still exists in its original location, 1 mile (1.6 km) north of the rivers’ confluence, and now within the Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, . Relatives of people buried in the cemetery may continue to be buried there. An idea, untrue, gained currency that the cemetery and its residents were relocated prior to the impoundment of water in the reservoir behind the dam.
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Kirwin, WY

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Lewiston, WY

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Lost Springs, WY

County: Converse
Zip Code: 82224
Latitude / Longitude: 42°45′57″N 104°55′37″W / 42.76583°N 104.92694°W / 42.76583
Elevation: 4,997 ft (1,523 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
Established: Lost Springs is a town in Converse County, Wyoming, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 4. By 1960, the population of the town had dropped to five. In 1976, both the state of Wyoming and the U.S. Bicentennial Commission designated Lost Springs as the smallest incorporated town in America; its population was then eleven.
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Remains: Lost Springs was first inhabited in the 1880s, when it received its name from railroad workers who could not find the springs shown on survey maps of the area. The town was incorporated in 1911, and it originally had 200 residents, most of whom worked at the nearby Rosin coal mine. After the coal mine closed around 1930, the population of Lost Springs steadily declined.
Current Status: In 1983, Lost Springs became involved in a court battle with the Chicago and North Western Transportation Company. The railroad, which ran adjacent to the town, attempted to seize 5.2 acres (2.1 ha) of land to build a 22-foot (6.7 m) railway embankment. Lost Springs Mayor Leda Price alleged that the embankment, which would lie between the town and U.S. Highways 18 and 20, would separate the town from traffic on the highway. A Wyoming district judge ruled in the town’s favor, and the railroad ultimately agreed to build an unobstructing track bed and use its own land for track.
Remarks: Lost Springs is located on the High Plains. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.09 square miles (0.23 km2), all of it land.

Manhattan, WY

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Mineral Hill, WY

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Miner’s Delight, WY

County: Fremont
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Latitude / Longitude: 42°31′58″N 108°40′48″W / 42.53278°N 108.68000°W / 42.53278
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Comments: Hamilton City, or Miner’s Delight as it was commonly known, was a town in Fremont County, Wyoming, United States, on the southeastern tip of the Wind River Range, that prospered during the mining boom in the American West in the second half of the 19th century. It was a “sister city” of Atlantic City and South Pass City.
Remains: Today, through historic preservation by the Bureau of Land Management and various university programs and courses, the ghost town at Miner’s Delight stands as a testament to the passage of time, and provides historians with a peek at early Wyoming life and the gold mining culture. On the townsite are seventeen structures, including: seven cabins, one saloon, one meat house, one shop or barn, one shaft house, one pantry, one cellar, three privies, and a corral. All of the buildings are constructed of logs or unfinished lumber.
Current Status: Today a few buildings still stand as a reminder of an era in Wyoming’s past history. Miner’s Delight was added to the National Register of Historic Places on June 4, 1980. The road west out of Miner’s Delight intersects with WYO 28 four miles west of town; Wyo. 28 intersects with US 287 thirty miles north of that intersection.
Remarks: The town’s nomenclature, and how it ended up being called “Miner’s Delight” instead of “Hamilton City”, is a topic of historical debate. There are generally two stories associated with the changing of the town’s name. Both stories involve the discovery of a golden lode, a miner’s delight, on the ridge above town. The first story holds that in 1869, a man named William Jones, while chasing his cows about a pasture, stumbled across some quartz with gold flecks dotting it. The site was so remote and so far above town, that he erroneously assumed no one else would ever find it. Contented, he continued on his way, gathering his stray cattle. When he returned later to the site of the gold lode, however, he found others working the claim. He tried to relate his tale of the discovery to the other miners, but they would have none of it, and ran him off. The other story does not have quite the same Old West flair as the tale of Jones’ would-be discovery. A man named Johnathan Pugh, who incidentally is listed as one of the original founders of the lode, claimed to have discovered the gold. He even described the quartz ridge above town, down to the gold nuggets embedded in it.

Moskee, WY

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Pacific Springs, WY

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Piedmont, WY

County: Uinta
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Latitude / Longitude: 41°13′4″N 110°37′40″W / 41.21778°N 110.62778°W / 41.21778
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Comments: Piedmont is a ghost town located in Uinta County, Wyoming. It was once a thriving small railroad and timber town, but started to decline when Union Pacific opened a new line that bypassed the town. Piedmont is located at 41°13’4.04″ North, 110°37’40.02″ West (41.21779, -110.62778). Many sources will provide other coordinates for this town, but they usually point to Ft. Bridger, Wyoming, which is the nearest city.
Remains: Piedmont, located southeast of Evanston, was settled about 1867 to provide railroad ties for the Union Pacific Railroad. Moses Byrne built several kilns here for producing charcoal, and Charles Guild established one of the first ranches in the Territory. Both Byrne and Guild were Mormon pioneers. Originally, the area was named “Byrne,” but due to confusion with Bryan Station was renamed Piedmont. Both Byrne’s wives, Anne Beus and Catherine Cardon, and Guild’s wife, Marie Madeleine Cardon, were from small towns in the Torino Province, part of the Piedmont Region of northern Italy. Moses’ wife Anne Beus lived in Ogden, Utah, and his other wife Catherine Cardon eventually ended up living in Piedmont, after first having spent time in the Utah towns of Ogden and Slaterville. Most historical sources that reference both ‘Mrs. Byrne’ and Piedmont are taken to be referring to Catherine Cardon. Catherine Cardon Byrne and Marie Madelaine Cardon Guild were sisters.
Current Status: In 1940, lack of business forced the closing of the old Guild Mercantile Store. Since then, most of the buildings have been hauled away. All that remains are three or four tumbledown remnants of homes, some foundations, the coal dump where the engine shed once stood, the charcoal kilns of Moses Byrne, and the cemeteries.
Remarks: Piedmont, a typical tent camp for the railroad, probably at this time knew its greatest population; yet there is evidence of only approximately twenty homes. The tent town served as a base camp for the graders who were constructing a roadbed up the steep side of the mountain to the summit called Aspen Station. About 1910, the Union Pacific Railroad began digging the Aspen tunnel through Aspen mountain. The completion of the tunnel—approximately one and one-half miles long—resulted in the elimination of the steep, winding grade from Piedmont to Aspen Station. The railroad was rerouted from LeRoy to the tunnel, missing Piedmont by several miles. Piedmont was stranded, and its demise began.

Rocky Ford, WY

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Sherman, WY

County: Albany
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Latitude / Longitude: 41°07′52″N 105°23′53″W / 41.13111°N 105.39806°W / 41.13111
Elevation: 8,035 ft (2,449 m)
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Comments: Sherman is a ghost town in Albany County, Wyoming, United States. Sherman is 19 miles (31 km) southeast of Laramie in the Laramie Mountains. It is named for William Tecumseh Sherman. The town was located at the summit of the original grade of the First Transcontinental Railroad. Although the railroad has been regraded and relocated through this portion of Wyoming, the name Sherman, or Sherman Summit or Sherman Hill Summit has been applied to the nearby summits of the modern transportation arteries in the Laramie Mountains.
Remains: The town of Sherman was named for William Tecumseh Sherman, purportedly at his own request. It was located about 7.5 miles (12.1 km) south-southeast of the modern Sherman Summit and was the highest point on the original alignment of the First Transcontinental Railroad of the Union Pacific Railroad, at an elevation of 8,247 ft (2,514 m). Prior to being named Sherman, Union Pacific construction crews had called the area Lone Tree Pass and Evans Pass. The original name honored James Evans, who surveyed the area searching for a shorter route through Wyoming than the earlier trails which crossed at South Pass.
Current Status: Because the tracks were later relocated a few miles south, the original town of Sherman no longer exists, but this is still the location of the Ames Monument, erected by the railroad to mark its original high point.
Remarks: As a result of the track relocation, the high point on the railroad, today known as the Overland Route, is now about 3.4 miles (5.5 km) southeast of the Ames Monument at 41°05’52N 105°21’03W, at an elevation of 8,014 ft (2,443 m). There is no town here, but the official railroad name for this location is, perhaps not surprisingly, Sherman. However, this point (like the Ames Monument) is not actually on the crest of the Laramie Mountains, which is now surmounted via the nearby Hermosa Tunnel at the slightly lower elevation of 7,960 ft (2,430 m).

South Pass City, WY

County: Fremont
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Latitude / Longitude: 42°28′06″N 108°47′59″W / 42.46833°N 108.79972°W / 42.46833
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Comments: South Pass City is an unincorporated community in Fremont County, Wyoming, United States. It is located 2 miles (3 km) south of the intersection of highways 28 and 131. A former station on the Oregon Trail, it became a ghost town after later gold mines were closed. The entire community is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The closest town is Atlantic City, Wyoming. Some people have moved back in.
Remains: South Pass City developed rapidly as a stage and telegraph station on the Oregon Trail during the 1850s. The site of the first settlement in the area was about 9 miles (14 km) south of present-day South Pass City, at what is today known as Burnt Ranch. Burnt Ranch was located where the Emigrant Trails crossed the Sweetwater River for the last time and ascended toward the South Pass.
Current Status: By the end of the 20th century, steps were being taken to renew the community, and to develop it as an historic site for destination tourism. The community in the early 21st century consists of two areas: South Pass City, in which a handful of residents live, and South Pass City State Historic Site, which preserves more than 30 historic structures dating from the city’s heyday in the 1860s and 1870s. In 1970, the community was added to the National Register of Historic Places. The town has been extensively documented by the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) in drawings and in photographs, by HABS photographer Jack Boucher. The road west out of South Pass City intersects with WYO 28 two miles (3 km) west of town; Wyo. 28 intersects with US 287 thirty-five miles north of that intersection.
Remarks: In 1866, gold was discovered in the vicinity, and a year later prospecting began on what would become the Carissa mine. Prospectors and adventurers quickly arrived and founded South Pass City. Within a year, the community’s population had swelled to about 2,000. One of those who arrived in 1869, was Esther Hobart Morris. In 1870 she became the first woman in the United States to serve as a Justice of the Peace. At her urging in 1869, William H. Bright, a saloon owner and representative to the Wyoming Territorial Constitutional Convention, introduced a women’s suffrage clause into the territorial constitution. When the constitution was approved by Territorial Governor John A. Campbell in December 1869, Wyoming became the first jurisdiction in the United States to grant women the right to vote, a right which was not granted women nationally until 1920.

Spencer, WY

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Sunrise, WY

County: Platte
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Latitude / Longitude: 42°19′55″N 104°42′11″W / 42.33194°N 104.70306°W / 42.33194
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Comments: Sunrise was a company mining town of the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company located in Platte County, Wyoming. The entire site of the former mining district and town is on the National Register of Historic Places.
Remains: In the 1880s the area around what would become Sunrise was an important area in the mining of copper. In 1890, Charles A. Guernsey, after whom the nearby town of Guernsey, Wyoming is named, founded the Wyoming Railway and Iron Company to exploit iron mining in the area. In 1898, the Colorado Fuel and Iron company began leasing mining rights in the area to improve its supply of iron. In 1904 Colorado Fuel and Iron bought the entire Sunrise Mine. Colorado Fuel and Iron hoped to make Sunrise a model company town. In the early 1900s company-owned houses, boarding houses, depots, a school, churches, shops, and other structures were built. In response to the Ludlow Massacre, further improvements came to the town in the 1910s and 1920s in the form of better brick housing, a YMCA building, parks, a playground, better utility systems, a hospital, and other improvements. By 1928 the mine employed 547.
Current Status: Initially, the mining methods used at Sunrise were strip mining followed by glory-hole mining. In 1930, underground block caving mining was started, and by World War II all mining was underground. Ore mined was partially processed on site and then sent to Colorado Fuel and Iron mills in Pueblo, Colorado.
Remarks: Because of decreasing ore quality and problems in the domestic steel market, the town and mine were closed by Colorado Fuel and Iron in 1980. Over the lifetime of the mine 40 million tons of iron ore were produced, more than any other C.F. & I. mine. The district was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. Place of Supernatural Season 6 episode ‘Frontierland’, with Samuel Colt. The boys, Sam and Dean, travel back in time to kill a phoenix and collect its ashes.

Superior, WY

County: Sweetwater
Zip Code: 82945
Latitude / Longitude: 41°45′47″N 108°58′3″W / 41.76306°N 108.96750°W / 41.76306
Elevation: 7,070 ft (2,155 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Superior is a town in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, United States.
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Current Status: The population was 336 at the 2010 census.
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Table Rock, WY

County: Sweetwater
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Latitude / Longitude: 41°37′34″N 108°23′17″W / 41.62611°N 108.38806°W / 41.62611
Elevation: 6,824 ft (2,080 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Table Rock is a ghost town in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, United States. It was a census-designated place at the 2000 census, with a population of 82, but by the 2010 census the population had dropped to 0. Table Rock lies along Interstate 80 in the Red Desert Basin, between Rock Springs and Wamsutter. According to the United States Census Bureau, Table Rock has a total area of 6.8 square miles (17.6 km²), all of it land.
Remains: Table Rock was built in the late 1970s by Colorado Interstate Gas (CIG) as a company town, to house workers during an area boom and housing shortage. It was built just north of the company’s natural gas processing plant. CIG provided employees three- or four-bedroom homes free of charge and built a community center. The village began to decline after El Paso Corp. acquired CIG in 2001. In 2003, the plant and town were bought by Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, which then decided not to operate the village. Table Rock was closed in July 2003. The housing units were sold to real estate developers, and some of them moved to Rock Springs.
Current Status: The remaining homes were demolished in late August, 2011, leaving the community center as the only structure standing on the village site, and it was scheduled to be moved
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The Duncan, WY

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Tubb Town, WY

County: Weston
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Latitude / Longitude: 43°49′17″N 104°08′27″W / 43.82139°N 104.14083°W / 43.82139 -104.14083
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Time Zone: Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
Established: spring 1889
Disestablished: November 1, 1889
Comments: Tubb Town, also known as Field City, Tibville, or simply Tubbtown, is a ghost town in Weston County, Wyoming, United States.
Remains: In the late 1880s, the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad made its way through Wyoming, inspiring the Cambria Fuel Company miners to found Newcastle, Wyoming along the railroad. In the spring of 1889, Tubb Town was built by DeLoss Dewitt Tubbs, a resident of Custer, South Dakota, further down the expected site of the railroad; at first, it was only a store. Around that time, F. R. Curran set up an open-air bar, and by the time he built his house over it, the town was beginning to boom. The bar was used by workers from the Burlington & Missouri River Railroad. Later, oil drilling went on in the area. The residents of Whoop-Up, Wyoming, a nearby railhead town, moved to Tubb Town, expecting it to become a large city. Tubb Town soon gained a reputation for being a very rough place to live; the initiation was to buy drinks for everyone at the saloons. Calamity Jane also visited the town once.
Current Status: Tubb Town was located along Salt Creek and the Custer-Belle Fourche Trail, two miles northeast of Newcastle, in Weston County, Wyoming. It is around where U.S. Highway 85 intersects U.S. Highway 16. It is 7.9 miles west of the South Dakota border. There are no remaining buildings. The site is now marked by a memorial commemorating the town’s boom and bust.
Remarks: However, on September 1, 1889, the railroad announced that it would not pass through Tubb Town. Tubbs did not realize that the Lincoln Land Company, a subsidiary of the railroad, had already plotted the towns to be built along the railroad. On September 10, 1889, the first lots in Newcastle were sold, and the exodus from Tubb Town to Newcastle began. One saloon owner set up shop in the back of his wagon and operated for the town’s residents while on the move. The town was officially abandoned by November 1, 1889. Today, the former site is empty.

Van Tassell, WY

County: Niobrara
Zip Code: 82242
Latitude / Longitude: 42°39′49″N 104°5′28″W / 42.66361°N 104.09111°W / 42.66361
Elevation: 4,741 ft (1,445 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
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Comments: Van Tassell is a town in Niobrara County, Wyoming, United States. The population was 15 at the 2010 census. It is the least populous town in the least populous county of the least populous state in the U.S.
Remains: A post office was established at Van Tassell in 1910. The town was named for R. S. Van Tassell, a cattleman.
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Walcott, WY

County: Carbon
Zip Code: 82335
Latitude / Longitude: 41°45′40″N 106°50′42″W / 41.76111°N 106.84500°W / 41.76111
Elevation: 6,627 ft (2,020 m)
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Comments: Walcott is an unincorporated community in central Carbon County, Wyoming, United States. It lies along local roads near Interstate 80 and the concurrent U.S. Routes 30 and 287, east of the city of Rawlins, the county seat of Carbon County. Its elevation is 6,627 feet (2,020 m). Although Walcott is unincorporated, it had a post office, with the ZIP code of 82335 that closed in 2007. Public education in the community of Walcott is provided by Carbon County School District #2.
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Welcome, WY

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Whoop-Up, WY

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How Many Ghost Towns Are In Wyoming?