Ghost Towns of South Dakota (Q-Z)

Ghost Towns Of South Dakota, United States Ghost Towns

Quartz City

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Due to the inaccuracy of the maps drawn of the area, its exact location is unknown.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Queen Bee

County: Pennington
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: A large fire destroyed all remains of the town in the 1930s.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Ragged Top

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 44°21′35″N 103°53′09″W / 44.35972°N 103.88583°W / 44.35972
Elevation: 5,873 ft (1,790 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Ragged Top (also Balmoral) is a ghost town in Lawrence County, South Dakota, United States. While the town was once a prosperous mining town, it declined due to miners’ inability to transport their ore to smelters.
Remains: Ragged Top was started as a gold mining town in the 1880s and was originally called Balmoral after a local mine. The name was later renamed for the hill, Ragged Top Mountain, on which it was located. Ragged Top also referred to the mining district which also encompassed the nearby towns (all now abandoned) of Preston, Cyanide, Dacy, and Balmoral. The population of the area was estimated to be around 300 to 400 in the early 1880s, but this estimate is most likely too low. Some of the mining companies in the area were the Dacy, Deadwood Standard, Eva H. & Silver Tongue, Eagle Bird, American Mining Company, Ulster, Old Ironsides, Victoria, Metallic Streak, and Spearfish Gold Mining and Milling Company. The last one produced 48,618 ounces (1,378,300 g) of gold between 1899 and 1906. The mines were not very well explored before 1896, and all had ceased operation by around 1915.
Current Status: The town itself was soon abandoned due to the extreme difficulty of transporting the ore to the smelters.
Remarks: Ragged Top was located in the Black Hills of central Lawrence County, South Dakota, on Ragged Top Mountain and above Spearfish Valley. It is south of Spearfish and west of Lead.

Reausaw

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Red Fern

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Redwater

County: Butte
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Existed around 1921
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Reed

County: Butte
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Richmond

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Only the schoolhouse remains
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Rockerville

County: Pennington
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 43° 57′ 29″ N, 103° 21′ 31″ W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Rockerville is a small unincorporated community in Pennington County in the Black Hills of the U.S. state of South Dakota. Originally established as a mining camp, it was named for the “rockers” which were used to separate placer gold from stream gravel. Rockerville was founded in 1876 as the result of a gold rush.
Remains: It was a tourist town in the 1950s and 1960s because of its key location on US Highway 16 between Rapid City and Mount Rushmore National Memorial. It had a variety of tourist attractions, including a “Mellerdrammer” (Mellodrama) live theatre, a “Ghosttown” of various buildings with tourist shops and small amusements, “It’s a Small World” Museum (featuring an 1880 Tiny Town model and other miniature collections), a motel, campgrounds and RV parks. However, in the conversion of US Highway 16 to four lanes in the mid-1960s, the original townsite was placed literally between the two separate roadways, as there was no way to widen the original highway through the town without completely destroying it. The construction of at least three exits into the town from both directions, the town continued to be a vibrant tourist attraction in the 1970s and 1980s. The tourist could take in daily wild west shows, shootouts, stagecoach rides, and gold panning. Fine dining was and still is available at the Gaslight Restaurant. Travelers could stay in town at the local Trading Post Motel, buy groceries, and gas up their cars at the Rockerville Trading Post.
Current Status: Today, several subdivisions and rural residential areas have been built around Rockerville, which also has a sawmill and other commercial activities, leaving the small town rather like a doughnut. It is located close enough to Rapid City, Hill City, and Keystone to serve as a bedroom community. A larger commercial area has grown up on US Highway 16 approximately 1 mile east, known as “East Rockerville” or “Rockerville Flats” with various tourist-oriented businesses and more residential areas.
Remarks: To the west, on the old alignment of US Highway 16, now called Silver Mountain Road, is the rural community of Silver Mountain, including Storm Mountain Center, a United Methodist camping facility. The Flume Trail, a hiking trail following the alignment and remains of a water flume built to provide water for those gold rockers in the 1880s, connects Rockerville, Storm Mountain, and Boulder Hills with Sheridan Lake, deeper in the Hills. Also, the west is Beretta Gulch, US Forest Service land well-known to locals as a popular shooting range, and the Keystone Wye, where US 16 and US 16A divide, and famous for what was once the world’s largest timber arch bridge.

Rosedale

County: Pennington
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Existed around 1935
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Rossville

County: Pennington
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Was in existence around 1883
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Runkel

County: Meade
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: The only real marker of the town is an apple orchard that still stands today. Also spelled Runkle.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Sacora

County: Meade
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Existed around 1891
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Safe Investment

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Sampont

County: Butte
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Saratoga

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Sheep’s Tail

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Sheridan

County: Pennington
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 43°58′37″N 103°28′14″W / 43.9769321°N 103.4704676°W / 43.9769321
Elevation: 4,626 ft (1,410 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Sheridan, originally called Golden City, was an early mining camp in Pennington County, South Dakota, United States. It was the first county seat of Pennington County from 1877 to 1878. It is now submerged under Sheridan Lake.
Remains: Sheridan began as a gold mining camp in the Black Hills, was laid out in the spring of 1875, and was originally called Golden City. It is the third oldest camp in the Black Hills. There were several mines in the area, including the Queen Bee, J.R., Blue Lead, and Calumet. One of the first rich placers was found there in 1875. That October, $3,000 worth of gold was taken out by placer miners. By February 1876, Golden City had several residents, four stores, and many houses. A stage line connecting Deadwood to Denver ran through the town, leading to more growth. In 1877, the town was renamed to Sheridan, in honor of U.S. Army General Philip Sheridan. It became the temporary county seat of Pennington County. The courthouse was built by the citizens in late 1877 and that October, held the first term of the U.S. Circuit Court west of the Missouri River.
Current Status: The circuit court later moved to Deadwood and the stage line changed course. In 1878, the county seat moved to Rapid City. In the mid-1880s, the town caught fire, and many buildings were destroyed. By 1920, there were only 10 residents in Sheridan, and the nearby mines were quickly failing. Eventually, Sheridan became a ghost town. In 1939, Spring Creek was dammed and Sheridan was submerged under the new Sheridan Lake. The only thing that remains of Sheridan is a one-story house that was moved six miles to the south just before the creek was dammed, on the edge of a small meadow. This house once belonged to Johnny and Kit Good and had 12 outside doors.
Remarks: Sheridan is located in the Black Hills of Pennington County, South Dakota, United States. It is 8 miles north of Hill City, along U.S. Route 85. It is about 20 feet below the surface of Sheridan Lake. Spring Creek empties into the north end of Sheridan Lake. The Good house is located on the right side of U.S. Route 85A (There is no Route 85A), 6 miles south of the lake and 1.5 miles north of Hill City.

Silver City

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: An early mining town on Bald Mountain. Not to be confused with the Silver City in Pennington County, which is still active.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Slabtown

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: The town only survived for two years. Its post office was later moved to Novak.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Snoma

County: Butte
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: The town was once home to the Snoma Finnish Cemetery, an NRHP-listed place. It was probably intended to be called Suomi or Suoma.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

South Bend

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: It had a population of 116 in 1880, but when it was abandoned, the residents moved to Central City.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Sparta City

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Its exact location is unknown.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Spokane

County: Custer
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 43°50′29″N 103°22′48″W / 43.8413775°N 103.3799128°W / 43.8413775
Elevation: 4,521 ft (1,378 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1890
Disestablished:
Comments: Spokane is a ghost town located in Custer County, South Dakota, United States. It was a mining camp in the Black Hills. Spokane was named after Spokane, Washington, via a local silver mine.
Remains: Spokane was originally intended to be a gold mining town, but the Spokane Mine also produced silver, lead, beryl, copper, mica, hematite, graphite, and zinc. Both the town and mine were founded in 1890. 1927 was one of the town’s best years, when the town’s profits totaled $144,742. The town turned this money into a school, and several new miners entered the area. The mine soon began to fail again, and it closed in 1940. By this decade, the town was already largely abandoned. In the 1950s, a few companies unsuccessfully tried to reopen the mine. The mine’s buildings eventually burned down, and others that were deemed unsafe were destroyed by the U.S. Forest Service.
Current Status: A watchman remained in the town until the mid-1980s, and after that, the town was officially abandoned. The remains of the town include the schoolhouse, a few old cars, a root cellar, and a few foundations.
Remarks: Spokane was located in the Black Hills in Custer County, South Dakota, United States. It is 16 miles east of Custer.

Spring-On-The-Hill

County: Custer
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Squaw Creek

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Its exact location is unknown.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Stamford

County: Jackson
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 43° 53′ 42″ N, 101° 5′ 21″ W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Stamford is an unincorporated community in Jackson County, in the U.S. state of South Dakota.
Remains: Stamford was laid out in 1906, and named after Stamford, Connecticut. A post office called Stamford was established in 1907, and remained in operation until 1966.
Current Status: Burned down 3 times before its closing.
Remarks:

String Town Logging Camp

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Summit

County: Custer
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Sylvan City

County: Custer
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Teddy Bear

County: Pennington
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 43°57’05″N 103°30’22″W
Elevation: 4,770 ft (1,450 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Teddy Bear is a ghost town in Pennington County, South Dakota. The settlement was located 3.5 mi (5.6 km) east of Hill City.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Teepee

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Tenderfoot

County: Custer
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Tepee

County: Pennington
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Terraville

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 44°21′44″N 103°45′53″W / 44.3622065°N 103.7646429°W / 44.3622065 -103.7646429
Elevation: 5,148 ft (1,569 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Terraville is a ghost town in Lawrence County, South Dakota, United States. It was founded in 1877 as a mining camp and later evolved into a town. It was purchased by the Homestake Mining Company and was destroyed in 1982 to make way for a new mine.
Remains: In the 1870s, four men–Moses and Fred Manuel, Hank Herney, and Alex Engh–entered the area on the hunt for gold. They each filed a claim in Bobtail Gulch on February 21, 1876. That spring, they discovered a rich lode, and on April 9, 1876, they located it under the name Homestake. The claim was later bought by men from California, who formed the Homestake Mining Company. Used as the first headquarters of the Homestake, Terraville was founded in 1877 and became a home for the miners–and their families–of the local mines, including the Caledonia, Terra, and Deadwood. A tunnel was built by the company to connect Terraville to Lead. This tunnel was used both to carry ore from the Homestake Mine to the smelters in Terraville and also as a path for residents to travel between the towns. In 1880, 775 people lived in the town, making it the fifth-largest town in the Black Hills at that time. During Terraville’s golden years, 220 stamp mills were in operation. The town grew to include several stores; bars; churches, the most notable and longest-surviving of which was the Terraville Methodist Church; a schoolhouse; a hospital; boarding houses; and several houses. 280 steps connected various parts of the town and the surrounding area and mines. Water rights were secured for the town by the company. In 1900, approximately 700 people used the town’s post office.
Current Status: The Homestake Mining Company later moved its headquarters and mining activities to Lead. By the 1970s, most of the residents of Terraville traveled to Lead for shopping and work. Terraville didn’t have a mayor or law enforcement, except for the county sheriff. In the summer of 1982, the post office closed, the town was destroyed, and the 723 residents were forced to move when the Homestake Mining Company decided to create an open-cut mine at Terraville. The Homestake called it the Terraville Test Pit Project. Every building, most of them at least 100 years old, was torn down; at 102 years old, the Terraville Methodist Church was the oldest operating church west of the Mississippi River at the time of its demolition and plans to make it a historical landmark had emerged. Today, only remnants of the roads remain. An annual reunion for the former residents of Terraville has been held every year since at least 2001 in Deadwood.
Remarks: Terraville is located in the Black Hills of Lawrence County, South Dakota. It was built on the peak of a mountain between Lead and Central City, just above the Homestake Mine. Deadwood Gulch and the ghost town of Lincoln are also nearby.

Terry

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 44° 20′ 1″ N, 103° 49′ 1″ W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Terry is an unincorporated community in Lawrence County, in the U.S. state of South Dakota.
Remains: A post office called Terry was established in 1892, and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1929. The community took its name from nearby Terry Peak.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Texana

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Texas Town

County: Union
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: All that remains is a cemetery. It is also called Texas.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Tigerville

County: Pennington
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 43°58′36″N 103°38′24″W / 43.9766509°N 103.6399165°W / 43.9766509
Elevation: 5,485 ft (1,672 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1878
Disestablished: 1885
Comments: Tigerville or Tiger City (1878–1885) is a ghost town in the Black Hills of Pennington County, South Dakota, United States. The old mining town represents the boom and bust fate of many Western towns. The town’s name might have come from the Bengal Tiger Mine, located 2–3 miles away. Others say that the name came from the unpatented Lucky Tiger claims Numbers 1, 2, and 3; though these do not show up on maps, locals say that the claims were nearby the town.
Remains: Tigerville was founded in 1878 in the King Solomon Mine area, which was known for its gold and quartz placer deposits. It had a post office, two stores, three saloons, blacksmith, school, and a stage barn, which was a stop on the Cheyenne-Custer-Deadwood line. The nearby Bengal Tiger Mine, despite reportedly having promising mineral deposits, was never successfully mined. In 1880, the town reached 200 residents and was able to send six delegates to the South Dakota Republican Convention; seeing as Rapid City, South Dakota had only ten at the time, this was a notable accomplishment for the town. The town eventually grew to about 500 citizens.
Current Status: When the town hit its bust, and the mines closed in 1885, many of the miners settled on nearby ranches or moved to other towns. In 1974, only one house and the sawmill remained.
Remarks: Tigerville is located in the Black Hills of western Pennington County, South Dakota, United States. The old townsite is located about 4.5 miles northwest of Hill City, South Dakota, at the junction of roads leading to Hill City, Deerfield Lake, and Rochford, South Dakota.

Tinton

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 44°22′50″N 104°02′55″W / 44.3805398°N 104.0485446°W / 44.3805398
Elevation: 5,961 ft (1,817 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1800s
Disestablished: 1950s
Comments: Tinton is a ghost town in the Black Hills of Lawrence County, South Dakota, United States. It started out as a gold mining camp and later began to produce tin.
Remains: The area was first settled in 1876 by Edgar St. John, who lived in the town until his death in 1928. That same year, tin was discovered in the area in placer deposits. In 1879, large gold deposits were found in Negro Hill, just south of the present-day townsite. This discovery caused the first boom of the area. In 1884, tin was discovered within pegmatite rock, furthering the development of the area and converting the operation from gold to tin. A mining company known as the Tinton Company had built Tinton by 1904. The town had a post office, bank, mill, two-room schoolhouse, hotel, Black Hills Tin Company store and office, assembly hall, a weekly newspaper, and six houses for miners and their families. At least 14 more houses were added over the years. It was once proposed that a railroad be built to the town from Iron Creek in Spearfish Canyon, but this was never accomplished. 104,987 pounds (47,621 kg) of tin had been mined from the Rough and Ready Mine alone by 1911.
Current Status: From there, production began to decline but continued in short bursts of activity until the 1950s. Other mining operations in the area were also very successful. In the 1930s, a sawmill was built due to the declining success of the town’s mining operations. During World War II, the mine began producing feldspar and lithium. These gradual changes in operation to less valuable resources contributed to the decline of Tinton. Over several years, other companies took ownership of the town, including The American Tin Plate Company, The Boston Tin Company, The Black Hills Tin Mining Company, and The Tinton Reduction Company. The town was abandoned after a fire destroyed the mill in the 1950s. While many structures are still standing, several have collapsed, and there is no glass in the windows. Today, the town is managed by the mining company Tinton Enterprises. The mines are now back in operation, providing tantalum.
Remarks: Tinton is located at the back of Spearfish Canyon in the Black Hills in Lawrence County, South Dakota. Main Street runs down the Wyoming-South Dakota state line, but the town is most widely accepted to be inside Lawrence County. It is about 6 miles west of Iron Creek. The town is set up on a hill and overlooks the valleys to the east and west, which are full of mines. Several other ghost towns are located nearby.

Travare

County: Roberts
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Trojan

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 44°20′32″N 103°50′17″W / 44.3422063°N 103.8379795°W / 44.3422063
Elevation: 6,434 ft (1,961 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished: 1959
Comments: Trojan, also known as Portland (“-1959), is a ghost town in the Black Hills of Lawrence County, South Dakota, United States. It was created by the Trojan Mining Company. Trojan got its name from its founding company, the Trojan Mining Company. Its earlier name, Portland, came from the nearby Portland Mine.
Remains: As early as 1877, gold was known to be inside Bald Mountain and Green Mountain, located in the Trojan area. By 1900, many claims had been sorted out into only a few, and by 1911, the Trojan Mining Company held the majority of them. In 1928, the Trojan Mining Company was bought out by the Bald Mountain Mining Company. However, by the 1950s, the ore in the Trojan mines was only being sold for $6 per ton, which did not provide enough of a profit to keep the mines in operation. Steel and powder, which were required to run the mines, increased in price, but gold remained $35 an ounce, which it had been since 1934. In 1959, all operations shut down and every mining building, including the miners’ homes, closed. In 1960, the mine’s rails were removed. For a time, the town tried to revive itself by providing for skiers at Terry Peak, but they were not successful.
Current Status: The Bald Mountain Company now owns 2,300 acres (930 ha) of land in the area and is a very prominent mining company in the Black Hills. The Trojan area is considered one of the richest in the Black Hills, and over $20 million worth of minerals, mainly gold and silver, has been extracted from the mines. Some of the cars are still there. Some stores and houses are still there, as well as the buildings at the nearby Portland Mine.
Remarks: Trojan is located in the Black Hills of central Lawrence County, South Dakota, United States.

Twilight

County: Butte
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Two-Bit

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1876
Disestablished: 1900s
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Victoria

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Virginia City

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Volunteer

County: Meade
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Existed in the early 1900s.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Wealthy

County: Pennington
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Westford

County: Custer
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Weta

County: Jackson
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 43° 46′ 28″ N, 101° 43′ 1″ W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Weta is an unincorporated community in Jackson County, in the U.S. state of South Dakota.
Remains: Weta had its start in 1907 when the Milwaukee Railroad was extended to that point. A post office called Weta was established in 1908, and remained in operation until 1939.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Whitetail

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Existed around 1900
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Whitewood City

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Not to be confused with Whitewood, which is still an active community.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Williamsburg

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: The exact location is unknown. The town existed in the early days of the Black Hills Gold Rush.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Winship

County: Brown
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Woodville

County: Lawrence
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Yamboya

County: Custer
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Young

County: Pennington
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

How Many Ghost Towns Are In South Dakota?