Ghost Towns of Oklahoma (A-B)

Ghost Towns Of Oklahoma, United States Ghost Towns

Aaron

County: Jackson
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°35′35″N 99°28′26″W / 34.593°N 99.474°W / 34.593
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Aaron is a ghost town in Jackson County, Oklahoma, United States, located 5 miles (8.0 km) northwest of Olustee. It had a post office from January 22, 1899, until January 14, 1905. The town was named after Calvin Aaron, an early settler.
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Abbott

County: Jack’s Fork
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Abbott is a former community in Jack’s Fork County, Choctaw Nation, in the Indian Territory. The site is located in present-day Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 11 miles northeast of Antlers, Oklahoma.
Remains: Abbott, Indian Territory was granted a United States Post Office on March 3, 1897; it closed on July 11, 1899. The community, a short-lived boomtown created by the logging industry—which used its rail spur to ship timber via the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway—is no longer in existence.
Current Status: More information on Abbott may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society.
Remarks: Prior to Oklahoma’s statehood Abbott was located in Wade County, Choctaw Nation.

Acme

County: Grady
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°47′56″N 98°01′09″W / 34.79889°N 98.01917°W / 34.79889 -98.01917
Elevation: 1,286 ft
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Acme is a ghost town in Grady County, Oklahoma, United States. It had a post office from April 8, 1913, to May 29, 1931. The former community was 3 miles (4.8 km) west of the present community of Rush Springs, Oklahoma.
Remains: The town of Acme developed when the Acme Cement and Plaster Company built a mill and power plant in the area in 1911. Gypsum was mined from the area. The Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad built a spur to serve the plant. At its peak production, the plant employed 100 to 125 workers to produce 6 to 8 railcar loads of product every day. When the nearby gypsum beds were exhausted, the company built a narrow-gauge railroad between the Acme plant and some other beds near the Little Washita River. A flood covered these additional beds with several feet of sand in 1927. Work continued on these beds, but this was unprofitable. After 1930, the entire venture became unprofitable and the company closed everything. The railroad was abandoned in 1930.
Current Status: Very little is left of the former town, except for a few houses and some concrete ruins of the mill. The mill machinery was all moved away. Most of the former supporting structures, such as the school, boarding houses and general store were later torn down.
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Adamson

County: Pittsburg
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34° 55′ 26″ N, 95° 32′ 49″ W
Elevation: 620 ft (190 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Adamson is a ghost town in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States. Comprising 4 square miles, it was located between McAlester and Wilburton. The town contained 15 coal mines. Four mines were major producers. The post office was established on March 1, 1906. The town was named for Peter Adamson, a mine owner.It was a prosperous coal mining town before and during World War I, especially during 1913 to 1919. On September 4, 1914, Adamson was the site of one of the worst coal mine disasters in the United States. The town never recovered economically, and is now considered a ghost town. It has since been largely engulfed by Eufaula Lake.
Remains: Adamson began as a coal mining camp about the turn of the 20th Century. Its population peaked at about 3,500 during World War I, when it had 15 operating mines. The Rock Island and Katy railroads both built spurs ito ship the coal. The Rock Island line was abandoned in 1902, while the Katy remained in service until 1950. One of the worst mining disasters in Oklahoma occurred at Mine No. 1 on September 4, 1914. It began to collapse One of the miners reported a cracking sound about 3:30 P.M., and the mine workers were immediately ordered to evacuate. Nearly all of the miners quickly ascended to the surface, but fourteen were trapped at the lowest level, They were buried when the entire mine collapsed. Neither rescue nor recovery of bodies was possible. The surface of the ground sank dropped between 8 feet (2.4 m) and 10 feet (3.0 m).
Current Status: A 1957 publication reported that Adamson then had about ten houses and two small grocery stores, which catered mostly to people visiting nearby Eufaula Lake. As of 2014, Anna Benedict reported that there were many families thriving in Adamson. The post office and grocery was no longer there, but a church was flourishing. A few of the original families that used to work in the mines still reside in Adamson with their families. The mines had all been closed and had filled with water.
Remarks: The last man to come out of the mine before it completely collapsed was Anthony Benedict. He created a monument to honor the deceased miners on his farm off of the Hartshorne-Adamson Road.

Addington

County: Jefferson
Zip Code: 73520
Latitude / Longitude: 34°14′36″N 97°58′0″W / 34.24333°N 97.96667°W / 34.24333
Elevation: 938 ft (286 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Addington is a town in Jefferson County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 114 at the 2010 census, a decrease of 2.6 percent from 117 at the 2000 census. The town was founded in 1890.
Remains: The post office was established on January 8, 1896. The name of the town comes from the name of its first postmaster, James P. Addington. Located on the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad. Daniel Leal was the first mayor, appointed by the governor. Former newspapers were the Addington Free Lance, the Addington Advertiser, the Addington Journal, and the Addington Herald.
Current Status: The town was incorporated in 1901. The peak population was in about 1915, with 1000 citizens. The town’s growth stopped about the time World War I began, and has continued to decline ever since. The post office in Addington is slated for possible closure by the US Postal service.
Remarks: Addington is located at 34°14’36″N 97°58’0″W (34.243206, -97.966591). It is 6 miles (9.7 km) north and 2 miles (3.2 km) west of Waurika, Oklahoma. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2), all of it land.

Agawam

County: Grady
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1909
Disestablished: 1919
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Alhambra

County: Johnston
Zip Code:
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1896
Disestablished: 1904
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Alluwe

County: Nowata
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36° 36′ 37″ N, 95° 29′ 14″ W
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Alluwe is a ghost town in Nowata County, Oklahoma, United States. The post office was established as Lightening Creek on October 23, 1872 after the namesake waterway. On June 27, 1883, the town was renamed Alluwe. The post office existed under this new name until July 31, 1909.
Remains: Settled as a community by the Delaware Indians. Oil was discovered in 1905.
Current Status: In the 1950s the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers constructed the Oologah Dam across the Verdigris River to form Oologah Lake. The townsite was purchased by the government since it was within the Oologah Reservoir project area. Many residents moved a short distance eastward and formed New Alluwe.
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Alpha

County: Kingfisher
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°52’13″N 98°6’2″W
Elevation: 1165 feet (355 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Alpha is an unincorporated community in Kingfisher County, Oklahoma, United States. Its altitude is 1165 feet (355 m). The post office was established November 7, 1893, and closed December 14, 1903. The Alpha site is 5½ miles east of Omega.
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Current Status: The Alpha school district closed in 1947. The Alpha Schoolhouse, the last structure in Alpha, was moved to the Frontier Country Historical Society Museum in Crescent in 2005.
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Alsuma

County: Tulsa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°05′42″N 95°51′48″W / 36.09500°N 95.86333°W / 36.09500
Elevation: 660 ft (201 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Alsuma was a rural community between Tulsa and Broken Arrow, Oklahoma in Tulsa County, Oklahoma. Its post office opened in 1905, named Welcome, Oklahoma, but was renamed Alsuma in 1906. Another version states that the town was named for John Alsuma, a local merchant. According to a long-time resident, the town was renamed for three women: Alice, Susan and Mabel. Legend has it that a squabble among the three town leaders about an appropriate name was settled in a face saving way. Their wives were named Alice, Susie and Mary. It was suggested that the first two letters of each woman’s name be combined. The community covered as much as 165 acres (67 ha) and held a population of 75 families. The post office discontinued service in 1926. It is now considered a ghost town. The name is still used locally in referring to a specific area of southeast Tulsa.
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Current Status: Few physical traces of Alsuma still exist inside the Tulsa city limits, on 51 Street between Mingo Road and the Mingo Valley Expressway. Alsuma had its own park, where both black and white children played during the era of segregation. This was prohibited by law in the segregated Tulsa city parks. The Tulsa Park and Recreation Department still lists Alsuma Park at 9801 E. 51st Street as a recreation area, but it is used primarily for storm water retention. There are soccer fields in the pond area, but all playground equipment has disappeared. There are still some residences remaining, but officially Alsuma is regarded as a ghost town.
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America

County: McCurtain
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 33° 48′ 55″ N, 94° 32′ 55″ W
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: America is a ghost town in southeastern McCurtain County, Oklahoma, United States. It was located 7 miles southeast of Haworth. The town was named after America Stewart, wife of Tom Stewart, a local resident.
Remains: America grew around a sawmill built by William Spencer and his three brothers in 1907. The Spencer family built 40 houses to lease to sawmill workers, and by 1910 there were 200 people living in America. In 1911, after all the timber had been cut, Spencer opened a cotton gin and general store and became a cotton buyer. Cotton grown on the cleared land was shipped out by the Arkansas and Choctaw Railway (‘Frisco) that ran through the town. After cotton production declined in the 1920s, most residents moved out. The cotton gin closed in 1933, around the time when the Great Depression was at its worst. Buck and Blanche Barrow, associates of Bonnie & Clyde were married in America on July 3, 1931. The post office, established since July 24, 1903, was disestablished on February 15, 1944. The general store closed the next year, completing the decline.
Current Status: Today, part of the former townsite of America is in the Ouachita National Forest. Only two old houses and a railroad marker remain.
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Antioch

County: Garvin
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34° 43′ 30″ N, 97° 24′ 20″ W
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Antioch is a ghost town in Garvin County, Oklahoma, United States. It was located 10 miles west of Pauls Valley and had a post office from September 6, 1895 until May 14, 1932.
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Arthur

County: Stephens
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Arthur is a ghost town in Stephens County, Oklahoma, United States. It was 15 miles east of Duncan, Oklahoma and had a post office from May 14, 1890 until September 29, 1934.
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Autwine

County: Kay
Zip Code: 296 m (971 ft)
Latitude / Longitude: 36° 43′ 19″ N, 97° 13′ 47″ W
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1894
Disestablished:
Comments: Autwine is a ghost town in Kay County, Oklahoma, United States, formerly known as Pierceton and Virginia City. It had a post office as Pierceton from May 26, 1894 and as Autwine from March 5, 1903, until June 30, 1922. The town declined as an agricultural center after better roads in the area led to farmers taking their business to the larger business centers. Today there is nothing left of the old townsite and the area is used for agriculture.
Remains: The town was served by the Hutchinson and South Railway(Santa Fe). The town was first called Virginia City and was platted on June 17, 1899. Its post office was named Pierceton and the railroad called the station Arta. A meeting was held to determine a single name for the town and agreed upon Autwine. The town was named after Antwine Roy, a Ponca Indian chief. There are two different stories of how the name was Autwine instead of Antwine. In one version the Santa Fe railroad agent misspelled the name and refused to change it. In the other the town clerk’s poor penmanship on a record caused the name to come back from Washington as Autwine instead of Antwine.
Current Status: All land from the town is now used for agriculture. Nothing is left. The Autwine Oilfield in Kay County is named after the city.
Remarks: As roads were improved in the early 1900s Autwine declined as a trading center. The bank closed in 1904. Fire destroyed the business district in 1905, burning the grocery, dry-goods store, depot, blacksmith shop, general merchandise store, hardware store and part of the lumberyard. Only one empty business was left standing. Most of the businesses did not rebuild. By 1910 there was only one general store, a blacksmith shop, and one elevator in business. The school was destroyed by tornado in 1912. Last store closed in 1930 and the elevator closed shortly thereafter.

Avard

County: Woods
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°41′57″N 98°47′24″W / 36.69917°N 98.79000°W / 36.69917
Elevation: 1,476 ft (450 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Avard was a town in Woods County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 26 at the 2000 census and is sometimes considered a ghost town. After initial growth Avard began declining in the 1930s. Avard had a post office from June 1, 1895, until November 22, 1963. As of the 2010 census, Avard was listed as disincorporated.
Remains: The post office was first established in Avard in 1895 and the town was incorporated in 1904 when the Frisco tracks were extended westward from Enid to tie in with the Santa Fe. The town was named for Isabell Avard Todd, the wife of Robert Todd. The town was served by the Southern Arkansas Railway (Santa Fe) and Arkansas Valley and Western Railroad (Frisco). Avard had mercantile establishments, two hotels, a bank, a livestock auction, and an elevator. A weekly newspaper, the Avard Tribune operated from 1904 to 1918. It was a major cattle shipping point for the area. 250 people lived in the town in 1909. It was an important rail transfer point for freight and passengers from 1910 to 1930.
Current Status: Today only a cafe, elevator and church are left in operation. There are also a few unused store buildings.
Remarks: Avard continued to grow until the mid-1930s. During this period the town declined due to the economic depression, dust storms, farm consolidation, and changing travel habits. Additionally the town was struck by tornadoes in 1943 and 1944.

Avery

County: Lincoln
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°53′2″N 96°45′8″W / 35.88389°N 96.75222°W / 35.88389 -96.75222
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Avery is a ghost town in Lincoln County, Oklahoma, United States. The community had a post office from September 16, 1902, until August 26, 1957. Founded as Mound City, it was renamed for Eastern Oklahoma Railway worker Avery Turner after the railroad built through the community.
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Avoca

County: Pottawatomie
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°0′50″N 96°55′50″W / 35.01389°N 96.93056°W / 35.01389 -96.93056
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Avoca was a small town in Avoca Township, located in southeastern Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma Territory. The post office was established in 1894 and closed permanently in 1906.
Remains: Avoca should not be confused with Avoca Township, which covered a much larger area than the town itself. This section of the article will cover the entire township, with the remainder the town itself. Avoca township was located in southeastern Pottawatomie County, with Konawa Municipal Township (and the Seminole County line) to the east, St. Louis Township to the north and the South Canadian River to the south. The western boundary was about two and a half miles west of present-day Asher. The township encompassed about 75 square miles.
Current Status: In 1901, “Old Beck,” a rail spur from Shawnee, was extended to the fledgling community of Asher, Oklahoma, a few miles south. This event spelled the demise of Avoca. In the winter of that year, the postmaster, George A. McCurry, moved the Avoca post office and his store to the new community. The change officially took place on November 26, 1901. This was done without permission from the government and left Avoca without a post office. The post office was re-established on February 10, 1902. However, many persons and businesses moved to the growing Asher community. An Asher paper reported “Avoca About Abandoned” on August 21, 1903 and the post office was discontinued again on October 31, 1906. The upstart of Asher is often blamed for the demise of Avoca. Currently in the Avoca area is the Avoca Church of Christ, a cemetery, and a few homes.
Remarks: The village was established in the mid-19th century as Wewaukee Springs (Wewaukee is Seminole for “tumbling water”). It was located along the “Wagon Road” that traveled east to west across the territory. Early residents of the town included Seminole Indians as well as white persons. By 1910, most Seminoles had left the area Pottawatomi Indians populated the town.

Bailey

County: Grady
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°42′58″N 97°47′53″W / 34.71611°N 97.79806°W / 34.71611 -97.79806
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Bailey is a ghost town in Grady County, Oklahoma, United States. It was 12 miles northeast of Marlow, Oklahoma and had a post office from June 25, 1892, until September 30, 1932. It was named after J. J. Bailey, a wagon master on a stage line to Fort Sill.
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Bathsheba

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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Bathsheba (Hebrew: “” “””, Bat Sheva, “daughter of the oath”) or Bethsheba is a ghost town that was located in Oklahoma, United States. While its exact location is unknown, it was located between Enid, Oklahoma and Perry, Oklahoma. The town was created to be a utopia for women and no men were allowed. Even male animals were barred from the colony. The town is also the subject of a fiction book by Barbara DeVault entitled A Gentle Breed: The Story of Bathsheba, A Town Without Men.
Remains: Its population consisted of 33 females, 12 of whom left the town after one week. The town’s government consisted of a mayor, a police chief and a city council. The police chief’s primary function was to guard the community from possible male visitors. It existed for a period of about 12 weeks before its residents vacated. In 1961, Oklahoma historian Robert Cunningham retold the story of an unnamed Kansas reporter who visited the settlement and was shot at by the female police chief while exploring the settlement from afar. A crowd of other colonists had gathered, and fled to their tents after the incident. The reporter later returned to the settlement at the request of his editor to find only prairie.
Current Status: Female boomer, Annette Daisy, gathered thirty-four women to establish a homestead “across the sacred borders of which no man shall pass.” The Daisy Colonists settled on 480 acres (1.9 km2), a few miles west of Ponca. This settlement had two houses and four shelters by December 1893. While the story is similar, neither the town name of Bethsheba nor Annette Daisy appear in Garfield County records.
Remarks: The existence of Bethsheba is disputed by scholars. In researching for his book Ghost Towns of Oklahoma, Dr. John W. Morris was “unable to specifically locate” the town.

Beck

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Beer City

County: Texas
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1888
Disestablished: 1890
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Bell

County: Adair
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°44′14″N 94°31′19″W / 35.73722°N 94.52194°W / 35.73722 -94.52194
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Bell is a census-designated place (CDP) in Adair County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 535 at the 2010 census, an 11.1 percent decline from 602 at the 2000 census.
Remains: In the early 1980s, the Cherokee Nation, under the direction of Wilma Mankiller (then the director of the Cherokee Nation Community Development Department, later principal chief) and her colleague (and future husband) Charlie Soap, put together a project to build a 16-mile waterline to Bell, where many of the residents still had no indoor plumbing. The tribe provided equipment and technological assistance, while Bell residents contributed most of the labor on a volunteer basis. The project drew widespread attention and launched Mankiller’s political career. The project is the subject of a 2013 feature film, The Cherokee Word for Water.
Current Status: In June 2010, after systemic auditing by the Oklahoma state Board of Education, the 200-year-old school district was demanded to be closed by the state. This was due to declared financial impropriety discovered during the auditing process. The Kindergarten through Eighth grade district, composed 97% by Cherokee children, was merged with two separate district. The Stilwell and Belfonte school districts will take fiscal responsibility for the students from the Bell district, and the former Bell school building will remain open.
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Benton

County: Beaver
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1880s
Disestablished: 1920
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Bernice

County: Delaware
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°37′31″N 94°54′49″W / 36.62528°N 94.91361°W / 36.62528
Elevation: 761 ft (232 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Bernice is a town in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 562 at the 2010 census, an increase of 11.5 percent from 504 at the 2000 census. The town is now primarily a vacation and retirement area. It claims to be the “Crappie Fishing Capital of the World.”
Remains: Bernice was founded in 1912, after Rose Mode and his partner, Charles Lee, bought 60 acres (24 ha) of land in the Horse Creek Basin of northwestern Delaware County. The town was named for Mode’s daughter, Bernice. A post office was established on February 12, 1913, and the town soon becomes a local agricultural center. By 1918, Bernice had an estimated population on nearly 400 people. Businesses included a bank, a milliner, a grain elevator, a sawmill, a hotel, a flour mill, and three general stores. The population declined after World War I and the Great Depression from 198 in 1920 to 162 in 1930, and 91 in 1940. After World War II, population growth rebounded to 318 in 1980.
Current Status: At present, the town serves as a vacation spot for many residents of surrounding communities. Indian Hills Resort, the oldest recreational business in the town, was established in 1940. Bernice State Park, about one-half mile east of town, across the Neosho River, also attracts vacationers.
Remarks: Construction of Pensacola Dam and Grand Lake o’ the Cherokees put the original town in a flood plain, so the residents moved to high ground outside the proposed one.

Bethel

County: Comanche
Zip Code: 73501
Latitude / Longitude: 34°35’39″N 98°09’33″W
Elevation: 1,129 ft (344 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Bethel is a rural unincorporated community along State Highway 7 in Comanche County, Oklahoma, United States, east of Lawton.
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Bickford

County: Blaine
Zip Code:
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1904
Disestablished: 1927
Comments: Site occupied by Roman Nose State Park
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Big Canyon

County: Murray
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1961
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Big Cedar

County: Le Flore
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34° 38′ 45″ N, 94° 38′ 56″ W
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Blackburn

County: Pawnee
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°22′18″N 96°35′47″W / 36.37167°N 96.59639°W / 36.37167
Elevation: 810 ft (247 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Blackburn is a town in Pawnee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 108 at the 2010 census, up 5.9 percent from 102 at the 2000 census. It is 12 miles (19 km) east of the city of Pawnee.
Remains: Located on the south side of the Arkansas River at a natural ford, the community of Blackburn developed after the opening of the Cherokee Outlet on September 16, 1893. It was named for Kentucky Senator Joseph C. S. Blackburn. A post office was established on December 15, 1893. Because it was located in Oklahoma Territory, Blackburn was a “whiskey town” that bordered Indian Territory until statehood in 1907. The town was incorporated on April 21, 1909.
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Boggy Depot

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°19′13″N 96°18′51″W / 34.32028°N 96.31417°W / 34.32028
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1838
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Comments: Boggy Depot is a ghost town and Oklahoma State Park that was formerly a significant city in the Indian Territory. It grew as a vibrant and thriving town in present-day Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States, and became a major trading center on the Texas Road and the Butterfield Overland Mail route between Missouri and San Francisco. After the American Civil War when the MKT Railroad came through, it bypassed Boggy Depot and the town began a steady decline. It was soon replaced by Atoka as the chief city in the area. By the early 20th century, all that remained of the community was a sort of ghost town.
Remains: Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians founded the town in 1837. The United States government had moved the Choctaws and Chickasaws to Indian Territory from Mississippi and Alabama in the 1830s. While at first, the two tribes lived together on the Choctaw land, the Chickasaws later emigrated to the western portions of the Indian Territory and formed their own separate nation on land transferred to them by the Choctaw.
Current Status: Today little remains of the original town except for a few stone foundations and the cemetery. Choctaw Chief Allen Wright and the Reverend Cyrus Kingsbury are buried there. Boggy Depot Park 34°19’14″N 96°18’28″W, formerly known as Boggy Depot State Park, is a recreation area that commemorates the old town and the history of the area. The park gets its name from Clear Boggy Creek and from its use as a Confederate commissary depot during the Civil War. The park features a fishing lake, nature trail, baseball diamond, playground, picnic tables, group picnic shelters, charcoal grills, and comfort stations with showers. After the state announced that it would close the park as a budget-cutting measure, the Choctaw tribe took over ownership and management responsibilities. This is no longer a state park. Boggy Depot was added to the National Register of Historic Places (#72001050) in 1972.
Remarks: The Chickasaw nation was reluctant to spend its funds on major capital improvements unless it had clear title to the property. In 2013, the Oklahoma House of Representatives considered a bill to transfer ownership of the property to the Chickasaws.

Bookertee

County: Okfuskee
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Braithwaite

County: Washita
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1910
Disestablished: 1923
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Bridgeport

County: Caddo
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°32′48″N 98°23′0″W / 35.54667°N 98.38333°W / 35.54667
Elevation: 1,428 feet (435 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Bridgeport is a town in Caddo County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 116 at the 2010 census.
Remains: Bridgeport was so named on account of there being a toll bridge over the Canadian River at that point.
Current Status: Bridgeport is located on the northern border of Caddo County at 35°32’48″N 98°23’0″W (35.546717, -98.383401) and at an elevation of 1,428 feet (435 m). It is bordered to the north by Blaine County. The town is built on the south side of the valley of the Canadian River, overlooking its floodplain. Former U.S. Route 66 is 0.5 miles (0.80 km) to the south of the town, and Interstate 40 runs one-half mile further south, though the closest access is 2 miles (3 km) to the east at Exit 101. Downtown Oklahoma City is 52 miles (84 km) east of Bridgeport.
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Brinkman

County: Greer
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Latitude / Longitude: 35°0′36″N 99°31′0″W / 35.01000°N 99.51667°W / 35.01000 -99.51667
Elevation: 1,693 ft (516 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Brinkman is an unincorporated community in Greer County, Oklahoma, United States. It lies at the western end of State Highway 34B, nine miles north of Mangum and one mile west of U.S. Route 283.
Remains: Brinkman was founded in 1910, and named after John Brinkman, who was a business associate of railroad builders Joseph A. Kemp and Frank Kell. A post office opened on June 17, 1910, and by 1925 the high school had over 450 students. It was a market town for the surrounding area and had two large elevators as well as other amenities. But the bank closed in 1927, and a fire destroyed half the town in 1929. Most of the buildings were never rebuilt. Oklahoma State Highway 34, constructed in 1931, bypassed the town to the east, accelerating the decline.
Current Status: The school closed in 1957. On December 30, 1965, the post office closed. The school building had been removed and the school district consolidated into a still larger unit. In 1972 the railroad that started the town was abandoned, and in 1974 the tracks were taken up. With the end of this activity, Brinkman ceased to exist. By 1980 there were only a few residents left here. Today, all that remains there are a few old buildings and a very small population. Brinkman is now considered a ghost town. A community historical marker was erected in 2012.
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Bromide

County: Johnston, Coal
Zip Code: 74530
Latitude / Longitude: 34°25′4″N 96°29′40″W / 34.41778°N 96.49444°W / 34.41778
Elevation: 709 ft (216 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Bromide is a town in Coal and Johnston counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The population was 165 at the 2010 census, a 1.2 percent increase from 163 at the 2000 census. The area around Bromide was noted for its mineral water springs, and the bromide content of the water gave the town its name. It was also noted for limestone quarrying and the potential to produce manganese. Proposals to promote economic growth from these assets never materialized.
Remains: Bromide was founded by Judge William H. Jackson, a former superintendent of the nearby Wapanucka Academy, who recognized the site near several mineral springs as a potential tourist attraction. The community was initially called Juanita (1905 – 1906), then Zenobia (1906 – 1907), before it was named Bromide. It incorporated in July 1908. Juanita and Zenobia were names of two of Jackson’s daughters. The name Bromide was chosen because of the high content of bromine in the mineral water.
Current Status: Manganese (chemical symbol: Mn) ore was discovered in the vicinity of bromide in 1890. A report published by the U.S. Geological Service (USGS) stated that the ore deposits were small and could not yield high-grade ore (more than 45 percent Mn. However, during World War I, steel producers began accepting ores as low as 35 percent Mn. The USGS report said that about 5,000 tons of ore containing 35 to 40 percent Mn could be produced from the Bromide area deposits. Oilman Robert Galbreath evidently thought this could become sufficiently profitable to be a worthwhile investment. However, the Great Depression put an end to the concept. The nearby Wapanucka Academy site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places (NR72001065).
Remarks: Before Oklahoma statehood, the townsite was part of the Chickasaw Nation. Native Americans were well acquainted with the mineral springs in the area. The Chickasaws called these Oka-Alichi (Medicine Water) or Hopi Kuli (Salt Springs), and believed that the waters had medicinal power, especially for “rheumatism, diseases of the stomach, kidney and bladder aliments, nerve and skin problems”.

Burke City

County: Okfuskee
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Button Springs

County: Johnston
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Byron

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How Many Ghost Towns Are In Oklahoma?