Ghost Towns of Oklahoma (F-K)

Oklahoma State Flag

Fallis

County: Lincoln
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°44′58″N 97°7′18″W / 35.74944°N 97.12167°W / 35.74944
Elevation: 971 ft (296 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Fallis is a town in Lincoln County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 27 at the 2010 census, a loss of 3.6 percent from 28 at the 2000 census.
Remains: Fallis was founded in 1892, just south of an Indian village on the western edge of the Iowa Reservation, in a wooded area and “on a long red hill.” Originally named Mission 1892-1894, it was renamed in 1894 for its prime developer and first postmaster, Judge William Henry Fallis. Although the town is mostly abandoned today, and is nearly a ghost town, during the early 1900s Fallis was a whistle-stop for several railroad lines, and was a thriving little community with stores, hotels, banks, lumber yards, and other businesses, as well as a city hall. The population may have reached 400 during this time. Fallis was the home of several accomplished authors and poets.
Current Status: After the Great Depression, the Dust Bowl, and the decline of the railroad, by 1950 the population had fallen to just 105 residents, and much of the town was destroyed by fire in 1960. Very little of the old town was ever rebuilt, and only a handful of buildings remain. However, Fallis still maintains a volunteer firestation, and a community center was built in 1999.
Remarks:

Fame

County: McIntosh
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°21′44″N 95°38′45″W / 35.36222°N 95.64583°W / 35.36222
Elevation: 604 ft (184 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Fame is an unincorporated community in McIntosh County, Oklahoma, United States. The community is located on the western shore of Lake Eufaula 3 miles (4.8 km) east of Stidham.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Fennell

County: Choctaw
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Ferguson

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Fisher

County: Tulsa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Fleetwood

County: Johnston
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 33°53′48″N 97°51′04″W / 33.89667°N 97.85111°W / 33.89667 -97.85111
Elevation: 846 ft (258 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Fleetwood is an unincorporated community in Jefferson County, Oklahoma. It was named after H.H. Fleetwood, who was a ferry operator on the Red River. A post office operated in Fleetwood from 1885 to 1961.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Foraker

County: Osage
Zip Code: 74652
Latitude / Longitude: 36°52′21″N 96°33′56″W / 36.87250°N 96.56556°W / 36.87250
Elevation: 1,280 ft (390 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Foraker is a town in Osage County, Oklahoma, United States. It was named for Ohio Senator Joseph B. Foraker. The Tallgrass Prairie Preserve is southeast of town. The official population peaked at 415 in 1910 and has declined steadily since 1930. The population was only 19 at the 2010 census, a 17.4 percent decline from 23 at the 2000 census.
Remains: Located in an area of rolling plains and tallgrass prairie, a post office was established at Foraker on February 13, 1903. The town began as a 160-acre tract platted by the U.S. Department of the Interior along the Midland Valley Railroad in 1905. By 1909, the town had a population of 500 as the area underwent a ranching and farming boom. Foraker had the amenities associated with older communities: sidewalks, a public park, and plans for an electric and water system and a substantial school building.
Current Status: The agriculture boom subsided but the town was briefly revitalized by discovery of the Burbank Oil Field in 1920, which made Foraker an oil industry equipment supply center. In 1922 the Osage Railway was opened from Foraker to Shidler, Oklahoma, ten miles away, making Foraker an oil shipping point. The population rose to about 2,000 in the early 1920s. The Osage County oil boom declined during the Great Depression, and with it Foraker’s fortunes. The population dropped. The Osage Valley railroad was abandoned in 1953 and the Midland Valley Railroad was abandoned in 1968. The town business district fell vacant. Foraker is now in a region dominated by large cattle ranches. A lonely and picturesque old cemetery in the prairie about a mile east of what remains of the town is the chief landmark. The nearest post office is at Shidler.
Remarks: Foraker is now considered a ghost town. A historian quoted one long-time resident as saying: “Stores gone, post office gone, train gone, school gone, oil gone, boys and girls gone – only thing not gone is graveyard and it git bigger.”

Foss

County: Washita
Zip Code: 73647
Latitude / Longitude: 35°27′12″N 99°10′15″W / 35.45333°N 99.17083°W / 35.45333
Elevation: 1,640 ft (500 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Foss is a town in Washita County, Oklahoma, United States. As of the 2010 census, the town population was 151, an 18.9 percent increase from 127 at the 2000 census.
Remains: The history of Foss began when settlers from the area of the Wilson post office moved four miles north to the valley of Turkey Creek in the late 1890s. They initially wanted their new post office to be called Graham, but since that name was already taken it was named Maharg (an anagram of Graham). A flash flood on May 2, 1902 wiped out the town on Turkey Creek, destroying businesses and drowning several people. The town rebuilt on higher ground and was named Foss. The post office began operation on September 15, 1900.
Current Status: Though in the 1950s and 1960s there was an economic revival due to the nearby Clinton-Sherman Air Force Base at Burns Flat. When the base closed and Interstate 40 bypassed Foss the town declined further. The last bank left in September 1977. Foss had two newspapers, the Foss Enterprise and the Foss Banner. It was served by the Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad (Rock Island) railroad. The Enterprise went out of business in the 1930s. Foss was an important agricultural center in the early part of the 20th century. It has declined in importance, but is still a small agricultural center.
Remarks: The town expanded rapidly. By 1905 the town had a population between 900 and 1000 residents. It had two banks, three cotton gins, and by 1912 had an electric plant, two hotels and an opera house. It also had plants to manufacture hay balers, baby carriages, and brooms. The population stabilized near 500. In the 1920s the town began to have economic problems as the nearby cities of Clinton and Elk City absorbed more and more trade. During the Great Depression more people moved away. During World War II, the town boasted a population of over 300 residents, relying primarily on Route 66 travellers (which passed half a mile south of the city) and a U.S. naval base south of the town that operated during wartime. A gas station and a café also operated in the town around that time.

Fowlerville

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Francis

County: Pontotoc
Zip Code: 74844
Latitude / Longitude: 34°52′23″N 96°35′30″W / 34.87306°N 96.59167°W / 34.87306
Elevation: 945 ft (288 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Francis is a town in Pontotoc County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 332 at the 2000 census.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Frazer

County: Jackson
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Relocated to higher ground and renamed Altus
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Garnetville

County: Oklahoma
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1892
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Gas City

County: Stephens
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Gee

County: Pushmataha
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Gee is a community in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 11 miles southeast of Clayton, Oklahoma. A United States Post Office operated here from May 22, 1909 to November 30, 1911.
Remains:
Current Status: No longer in existence, it was named for Henry V. Gee, first postmaster. Gee (1868-1916) is buried in the cemetery in Nolia, Oklahoma, a nearby community.
Remarks: More information on Gee and the Little River valley may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society.

Gene Autry

County: Carter
Zip Code: 73436
Latitude / Longitude: 34°16′55″N 97°2′13″W / 34.28194°N 97.03694°W / 34.28194
Elevation: 732 ft (223 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Gene Autry is a town in Carter County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 158 as of the 2010 census, up from 99 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Ardmore, Oklahoma Micropolitan Statistical Area.
Remains: Originally named “Lou” by C.C. Henderson for his wife, the post office was established July 11, 1883. On November 22, 1883, it was renamed “Dresden”. The name was changed to “Berwyn” on September 1, 1887, one of several towns along the Santa Fe railroad line through the Oklahoma Territory (re)named for stations on the “Main Line” of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Finally, on November 16, 1941, it was renamed “Gene Autry” to honor the singer and motion picture star. Though Autry was born in Tioga, Texas, his family moved to Oklahoma while he was an infant. He was raised in the southern Oklahoma towns of Achille and Ravia.
Current Status: In 1939 he bought the 1,200-acre (4.9 km2) Flying A Ranch on the west edge of Berwyn, and the town decided to honor him by changing its name. Approximately 35,000 people attended the ceremonies broadcast live from the site on Autry’s Melody Ranch radio show. Current Mayor Kyle L Lawson Vice-Mayor John Wickware, Town Council Thressa Walker and Robert Gillio.
Remarks:

Gibson Station

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Glenwood

County: Oklahoma
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Gotebo

County: Kiowa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°04′16″N 98°52′28″W / 35.0710978°N 98.8743742°W / 35.0710978
Elevation: 1,430 ft (440 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Gotebo /’go”t”bo”/ is a town in Kiowa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 226 at the 2010 census, a loss of 16.9 percent from 272 at the 2000 census. The town is named after the notable Kiowa Indian named Gotebo (1847 – 1927) (in Kiowa, [k’ó”debõhõn]).
Remains: The town now known as Gotebo was originally named Harrison (honoring President Benjamin Harrison) when it was founded in August 1901, during the opening of the Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache Reservation. A railroad station had been built nearby a few months before, which officials of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway had named Gotebo, in honor of a well-respected Kiowa chief. He was one of the first Kiowa baptized at the Rainy Mountain Church, and was buried at the Rainy Mountain Indian Cemetery, between Gotebo and Mountain View. The name of the post office was soon changed from Harrison to Gotebo, and the town incorporated under the latter name.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Grand

County: Ellis
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Grand was the one-time county seat of Ellis County, Oklahoma. First established as Ioland to be the county seat of “E” County (later Day County) when the Cheyenne Arapaho reserve was opened, it was moved across the Canadian River and renamed Grand.
Remains: When Day County was extinguished at statehood, Grand found itself in Ellis County, and was the county seat until August 26, 1908. The Ellis County courthouse moved to Arnett. The Grand post office existed from November 4, 1892, until September 30, 1943.
Current Status: Only the footings of the courthouse and the vault that held the county records remain visible at the site. Grand was the birthplace of western musician Spade Cooley. The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1972 as the Grand Town Site.
Remarks:

Gumbo Pit

County: Oklahoma
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Hale

County: Tulsa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Hanson

County: Le Flore
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Flooded by Arkansas River.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Harrison

County: Sequoyah
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1908
Disestablished: 1912
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Helsel

County: Cleveland
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Hext

County: Beckham
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35°14’51″N 99°45’10″W
Elevation: 1,923 ft (586 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Hext is a small unincorporated rural community on old U.S. Highway 66 in Beckham County, Oklahoma, United States. The town was named after a local resident, William Hext.
Remains: It had a post office from June 4, 1901, until November 29, 1902. The stone gas station on Old Route 66 was converted into a home and the pumps were removed.
Current Status: There are no businesses in this area. The major economic activities in the area are horse breeding and farming.
Remarks:

Hochatown

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°09′30.49″N 94°45′16.55″W / 34.1584694°N 94.7545972°W / 34.1584694
Elevation: 715 ft (217 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Hockerville

County: Ottawa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1916
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Holder

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Hollister

County: Tillman
Zip Code: 73551
Latitude / Longitude: 34°20′28″N 98°52′14″W / 34.3411153°N 98.8705256°W / 34.3411153
Elevation: 1,129 ft (344 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Hollister is a town in Tillman County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 50 at the 2010 census, a decline of 16.7 percent from 60 at the 2000 census.
Remains: The Wichita Falls and Northwestern Railway (later the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway) founded Hollister in 1907 as a depot on its line from Wichita Falls, Texas to Frederick, Oklahoma. Hollister was built between the towns of Isadore and Parton. Many of its buildings were moved from Parton. Originally, this was the location of a railroad switch known as “Happy Jack,” “Happy Spur,” or just “Happy.” The first station was a boxcar, and the first train arrived on November 16, 1907. The town was named for Harry L. Hollister, the depot agent in Frederick. A post office was established on February 1, 1909.
Current Status: Hollister’s population peaked at 200 in 1940, then began a decline to 105 in 1970. The high school closed in 1963 and the grade school in 1968. At the turn of the 21st Century, Hollister had a post office, a Baptist church and two grain elevators.
Remarks:

Hope

County: Atoka
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°14′00″N 96°22′23″W / 34.23333°N 96.37306°W / 34.23333 -96.37306
Elevation: 722 ft (220 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Hopewell is an unincorporated community in Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States. It lies at an elevation of 722 feet (220 m).
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Hoxbar

County: Carter
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Humphreys

County: Jackson
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Huntville

County: Kingfisher
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Indianapolis

County: Pitkin
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 39°6′23″N 106°36′19″W / 39.10639°N 106.60528°W / 39.10639
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1880s
Disestablished:
Comments: Independence is a ghost town in the U.S. state of Colorado. It is located just off State Highway 82 in the eastern corner of Pitkin County, below the Continental Divide. It was the first settlement established in the Roaring Fork Valley, after gold was struck in the vicinity on Independence Day, July 4, 1879, hence its name.
Remains: In 1973 it was recognized as a historic district and listed on the National Register of Historic Places as Independence and Independence Mill Site, one of two ghost towns in the county so recognized. It has also been known historically by other names—Chipeta, Mammoth City, Mount Hope, Farwell, Sparkill and Hunter’s Pass.
Current Status: It has been a ghost town since at least 1912. The remaining structures, all log cabins of various sizes, are now on land partially in White River National Forest. It is one of the few abandoned mining camps in the state where any buildings are left. In the late 20th century they were restored and interpretive materials added.
Remarks: Like other early settlements in the upper Roaring Fork Valley, it lost population over the course of the decade as Aspen emerged as the ideal location for commerce in the region, and then became the county seat. It was never able to overcome the severe winters that resulted from its location at a high elevation in the mountains, and at the end of the 19th century all but one of the remaining residents abandoned Independence en masse after a particularly heavy snowstorm to settle in Aspen.

Independence

County: Custer
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35° 33′ 5″ N, 98° 51′ 45″ W
Elevation: 1,669 ft (509 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1890
Disestablished:
Comments: Indianapolis, Oklahoma is a former unincorporated community in Custer County, Oklahoma.
Remains: Originally a settlement set directly off a railroad, Indianapolis was inhabited from the 1800s to the late 1900s.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Ingalls

County: Payne
Zip Code: 74074
Latitude / Longitude: 36°6′6″N 96°52′53″W / 36.10167°N 96.88139°W / 36.10167
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Ingalls is a ghost town in eastern Payne County, Oklahoma, about 10 miles (16 km) east of Stillwater. The town was settled as a result of the “Unassigned Lands” land run in 1889, and had a post office from January 22, 1890, until October 31, 1907. It was named for Senator John J. Ingalls of Kansas. During the 1890s the population peaked at about 150, then began to decline.
Remains: Ingalls became notable as the site of the Battle of Ingalls on September 1, 1893, which was a shootout between U.S. Marshals and the Doolin-Dalton gang. Three deputy marshals and two residents were killed, one of the residents being killed while shooting at the marshals. Several people were wounded, including two of the outlaws, and one outlaw was captured. A stone monument stands at Ingalls on Ash Street, an unmarked street by the fire station, a short distance from where one of the deputies was shot. A new post office, named Signet, Oklahoma, was established on a site northeast of the old Ingalls townsite on June 21, 1921, and became part of a new community. The residents protested and the name was then officially changed back to Ingalls.
Current Status: Today, the population is an estimated 150, like in its heyday. The land lots are mainly owned by three families that have lived in or near the town for at least 70 years, the Radford/Sharptons, the Burtons, and the Mathesons. Every Saturday night, seniors with ties to the community gather at the Ingalls Community Center for a music show. Usually, a reenactment of the Battle occurs on Sept. 1st of every year, but many of the actors have been getting older and unable to participate.
Remarks: Only a few deserted, old buildings are still present, including replicas of the Ingalls Hotel, its actual name the Pierce O.K. Hotel, a livery stable, saloon, and general store. There used to be a schoolhouse, the first Sunday school for a Baptist church, right in front of the old fire station building.

Ingersoll

County: Alfalfa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°47′47″N 98°23′41″W / 36.79639°N 98.39472°W / 36.79639 -98.39472
Elevation: 1,204 ft (367 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Ingersoll is a small unincorporated community in Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, United States.
Remains: Ingersoll was named for Philadelphia railroad owner, Charles E. Ingersoll. A post office was established September 13, 1901. The Choctaw Northern railway (later owned by the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific) became the county’s first railroad in 1901, when it connected Ingersoll to the other Alfalfa county towns of Aline, Augusta, Lambert, Driftwood, Amorita, and then continuing on into Kansas. Its post office was closed December 31, 1942. The Ingersoll Tile Elevator (ca. 1920) was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Ioland

County: Ellis
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1894
Disestablished: 1908
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Iron Post

County: Mayes
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°9′55″N 95°8′39″W / 36.16528°N 95.14417°W / 36.16528 -95.14417
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Iron Post is a census-designated place (CDP) in Mayes County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 117 at the 2000 census, but had declined to 92 in 2010, a loss of more than 21 percent.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Jefferson

County: Grant
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°43′9″N 97°47′26″W / 36.71917°N 97.79056°W / 36.71917
Elevation: 1,047 ft (319 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Jefferson is a town in Grant County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 12 at the 2010 census, a 67.6 percent decline from 37 at the 2000 census.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Jennings

County: Pawnee
Zip Code: 74038
Latitude / Longitude: 36°10′50″N 96°34′11″W / 36.18056°N 96.56972°W / 36.18056
Elevation: 932 ft (284 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Jennings is a town in Pawnee County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 363 at the 2010 census, a 2.7 percent decline from 373 at the 2000 census.
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Jester

County: Greer
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Johns

County: Pushmataha
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Johns was a community in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, north of Antlers.
Remains: A United States Post Office operated here from September 28, 1912 to May 15, 1915. It took its name from nearby Johns Valley, which had been named for Henry A. Johns, a Choctaw Indian land allottee.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Jumbo

County: Pushmataha
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34° 26′ 43″ N, 95° 44′ 8″ W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Jumbo is an unincorporated community in western Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 10 miles north of Miller.
Remains: A United States Post Office was established for Jumbo, Indian Territory on November 8, 1906. The post office took its name from the Jumbo Asphalt Company, a prominent local employer. Prior to Oklahoma’s statehood, Jumbo was located in Jack’s Fork County of the Choctaw Nation, in the Indian Territory. Jumbo was blessed by abundant natural resources, including asphalt. Hugh W. Adams (ca. 1836-1905), one of the original pioneers of Antlers, Oklahoma, and a prospector, located the asphalt vein at Jumbo. The Jumbo Asphalt Company established mining operations there and, by 1904, the community was known as Jumbo Mines. By 1905 the company was mining up to eight tons of asphalt per day, which it shipped to Moyers, Oklahoma via a dedicated tram line. The line stretched from Jumbo south through the Impson Valley, rounding the foot of Parker Mountain into Moyers, where it connected with the railhead at the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway.
Current Status: Despite improvements in the local roadways, Jumbo remains physically isolated from other communities in Pushmataha and Atoka counties. This is ironic, as the four-lane Indian Nation Turnpike was built through Impson Valley, passing just to the east of the community, and opened in 1970. It features no interchange for Jumbo, however, causing local residents to venture to Daisy on the north to enter or exit the turnpike.
Remarks: By 1906, Jumbo Mines was home to at least 40 families. This remained the case through recent decades, when the countryside around Jumbo emptied due to lack of economic opportunities and its churches, school, and post office closed. Jumbo is located in the picturesque Impson Valley. Buck Creek and Box Springs mountains frame the eastern side of its valley, and Long Mountain frames the western side. In recent years the territory to the west of Jumbo has been incorporated into McGee Creek State Park, particularly the area of Wildcat and Bugaboo canyons.

Kell City

County:
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Keokuk Falls

County: Pottawatomie
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 35° 24′ 18″ N, 96° 38′ 11″ W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Keokuk Falls is a ghost town in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma. The location is 4.5 miles north and 15 miles east of Shawnee. and one mile west of the Creek Nation and one mile north of the Seminole Nation across the North Canadian River. It was named after Chief Moses Keokuk (1821-1908). He is buried in Stroud, Oklahoma’s Sac and Fox cemetery.
Remains: Had a post office from January 13, 1892, until February 15, 1918. Henry J. Jones was the first postmaster. Mail was sent to Prague after the Post Office closed. Had one newspaper, the Keokuk Kall. Platted at the opening of the Sac and Fox Reservation on September 22, 1891. Became one of the most famous liquor towns in Oklahoma, because it was in the “wet” Oklahoma Territory near the “dry” Indian Territory. The town became dry at statehood.
Current Status:
Remarks:

Keystone

County: Mineral
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Kiamichi

County: Pushmataha
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34° 38′ 7″ N, 95° 10′ 44″ W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Kiamichi is a former community in northern Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, six miles east of Tuskahoma. A United States Post Office was established at Kiamichi, Indian Territory on September 27, 1887 and operated until September 14, 1962. The community and post office took their name from the nearby Kiamichi River. Prior to Oklahoma’s statehood Kiamichi was located in Wade County, Choctaw Nation.
Remains: During the 1880s, the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway, more popularly known as the “Frisco”, built a line from north to south through the Choctaw Nation, connecting Fort Smith, Arkansas with Paris, Texas. The railroad paralleled the Kiamichi River throughout much of its route in present-day Pushmataha County. Train stations were established every few miles to aid in opening up the land and, more particularly, to serve as the locations of section houses. Supervisors for their respective miles of track lived in the section houses to administer the track and its right-of-way. These stations also served as points at which the trains could draw water.
Current Status: The site of Kiamichi was selected because of its proximity to the Kiamichi River, with its abundant water supply. Adjacent station stops were established to the north and south. The sparsely populated area, at that time known as Jack’s Fork County of the Choctaw Nation, in the Indian Territory, was home to Choctaw Indians who farmed or subsisted on the land. Few roads or trails existed. Transportation was provided by the Frisco Railroad, which offered six trains per day—three in each direction—until it closed to passenger traffic during the late 1950s. It continued freight operations until 1981, when it closed altogether and its rails were removed. The loss of passenger rail fortunately coincided with the paving of U.S. Highway 271.
Remarks: Pushmataha County, during its early decades, was home to prosperous cotton farming industry and other agricultural pursuits. Cotton farming had taken place around Kiamichi since territorial times, and a sizable African-American population came to live there. In later decades, with the eclipse of cotton and other agriculture to cattle ranching, the African-American population departed for elsewhere, generally to the south, in search of greater social and economic opportunities. More information on Kiamichi, its former African-American residents, and the Kiamichi River valley may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society.

Kibby

County: Harper
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

Kosoma

County: Pushmataha
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34° 20′ 54″ N, 95° 36′ 47″ W
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Kosoma is a ghost town and former railroad station in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, United States. It is located just off Oklahoma State Highway 2, about 10 miles (16 km) north of Antlers.
Remains: Kosoma is located in a rugged but scenic area. It is adjacent to the Kiamichi River at the base of Big Mountain, also known as Deer Mountain. Close by is Lost Mountain, notable for its relative cone shape and location in the middle of the Kiamichi River valley, apart from other mountains. The area of the valley floor on which Kosoma was built is bracketed by two locally prominent and well-watered streams: Buck Creek to the south and Pine Creek to the north. A permanent settlement has existed at the site of modern Kosoma since at least the 1880s. During the 1880s, the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway, more popularly known as the “Frisco”, built a line from north to south through the Choctaw Nation, connecting Fort Smith, Arkansas with Paris, Texas. The railroad paralleled the Kiamichi River throughout much of its route in present-day Pushmataha County. Train stations were established every few miles to aid in opening up the land and, more particularly, to serve as the locations of section houses. Supervisors for their respective miles of track lived in the section houses to administer the track and its right-of-way. These stations also served as points at which the trains could draw water.
Current Status: At this writing, Kosoma is a ghost town with only two or three buildings still standing. These are found just off the short “Kosoma Loop” off State Highway 2 and have been subject to vandalism and theft by visitors, and neglect by current owners of the property. During World War II, the Kosoma area was the site of two lethal air crashes. British pilots operating from a Royal Air Force base in Texas, hampered by poor weather, crashed into White Rock Mountain and Big Mountain, killing four crewmen. Two planes were destroyed, while a third plane crash-landed successfully a few miles northwest at Jumbo. On February 20, 2000 the AT6 Monument was dedicated in the fliers’ honor at the crash site on Big Mountain, just southeast of Kosoma. Over 1,000 people attended the ceremony, and the story was carried by the British Broadcasting Corporation and many newspapers around the world.
Remarks: A United States Post Office was established at Kosoma, Indian Territory on November 28, 1888, a testament to its early vitality so soon after the railroad opened. With the logging of forests in the region, Kosoma went into a steep decline during the early 1900s (decade), culminating in the loss of its post office in 1954. More information on Kosoma and the Kiamichi River valley may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society.

Kusa

County: Okmulgee
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1916
Disestablished: 1936
Comments:
Remains:
Current Status:
Remarks:

How Many Ghost Towns Are In Oklahoma?