Ghost Towns of Oklahoma (C-E)

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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Cardin

County: Ottawa
Zip Code: 74335
Latitude / Longitude: 36°58′32″N 94°51′6″W / 36.97556°N 94.85167°W / 36.97556
Elevation: 810 ft (247 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Cardin is a ghost town in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 150 at the 2000 census, but plummeted to 3 at the 2010 census in April 2010. The town is located within the Tar Creek Superfund site; the vast majority of its residents accepted federal buyout offers, and the town’s population dropped to zero in November 2010.
Remains: The town of Cardin was originally known as Tar Creek, when it was founded as a mining town in 1913. In 1918, William Oscar Cardin, a member of the Quapaw tribe, and his wife, Isa Wade Cardin, had his 40-acre allotment platted and recorded with the county clerk. The town name changed from Tar Creek to Cardin in 1920. There were 2,640 residents in 1920.
Current Status: The town, along with Picher, and Hockerville, is located within the Tar Creek Superfund site. These towns are part of a $60 million federal buyout because of lead pollution, as well as risk of buildings caving in due to decades of mining. Cardin, Oklahoma, officially closed its last business, the post office, on February 28, 2009. In April 2009, federal officials stated that only seven residences were occupied in Cardin, and that the town’s water service would soon be shut off. This made Cardin the first city within the area to be completely closed down. In November 2010, the last family in Cardin received its final buyout payment from the federally funded Lead-Impacted Communities Relocation Assistance Trust and departed, reducing the town’s population to zero.
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Carpenter

County: Mesa
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Comments: Carpenter is a ghost town in Mesa County, Colorado, United States, twelve miles northeast of Grand Junction at the end of an extension to 27¼ Road. The settlement was established by William Thomas Carpenter early in 1890 to provide the miners who worked in his two Book Cliff mines with a place to live. He began building shacks to house his single miners and later erected small houses for the employees with families.
Remains: As a result of the town’s rapid growth, a request to the U.S. post office to establish a branch there in June 1890 was quickly obliged and the community was officially dubbed Carpenter. However, the town never attained a population of over 50, and the post office closed its doors after only a year. After the closure of its post office, Carpenter built a company store and a combination boarding house/restaurant. Book Cliff company stone cutters and masons constructed several buildings and many foundations at Carpenter, using stone from the company quarry near the cliffs. One of the finest examples of a building made of Book Cliff sandstone is the Fruita, Colorado Catholic church. Several years of prosperity followed the arrival of the Little Book Cliff Railway at the townsite in 1892. Carpenter began to formulate big plans for his village. He envisioned it as a tourist resort complete with hotel, dance pavilion, picnic areas, and even a lake that was to be fed by a spring located near his Book Cliff mines.
Current Status: The old eating house, referred to as the Hotel de Carpenter on occasion, was converted into a school and church for the camp’s inhabitants, and many company structures were rebuilt and improved during Wyman’s tenure as owner. The new name Book Cliff was applied to the town but did not adhere any better than did Poland Springs. Usually people referred to the place as the “Book Cliff Mines.” The town reached its zenith and then began a gradual decline following Wyman’s death in 1910. In his will Wyman left the town, railroad, and mines to Princeton University. Princeton managed everything for 15 years then decided to abandon it all in 1925. By the end of that summer nearly everything had been sold, dismantled, and hauled away.
Remarks: Carpenter renamed the camp Poland Spring after a noted resort of that name in Maine. It was variously referred to as Polen, Pollen, and Polan Springs, despite the fact that Carpenter’s intended name was evidenced by his having it emblazoned on the side of one of his railroad excursion cars. The resort plans were never completed because Carpenter went broke shortly after the Panic of 1893. Isaac Chauncey Wyman, a wealthy Massachusetts investor, became the next owner of the Book Cliff company. The town continued to enjoy an active existence because he did much to improve the mines and thus created a need for additional employees.

Carter Nine

County: Osage
Zip Code: 74634
Latitude / Longitude: 36°44′41″N 96°39′41″W / 36.74472°N 96.66139°W / 36.74472
Elevation: 1,122 ft (342 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Carter Nine was an unincorporated community in Osage County, Oklahoma, United States, located 2.5 miles (4.0 km) south of Shidler. Carter Nine had a post office, which opened on August 14, 1928. Carter Nine began as a company-owned town to house workers for an oil refinery operated by the Carter Oil Company. The company originally planned to build housing in Burbank, but decided the cost would be too high. Instead it created its own town in 1922, known as Carter Nine. The name Carter Nine was derived from a combination of the Carter Oil Company and the community’s location in Section 9 of Township 26 North, Range 6 East.
Remains: The fenced and gated town initially contained fifty houses. As the community grew during the 1920s, another 50 private homes were built outside the fence. The community had its own school, with a faculty of eight teachers. It also had a post office, general store, service station, company offices and a large naphtha plant.
Current Status: The refinery was transferred to Skelly Oil Company and then to Phillips Petroleum Company before its permanent closure in 1945. The high school closed in 1942, and thereafter students attended high school in Shidler. The town was abandoned after the plant was closed in the 1950s, when only 39 houses remained, compared to a peak of 300. None of its buildings currently remain standing.
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Cayuga

County: Delaware
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°38′2″N 94°40′45″W / 36.63389°N 94.67917°W / 36.63389
Elevation: 755 ft (230 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Cayuga Springs is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 140 at the 2010 census, a 33.3 percent increase from 105 at the 2000 census.
Remains: It was established on the Elk River in the old Seneca Reserve in Indian Territory. The Cayuga Springs Post Office existed from June 11, 1884, until April 30, 1905.
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Center

County: Pontotoc
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1880s
Disestablished: 1900
Comments: Destroyed by fire. Old site 1/2 mile north of new community of Center, Oklahoma.
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Centralia

County: Hernando
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Latitude / Longitude: 28°36’58″N 82°36’22″W
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Time Zone: Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
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Comments: Governing body
Remains: Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
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Cestos

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Established: 1898
Disestablished: 1923
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Chahta Tamaha

County: Bryan
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Latitude / Longitude: 34°3’1″N 96°11’59″W
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Established: 1845
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Comments: Chahta Tamaha (Choctaw Town) was an important town in the Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory that served as the Choctaw capital from 1863 to 1883. The town grew up around the Armstrong Academy. The townsite is located in present-day Bryan County, Oklahoma. Today nothing is left of the town or the Academy. However, the Armstrong Academy Site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
Remains: Armstrong Academy was founded as a school for Choctaw boys in 1844. It was named after William Armstrong, a popular agent of the Choctaws. The site was selected because there was a good fresh water spring with enough current to run a gristmill. A large wood supply was available. The first classroom buildings and dormitories were built of logs from the area. In the late 1850s a brick building replaced the log building. A two-story brick addition was added later. A trading post, blacksmith and church were established early on. As a school the average attendance was about 65 students though in 1859 it had about 100 students.
Current Status: The Armstrong Academy was destroyed by fire in February 1921. The Federal government refused to rebuild it, and today the area has reverted to its original state as a deserted pasture. Nothing remains of the town but rubble from the Armstrong Academy.
Remarks: Chahta Tamaha remained the capital of the Choctaw Nation until 1883, when the capital was relocated to Tuskahoma. In that same year the Armstrong Academy again became a school. Admission was limited to orphaned boys.

Chant

County: McCurtain
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Established: 1922
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Comments: Merged into McCurtain, Oklahoma
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Charleston

County: Elko
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Latitude / Longitude: 41°40′15″N 115°30′38″W / 41.67083°N 115.51056°W / 41.67083
Elevation: 6,076 ft (1,852 m)
Time Zone: Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
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Comments: Charleston is a ghost town in Elko County, Nevada, United States. It lies along the Bruneau River just south of the Mountain City and Jarbidge Ranger Districts of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest and is near the southwest edge of the Jarbidge Wilderness.
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Chase

County: Muskogee
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Cheek

County: Carter
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Latitude / Longitude: 34°04′42″N 97°16′57″W / 34.07833°N 97.28250°W / 34.07833 -97.28250
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Comments: Cheek is an unincorporated community located in Carter County, Oklahoma. The elevation is 814 feet.
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Cherokee Town

County: Garvin
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Established: 1874
Disestablished: 1877
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Chism

County: McClain
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Chisholm Spring

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Comments: Chisholm Spring was a small trading post in Oklahoma Territory, two miles east of present-day Asher, Oklahoma. The post was established by frontier cattleman Jesse Chisholm (for whom the famous Chisholm Trail was named ) in 1847. The settlement attracted many plains Indians, but efforts to create a town were aborted when Chisholm moved to Kansas in 1862.
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Citra

County: Hughes
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Clarkson

County: Payne
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Latitude / Longitude: 36° 0′ 24″ N, 97° 15′ 52″ W
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Comments: Clarkson was a small community located north of the Cimarron River in Payne County, Oklahoma Territory. Founded by Dunkers (Church of the Brethren), the post office opened January 31, 1890, with Grant T. Johnson as the postmaster. The post office closed February 28, 1903. On January 3, 1894, members of the Doolin Gang held up the community store and post office taking supplies, tobacco, cash, and registered mail.
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Current Status: The only remaining trace of the community is the cemetery.
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Clebit

County: McCurtain
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Latitude / Longitude: 34°23’25″N 95°01’13″W
Elevation: 866 ft (264 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Clebit is an unincorporated community in McCurtain County, Oklahoma, United States. The community is 11 miles (18 km) west of Bethel. A post office opened in Clebit on May 7, 1924. The community was named for sawmill foreman John Clebo.
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Clemscott

County: Carter
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°20′50″N 97°27′24″W / 34.34722°N 97.45667°W / 34.34722
Elevation: 938 ft (286 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Clemscott (also known as Clemscot) is an unincorporated community in Carter County, Oklahoma, United States. Clemscott is located on Oklahoma State Highway 53 8.1 miles (13.0 km) north-northeast of Healdton. The community once had a post office.
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Cloud Chief

County: Washita
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Latitude / Longitude: 35° 15′ 9″ N, 98° 50′ 35″ W
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Comments: Cloud Chief is a small unincorporated community in Washita County, Oklahoma, United States. Once the county seat of Washita County, it is now considered a ghost town. Only a few buildings remain, mostly in disrepair.
Remains: After the Cheyennes and Arapahos settled down on “their” reservation. What an empire this was – 4,297,711 acres and only slightly more that 3000 Indians, two-thirds Cheyennes and one-third Arapahos. In 1890, the government once again met with the Cheyennes and Arapahos. They persuaded each Indian to take an allotment of 160 acres each and release the balance of their tribal domain in consideration of which they were promised $1,500,000. The money was kept in the Treasury and placed on credit for the tribes, where it would draw five per cent interest. This interest was to be paid annually on a per capita basis. On the 19th of July 1891, the payment in hard cash began. Each Cheyenne and Arapaho Indian received seventy-five silver dollars. By October 1891, some 2835 members of these tribes had received $212,625. By March 1892, 3,329 allotments (160 acre farms) had been made, involving over 500,000 acres of land. This left a balance of 3,500,000 acres which were released for white settlements
Current Status: The Cloud Chief public schools opened for the 1892-1893 school year. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) built a high school in 1938, which closed after the 1959-1960 school year. The high school was known as the Cloud Chief Warriors. The Cloud Chief post office closed on December 31, 1964. The town also lost its charter in 1964.
Remarks: Cloud Chief was also previously home of two newspapers. It was home to the Cloud Chief Witness, as well as the Cloud Chief Beacon. The Cloud Chief Beacon moved and became the Cordell Beacon immediately after the August 17, 1900 issue was printed. After moving to Cordell, the newspaper continued publication from January 13, 1905 until February 17, 1919.

Cohn

County: Pushmataha
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Comments: Cohn is a former railroad switch and loading point on the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, nine miles south of Talihina, Oklahoma. It was named for William Cohn, gravel quarry operator. Cohn appears to have had a fairly short existence and never developed as a commercial or population center.
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Current Status: Prior to Oklahoma’s statehood the Cohn area was located in Wade County, Choctaw Nation. More information on Cohn may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society.
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Cold Springs

County: Kiowa
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1903
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Comments: Cleared for Tom Steed Reservoir.
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Conditville

County: Stephens
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Cooperton

County: Kiowa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°51′58″N 98°52′12″W / 34.86611°N 98.87000°W / 34.86611
Elevation: 1,555 ft (474 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Cooperton is a town in Kiowa County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 16 at the 2010 census, a decline of 20 percent from 20 at the 2000 census.
Remains: This community, originally called Cooper, was planned in 1899 by Frank Cooper, who had organized a settlement company in anticipation of the opening of the Kiowa, Comanche and Apache Reservation in August 1901. Learning that the land would be granted by lottery instead of a run, Cooper requested and was granted 320 acres for members of his company. The name had to be changed to Cooperton, because there was already another community named Cooper in the territory.
Current Status: Cooperton had one hundred residents by 1910, and reached its peak population of 187 by 1940. Thereafter, the population declined, reaching 20 by the start of the 21st Century.
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Corbett

County: Cleveland
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1893
Disestablished: 1930s
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Corner

County: Pottawatomie
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1903
Disestablished: 1906
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Cowboy Flats

County: Logan
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Cox City

County: Grady
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Latitude / Longitude: 34°43’31″N 97°43’54″W
Elevation: 1,207 ft (368 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Cox City is an unincorporated community in Grady County, Oklahoma. A post office operated in Cox City from 1927 to 1964. The town was named after an oil man, Edwin B. Cox, from Ardmore, Oklahoma.
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Cross

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Crum Creek

County: Pushmataha
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Comments: Crum Creek is a former railroad spur along the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 14 miles southwest of Tuskahoma, Oklahoma.
Remains: A United States Post Office operated here from February 9, 1916 to July 30, 1927. The railroad spur took its name from nearby Crum Creek, a branch of the Kiamichi River, which in turn took its name from a local resident.
Current Status: More information on Crum Creek and the Kiamichi River valley may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society.
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Dawson

County: Tulsa
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1949
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Comments: Annexed by the City of Tulsa.
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Denoya

County: Osage
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°46′03″N 96°42′27″W / 36.76763°N 96.707625°W / 36.76763
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Comments: Whizbang, officially called Denoya, Oklahoma, was an Oklahoma petroleum boom town in the 1920s and 1930s. Located in Osage County 1.5 miles north and 1.5 miles west of the present town of Shidler, The Whizbang area at its peak had a population of 10,000 persons and 300 businesses and was considered the rowdiest of the many oil field towns in Oklahoma.
Remains: Whizbang was officially known as Denoya by the post office which did not consider the name Whizbang to be dignified. Denoya was the name of a prominent French/Osage Indian family.
Current Status: Today the rubble and remains of Whizbang/Denoya can easily be seen from the road. Several sidewalks still parallel the road, and a number of building foundations are still in the area. A few occupied houses are still nearby.
Remarks: Perhaps the most infamous of the Oklahoma oil boom towns, Whizbang (or Denoya) came into existence overnight in 1921 when E.W. Marland drilled a 600 barrel per day oil well and precipitated an “oil rush” to the area. Both the quality and quantity of the petroleum were superb. The origin of the name “Whizbang” is uncertain. It may refer to a cartoon character of the day or to a madame of a brothel who called herself Whizbang Red. Customers planning to visit her establishment said they were going to see “Whizbang” and the name was quickly applied to the whole town.

Dillard

County: Carter
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Latitude / Longitude: 34°11′14″N 97°24′17″W / 34.18722°N 97.40472°W / 34.18722 -97.40472
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Comments: Dillard is an unincorporated community located in Carter County, Oklahoma. The elevation is 902 feet.
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Diamond

County: Haskell
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Doaksville

County: Choctaw
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Comments: Doaksville is a former settlement, now a ghost town, located in present-day Choctaw County, Oklahoma. It was founded between 1824 and 1831, by people of the Choctaw Indian tribe who were forced to leave their homes in the Southeastern United States and relocate in an area designated in for their resettlement in Indian Territory. The community was named for Joseph Doak, co-owner of the local trading post. The town flourished until the U.S. Army abandoned nearby Fort Towson in 1854, though it remained as the Choctaw capital until 1859, then declined precipitately after being bypassed by a new railroad in 1870. It is now a ghost town and an archaeological preservation site.
Remains: Accessibility to steamboat traffic on the Red River made Doaksville a principal town of the Choctaw Nation in the Indian Territory. In the 1820s and 30s, it was a major destination for Choctaws who were required to move from their homes in the Southeast and move to Indian Territory. Josiah and his brother originally established the post at the mouth of the Kiamichi River, then relocated one mile west of the Fort Towson-Doaksville Cemetery, after the U.S. Army established Fort Towson in 1824. The community began significant growth in 1831, when the Army reactivated Fort Towson nearby, across the creek to the east.
Current Status: The Oklahoma Historical Society acquired the Doaksville site in 1960 and sponsored archaeological digs during the 1990s. It maintains an archeological preservative site at Doaksville. A walkway and explanatory signs were put in place during 2001, so that visitors can view the foundations of several structures and many artifacts that were discovered during digs in 1995, 1996 and 1997. A site known as the Doaksville Site (NRID = 75001561) in the town of Fort Towson, Oklahoma was added to the National Register of Historic Places on May 29, 1975.
Remarks: By 1850, it was the largest town in Indian Territory. It then had more than thirty buildings[a] There were two newspapers, at least one of which, the Choctaw Intelligencer, was printed in the Choctaw language. In 1855, the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations formally separated. Doaksville served as the capital of the Choctaw Nation between 1860 and 1863. An 1860 convention in Doaksville ratified the Doaksville Constitution that guided the Choctaw Nation until 1906. The capital moved to Mayhew Mission in 1859, then to Chahta Tamaha in 1863., The Oklahoma Historical Society claims that Doaksville began to decline in importance in 1854, when the U.S. Army abandoned Fort Towson.

Doby Springs

County: Harper
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Latitude / Longitude: 36° 50′ 17″ N, 99° 46′ 55″ W
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Doby Springs was a community in Harper County, Oklahoma, United States, about eight miles west of Buffalo. The post office was in existence from January 13, 1908, until April 29, 1922. The community was named for townsite owner, C.C. Doby. Doby Springs is currently a recreational park, municipal golf course and the source of water for the city of Buffalo, Oklahoma.
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Douglas City

County: Oklahoma
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1894
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Douthat

County: Ottawa
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Latitude / Longitude: 36°57′33″N 94°50′10″W / 36.95917°N 94.83611°W / 36.95917
Elevation: 814 ft (248 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Douthat is a ghost town in Ottawa County, Oklahoma, United States. Douthat is 2 miles (3.2 km) south of Picher. Douthat once had a post office, which opened on March 17, 1917. The community was named after Zahn A. Douthat, the owner of the townsite. Douthat is now abandoned and part of the Tar Creek Superfund site.
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Downs

County: Kingfisher
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1889
Disestablished: 1900
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Eagle City

County: Blaine
Zip Code: 73658
Latitude / Longitude: 35°55′59″N 98°35′30″W / 35.93306°N 98.59167°W / 35.93306 -98.59167
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Comments: Eagle City is a small rural community located on State Highway 58 in western Blaine County, Oklahoma, United States. Established on the Frisco Line before statehood, the post office was named Dillon. The Dillon Post Office opened July 26, 1902. The name was changed to Eagle City September 4, 1909. The ZIP Code is 73658.
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Eddy

County: Kay
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Latitude / Longitude: 36°43′54″N 97°27′31″W / 36.73167°N 97.45861°W / 36.73167
Elevation: 1,066 ft (325 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Eddy is an unincorporated community in Kay County, Oklahoma, United States. It is 7 miles southwest of Blackwell, Oklahoma. The community was originally called Osborne, but its name was changed to Eddy on January 3, 1901. It was named “Eddy” after Ed E. Peckham, who was the son of railroad developer E.L. Peckham. A post office operated in Eddy but closed on February 22, 1957.
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Empire

County: Ellsworth
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 38°39’12″N 098°02’09″W
Elevation: 1,506 ft (459 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Empire Township is a township in Ellsworth County, Kansas, USA.
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Current Status: As of the 2000 census, its population was 174.
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Erin Springs

County: Garvin
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 34°48′48″N 97°36′12″W / 34.81333°N 97.60333°W / 34.81333
Elevation: 994 ft (303 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Comments: Erin Springs is a town in Garvin County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 87 at the 2010 census, a decline of 23.7 percent from 114 at the 2000 census.
Remains: The town began in 1871, when Frank Murray, an Irish immigrant from Londonderry, built a home at this location. He later became a large landowner and cattle rancher, owning 20,000 acres (8,100 ha) of land and 26,000 head of cattle. The community was initially known as Elm Springs, for a large elm tree that grew behind the stage depot. Elm Springs was renamed Erin Springs, in honor of Frank Murray’s sister, Erin Westland.
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Eubanks

County: Pushmataha
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Comments: Eubanks is a former community in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, 13 miles north of Antlers, Oklahoma. A United States Post Office was established for Eubanks, Indian Territory on February 26, 1907, and operated until April 30, 1934. It was named for William Eubanks, local lumberman.
Remains: During the 1880s the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway, more popularly known as the “Frisco”, built a line from north to south through the Choctaw Nation, connecting Fort Smith, Arkansas, with Paris, Texas. The railroad paralleled the Kiamichi River throughout much of its route in present-day Pushmataha County, Oklahoma. Train stations were established every few miles to aid in opening up the land and, more particularly, to serve as the locations of section houses. Supervisors for their respective miles of track lived in the section houses to administer the track and its right-of-way. These stations also served as points at which the trains could draw water.
Current Status: Few roads or trails existed. Transportation was provided by the Frisco Railroad, which offered six trains per day—three in each direction—until it closed to passenger traffic during the late 1950s. It continued freight operations until 1981, when it closed altogether and its rails were removed. The loss of passenger rail fortunately coincided with the construction of Oklahoma State Highway 2. More information on Eubanks and the Kiamichi River valley may be found in the Pushmataha County Historical Society.
Remarks: The site of Eubanks was selected because of its proximity to the Kiamichi River, with its abundant water supply. Adjacent station stops were established to the north and south. The sparsely populated area, at that time known as Jack’s Fork County of the Choctaw Nation, in the Indian Territory, was home to Choctaw Indians who farmed or subsisted on the land.

Eschiti

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How Many Ghost Towns Are In Oklahoma?