Ghost Towns of Oklahoma (Q-Z)

Oklahoma State Flag

Quay

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Quinlan

County: Woodward
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Latitude / Longitude: 36°27′16″N 99°02′43″W / 36.45444°N 99.04528°W / 36.45444
Elevation: 1,752 ft (534 m)
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Comments: Quinlan is an unincorporated community in Woodward County, Oklahoma, United States. Quinlan is located on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad 9 miles (14 km) east of Mooreland.
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Radium Town

County: Rogers
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Comments: Absorbed by Claremore
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Redden

County: Atoka
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Latitude / Longitude: 34°30′23″N 95°50′41″W / 34.50639°N 95.84472°W / 34.50639 -95.84472
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Comments: Redden was a small town located in northeastern Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States, on State Highway 43, about 13 miles northeast of Stringtown.
Remains: The Postal Service established a post office on June 1, 1903, in what was then Atoka County, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. It was named for John A. Redden (1873), a local resident who was appointed the first postmaster. The Statehood Proclamation was signed November 16, 1907. The post office at Redden, Oklahoma, was closed permanently on October 31, 1954.
Current Status: Much like Daisy, Redden was once a firmly established, thriving community. However, Redden is now little more than a small dot on the map. All that remains of the old town is the Redden Cemetery, fenced and well kept, and the ruins of the schoolhouse standing on the side of the road. Redden is considered a ghost town.
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Reed

County: Greer
Zip Code: 73554
Latitude / Longitude: 34°54′2″N 99°41′44″W / 34.90056°N 99.69556°W / 34.90056 -99.69556
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Comments: Reed, Oklahoma is a small unincorporated community located along State Highway 9 in Greer County, Oklahoma, United States. The post office opened September 16, 1892. The ZIP Code is 73554. Reed was said to have been named for the first postmaster, John Reed Graham.
Remains: The Ponder brothers, Major League Baseball player Charles Elmer Ponder and World War I Flying Ace William Thomas Ponder, were born in Reed and were of Cherokee descent.
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Reeding

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Reno City

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Richards Spur

County: Comanche
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Roxana

County: Logan
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Established: 1927
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Rodney

County: Pushmataha
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Latitude / Longitude: 34° 17′ 45.6″ N, 95° 37′ 44.4″ W
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Comments: Rodney is a former community in Pushmataha County, Oklahoma, five miles north of Antlers, Oklahoma.
Remains: A United States Post Office was established at Rodney, Indian Territory on June 30, 1890 and closed on July 5, 1899. The community was named for Rodney Moyer, early-day resident. It was located at the site of Rodney Crossing, a low-water ford on the Kiamichi River. During the short life of the community it was located in Jack’s Fork County, Choctaw Nation, in the Indian Territory. It was astride the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway, as well as Rodney Crossing, an important river ford where a north-south trail crossed the Kiamichi. An important local landmark is Rodney Mountain (767 ft.), also named for Rodney Moyer.
Current Status: The community was a “saw mill town”, centered on the activities, commerce and bustle generated by its saw mill. As timber was logged from nearby mountainsides the saw mill relocated to other areas deeper within the mountains. Rodney, which had never developed a population base or economic mainstay other than the mill, went out of existence.
Remarks: Rodney’s namesake, Rodney Moyer, left the area to participate in Alaska’s Klondike gold rush at about the time of the community’s disestablishment, according to information made available to the Pushmataha County Historical Society. His time and place of death are not known.

Roy Rogers

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Sacred Heart

County: Pottawatomie
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Latitude / Longitude: 35°0′4″N 96°48′33″W / 35.00111°N 96.80917°W / 35.00111 -96.80917
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Comments: Sacred Heart is a small unincorporated community in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, United States. Established in 1879 by Father Isidore Robot as a Catholic mission on the old Pottawatomie reserve, it was originally named Sacred Heart Mission. The name was changed to Sacred Heart in 1888, shortly before the area was opened to settlement by non-Indians.
Remains: The community of Sacred Heart revolved around the Sacred Heart Mission. During the early 20th Century, many of its functions moved to other locations. High school and college education for boys moved to St. Gregory in Shawnee in 1915. The post office was closed in 1954. The mission site is located nine miles east of US 177 (Asher, Oklahoma) on SH 39, then one mile north on Sacred Heart Road. The community is now considered a ghost town.
Current Status: The townsite contains a number of extant buildings and ruins. The most significant building on the site is the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, completed in 1914. It is located at the top of Bald Hill, represented as the highest point in Pottawatomie County. The church is an example of a restrained style of Gothic Revival, with a red tile roof and a stumpy front tower. Nearby are two cemeteries, one for the sisters and one for the abbey. Other buildings include one and two-story log houses dating to the late 1800s and a two-story sandstone bakery. The foundations of the school buildings and other structures are visible as well. A priest’s home, parish hall and maintenance building are non-contributing structures. The site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on September 15, 1983.
Remarks: By 1910, the Benedictines went on from Sacred Heart to build St. Gregory’s College in Shawnee, OK. A large Tudor-Gothic structure, now Benedictine Hall of St. Gregory’s University, was under construction by 1913, opening its doors for high school and college students for its first term in 1915. An elementary school for boys continued at Sacred Heart until 1926. Sacred Heart remained as their motherhouse for many years, until its transfer to Mt. Saint Mary’s in Oklahoma City. The transfer of the educational and monastic endeavors to St. Gregory’s College was complete by the early 1930s. The Sisters of Mercy founded numerous educational and medical facilities across the state, including St. Mary’s Academy (now Mount St. Mary High School) and Mercy Health Center in Oklahoma City. Sacred Heart reverted to use as a priory after all other functions had moved to St. Gregory’s. The priory closed permanently in 1965. The church remains, but most other buildings have been demolished.

San Bernardo

County: Jefferson
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Sante Fe

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Sardis

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Scipio

County: Pittsburg
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Latitude / Longitude: 35°03’17″N 95°57’24″W
Elevation: 725 ft (221 m)
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Comments: Scipio is an unincorporated community in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States. The community is 12 miles (19 km) northwest of McAlester. A post office opened at Scipio on January 24, 1980. The community was named for nearby Scipio Creek, which was in turn named for the Roman general Scipio Africanus.
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Scratchout

County: Sequoyah
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Shamrock

County: Imperial
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Latitude / Longitude: 33°07’06″N 115°34’48″W
Elevation: -197 ft (-60 m)
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Comments: Shamrock is a former settlement in Imperial County, California. It was located on the Southern Pacific Railroad 4 miles (6.4 km) west of Calipatria, at an elevation of 197 ft (60 m) below sea level. Shamrock still appeared on maps as of 1947.
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Short

County: Sequoyah
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Latitude / Longitude: 35°34′23″N 94°30′22″W / 35.57306°N 94.50611°W / 35.57306
Elevation: 751 ft (229 m)
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Comments: Short is a census-designated place (CDP) in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma, United States. It is part of the Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 328 at the 2000 census.
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Silver City

County: Owyhee
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Latitude / Longitude: 43° 1′ 1″ N, 116° 43′ 59″ W
Elevation: 6,179 feet (1,883 m)
Time Zone: Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
Established: 1864
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Comments: Silver City is a ghost town in Owyhee County, Idaho, United States. At its height in the 1880s, it was a gold and silver mining town with a population of around 2,500 and approximately 75 businesses. Silver City served as county seat of Owyhee County from 1867 to 1934. Today, the town has about 70 standing buildings, all of which are privately owned. Many of the owners are third- or fourth-generation descendants of the original miners. There are a handful of small businesses, but no gas or service stations. The property is now owned by the Bureau of Land Management.
Remains: Silver City was founded in 1864 soon after silver was discovered at nearby War Eagle Mountain (elev. 8,065 ft (2,458 m)). The settlement grew quickly and was soon considered one of the major cities in Idaho Territory. The first daily newspaper and telegraph office in Idaho Territory were established in Silver City. The town was also among the first places in present-day Idaho to receive electric and telephone service. The placer and quartz vein mines became depleted around the time Idaho became a state in 1890. Due in part to its extremely remote location, Silver City began a slow decline but was never completely abandoned. Small-scale mining continued off and on until World War II; the last mine to be operated all year round in Silver City was the “Potossi,” managed by Ned Williams.
Current Status: In 1972, the townsite and its environs were listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a historic district, the Silver City Historic District, with a total area of 10,240 acres (41.4 km2).
Remarks: The Idaho Hotel in Silver City was restored and re-opened for tourists in 1972. It relies on the use of propane refrigerators and stoves in order to supply cold drinks and snacks or a complete meal to guests during the summer months. The rooms are fitted with indoor plumbing and furnished with antiques, making it a tourist destination.

Smackover

County: Kay
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Stecker

County: Caddo
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Latitude / Longitude: 34°57′27″N 98°18′57″W / 34.95750°N 98.31583°W / 34.95750
Elevation: 1,352 ft (412 m)
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Comments: Stecker is an unincorporated community in Caddo County, Oklahoma, United States. Stecker is 5 miles (8.0 km) northeast of Apache.
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Sumpter

County: Kay
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Stuart

County: Hughes
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Latitude / Longitude: 34°54′3″N 96°6′0″W / 34.90083°N 96.10000°W / 34.90083
Elevation: 735 ft (224 m)
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Comments: Stuart is a town in Hughes County, Oklahoma, United States.
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Current Status: The population was 180 at the 2010 census, down from 220 at the 2000 census.
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Tahlonteeskee

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Comments: Tahlonteeskee, Oklahoma was the first capital city of the early western Cherokee Nation. It was named for Tahlonteeskee, who was the third Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation -West (1817–1819).
Remains: Tahlonteeskee was founded in 1828, and became the capital of the Cherokee Nation–West. Chief John Jolly, brother of Tahlonteeskee, posthumously named the town in his honor. It continued as the western Cherokee peoples’ capital from 1828 through 1839, when new arrivals from the Trail of Tears flooded the area. At that time, Takatoka briefly became capital before the transition of the council seat to Tahlequah, Oklahoma was finished—upon completion of the construction of the new capitol building—and the seat of the government permanently moved away. Tahlonteeskee continued for years as a council meeting place for Old Settlers in order to settle differences between differing tribal factions.
Current Status: Tahlonteeskee is the oldest governmental capital in Oklahoma, and is today a ghost town on private land in Gore, Oklahoma.
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Texanna

County: McIntosh
Zip Code: 74426
Latitude / Longitude: 35°21′3″N 95°31′57″W / 35.35083°N 95.53250°W / 35.35083
Elevation: 600 ft (183 m)
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Comments: Texanna is a census-designated place (CDP) in McIntosh County, Oklahoma, United States.
Remains: Established in District 12 of the old Indian Territory, its post office existed from June 27, 1888 until July 16, 1940. Texanna’s population in the 1905 Territorial Census was 200. It is said to have been named for a settlement of Texas Cherokees. Residents of Texanna now have a Eufaula postal address.
Current Status: The population was 2,083 at the 2000 census.
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Texola

County: Beckham
Zip Code: 73668
Latitude / Longitude: 35°13′11″N 99°59′32″W / 35.21972°N 99.99222°W / 35.21972
Elevation: 2,146 ft (654 m)
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Comments: Texola is a town in Beckham County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 36 at the 2010 census.
Remains: The History of Texola dates back to the early 1900s. Before being named Texola, the town site had been called Texokla and Texoma. Because of its location near the 100th Meridian, the town was surveyed eight different times, which meant that some early residents lived in both Texas and Oklahoma without ever moving. Texola was originally part of northern Greer County until Beckham County was formed after Oklahoma gained statehood in 1907. A post office was established in the community on December 12, 1901 with Reuben H. Grimes serving as the first postmaster. In 1902, the Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad (later owned by the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway) was built through the town. A weekly newspaper, the Texola Herald, began publishing in 1902 and continued to operate into the early 1920s. By 1909, Texola had two cotton gins as well as a corn and grist mill. The local economy was agriculturally based and several businesses opened in the community.
Current Status: The 1910 census recorded 361 people living in Texola. That same year, a small Territorial Jail was built. After a slight decline in population during the 1910s, Texola grew rapidly in the 1920s. The population peaked at 581 in the 1930 census. The arrival of Route 66 (also known as 5th Street) had a positive impact on the local economy. Cotton production increased during the decade, necessitating the need for two additional gins. As the town prospered, amenities such as a ten-acre park and an auditorium capable of seating 300 people were found in the community. The population began to decline in the 1940s and continued to do so throughout the remainder of the twentieth century. By 1980, Texola was a town of 106 residents. When the next census was conducted in 1990, Texola had lost nearly 58 percent of its population, leaving just 45 people in the town. That figure rose by two, to 47, in 2000. By 2010, the population had decreased to 36.
Remarks: Magnolia Service Station in Texola, Oklahoma is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, it was placed on the list in 1995. The station was built in 1930, by the Magnolia Petroleum Company on U.S. Route 66.

Three Sands

County: Kay
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Trousdale

County: Lincoln
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Latitude / Longitude: 37° 48′ 55″ N, 99° 5′ 8″ W
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Comments: Trousdale is an unincorporated community in Lincoln Township, Edwards County, Kansas, United States.
Remains: It began when a railroad junction was constructed in 1915. It is named for a Newton, Kansas resident who owned land in the vicinity. At its peak it boasted a bank (which closed during the Depression), Trousdale Grade School and High School, several retail establishments, and two grain elevators. A high line was built to the community in 1927 to provide electrical service.
Current Status: In 2006, the Trousdale Methodist Church, a repair shop/parts store, a grain storage facility, and an unmanned fuel retail outlet are the only businesses in addition to family farming operations that are in Trousdale. But due to the May 4, 2007 tornado, the Methodist Church was destroyed. A new church has been built on the site of the original church.
Remarks: A post office was opened in Trousdale in 1916, and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1967.

Tuskegee

County: Creek
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Uncas

County: Kay
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Violet Springs

County: Pottawatomie
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Washunga

County: Kay
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Latitude / Longitude: 36°47′1″N 96°50′17″W / 36.78361°N 96.83806°W / 36.78361 -96.83806
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Comments: Washunga is a small community in Kay County, Oklahoma, USA. Washunga was named for the last chief of the Kaw Indians. His name was usually spelled Washungah. The post office was established November 15, 1902 and discontinued November 25, 1906. The town was established at the former Kaw Agency.
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Current Status: The Kaw Indian Agency is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The name means “bird” in the Kaw language. In the early 1970s the residents of the town were relocated to the present site for the creation of Kaw Lake.
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Warwick

County: Lincoln
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Latitude / Longitude: 35°41′9″N 97°0′29″W / 35.68583°N 97.00806°W / 35.68583
Elevation: 876 ft (267 m)
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Comments: Warwick is a town in Lincoln County, Oklahoma, United States.
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Current Status: The population was 235 at the 2000 census.
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Webb

County: Osage
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Latitude / Longitude: 36°48′26″N 96°42′33″W / 36.80722°N 96.70917°W / 36.80722
Elevation: 1,099 ft (335 m)
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Comments: Webb City is an incorporated town in northwestern Osage County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 62 at the 2010 census, a 34.7 percent decline from 95 at the 2000 census. It was named for its founder, Horace Webb, on whose land the town was founded. The Webb City post office opened December 16, 1922.
Remains: Horace W, Webb, a native of Missouri, settled just south of Graniola, Oklahoma in 1910. He continued to purchase land and opened the area’s first school. The town of Webb City was incorporated on his land in September 1921. The post office opened in Webb City on December 16, 1922. Webb City was located at the northern end of the Burbank Oil Field, discovered in 1920. All mineral rights in Osage County were owned by the Osage tribe. The Osage Railway built a line through the town in 1924 connecting Shidler and Lyman, Oklahoma. Although the oil find brought a degree of prosperity, Webb City never developed into a modern town. Water was scarce and there was no electricity. The business district had unpaved streets and most of the buildings were built of wood frame and false fronts.
Current Status: The town began to decline in the late 1920s, as the oil boom faded. In 1928, it was heavily damaged by a tornado, and many of the businesses did not rebuild. The decline continued through the Great Depression. Its high school closed in 1944, and consolidated with the high school in Shidler. The elementary school closed in 1956, and consolidated with the elementary school in Shidler. The Osage Railway was abandoned in 1955.
Remarks: The 1930 census (the first census taken in Webb City) showed 493 residents. The population has declined thereafter.

Welcome

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Wellston Colony

County: Lincoln
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White Bead

County: Garvin
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Whizbang

County: Osage
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Latitude / Longitude: 36°46′03″N 96°42′27″W / 36.76763°N 96.707625°W / 36.76763 -96.707625
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Comments: Whizbang, officially called Denoya, Oklahoma, was an Oklahoma petroleum boom town in the 1920s and 1930s. Located in Osage County 1.5 miles north and 1.5 miles west of the present town of Shidler, The Whizbang area at its peak had a population of 10,000 persons and 300 businesses and was considered the rowdiest of the many oil field towns in Oklahoma.
Remains: Whizbang was officially known as Denoya by the post office which did not consider the name Whizbang to be dignified. Denoya was the name of a prominent French/Osage Indian family. Perhaps the most infamous of the Oklahoma oil boom towns, Whizbang (or Denoya) came into existence overnight in 1921 when E.W. Marland drilled a 600 barrel per day oil well and precipitated an “oil rush” to the area. Both the quality and quantity of the petroleum were superb. The origin of the name “Whizbang” is uncertain. It may refer to a cartoon character of the day or to a madame of a brothel who called herself Whizbang Red. Customers planning to visit her establishment said they were going to see “Whizbang” and the name was quickly applied to the whole town.
Current Status: Today the rubble and remains of Whizbang/Denoya can easily be seen from the road. Several sidewalks still parallel the road, and a number of building foundations are still in the area. A few occupied houses are still nearby.
Remarks: Whizbang was a violent place. The bank was robbed twice and “it wasn’t safe for a woman to be on the streets after dark.” Highway robbers frequently robbed travelers along the road to Shidler at a place called “Pistol Hill.” A man called “Jose Alvarado”, whose real name was Bert Bryant was hired by oil companies to keep the peace. Alvarado, a Texan, had ridden with Pancho Villa in Mexico. He was considered “everything from a cold-blooded killer to a Robin Hood.” Alvardo was once arrested for stealing $2,500 from a brothel owner, but he returned the money and was acquitted. He got into a gunfight with a lawman from a neighboring town over a woman. The other lawman killed the woman and shot Alvarado in the chest. In the ensuing melee, Alvarado shot the other man four times and had both his legs broken by bullets. The two men survived, were put in the same hospital, and became friends. With the exhaustion of the petroleum reserves in the late 1920s Whizbang declined. The post office, established in 1921, was closed in 1942, and today little remains of the town except a network of old roads. Persons who lived and worked near Whizbang during its heyday included oilmen E.W. Marland and Frank Phillips and future actors Ben Johnson, Jr., a cowboy and rodeo star, and Clark Gable who worked as a roustabout in the oil fields.

Wildman

County: Kiowa
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Wirt

County: Carter
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Latitude / Longitude: 34°13′51″N 97°31′54″W / 34.23083°N 97.53167°W / 34.23083 -97.53167
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Comments: Wirt is an unincorporated community in Carter County, Oklahoma. The town was named after Wirt Franklin, who was in the oil business. The community post office began operations on December 12, 1914.
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Witcher

County: Oklahoma
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Wolf

County: Seminole
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Latitude / Longitude: 35°05′15″N 96°39′31″W / 35.08750°N 96.65861°W / 35.08750
Elevation: 965 ft (294 m)
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Comments: Wolf is an unincorporated community in Seminole County, Oklahoma, United States. The United States Census Bureau does not maintain demographic data for Wolf.
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Womack

County: McClain
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Established: 1889
Disestablished: 1909
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Woodford

County: Carter
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Latitude / Longitude: 34°20′19″N 97°17′04″W / 34.33861°N 97.28444°W / 34.33861 -97.28444
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Comments: Woodford is an unincorporated community located in Carter County, Oklahoma. The townsite plat and cemetery are located within Section 34, Township 2 South, Range 1 West of the Indian Meridian. Its elevation is 932 feet. The zipcode is 73401. Woodford has its own telephone exchange, serviced by the Chickasaw Telephone Company. Phone numbers in Woodford are in the format 580-561-XXXX. The Woodford area had its own school district in the past, but it was closed as the community dwindled in population. Students in the area today attend school in the nearby towns of Springer, Lone Grove, or Fox.
Remains: The population of Woodford had already started to decline by 1930. In 1940, the census enumerated 138 residents. The school district and at least one church closed in the 1950s. The last remaining store closed in the late 1980s. The community still supports a volunteer fire department, however. Woodford is included in the book “Ghost Towns of Oklahoma”.
Current Status: The present population of Woodford has decreased very much in the last few years. The people of Woodford have settled down to an almost strictly farming district. There are a few more different occupations here; Mr. Greer owns a “goobernut plant”, this gives Woodford a manufacturing plant. At present there are two churches in Woodford, a post office, two stores, and a garage. Woodford has an accredited high school. There are five teachers in the school system. Two miles north from Woodford there is a lake built by the city of Ardmore. This lake supplies Woodford and Ardmore with water.
Remarks:

Woodville

County: Marshall
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 33°58′7″N 96°39′15″W / 33.96861°N 96.65417°W / 33.96861
Elevation: 748 ft (228 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: New Woodville is a town in Marshall County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 132 at the 2010 census. Proposals to annex the unincorporated areas of New Woodville and McBride on the shores of Lake Texoma were considered in the past. Listed erroneously by the Census Bureau as “Woodville” for many years, the town’s name was finally corrected in Census Bureau listings in 2005.
Remains: An earlier Oklahoma community named Woodville was submerged in 1944 when the Red River was dammed to create Lake Texoma.
Current Status: The drought of 2013 reduced the level of Lake Texoma sufficiently to expose some of Old Woodville’s foundations and storm cellars.
Remarks: According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2), all of it land. Armstrong Road, Durham Street, and Lee Ann Drive are north of the BNSF which do not have a bypass because they do not connect to any other streets.

Wybark

County: Muskogee
Zip Code:
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Yewed

County: Alfalfa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°40′56″N 98°24′36″W / 36.68222°N 98.41000°W / 36.68222
Elevation: 1,253 ft (382 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established:
Disestablished:
Comments: Yewed is an unincorporated community in Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, United States. Yewed is 0.7 miles (1.1 km) east of Lambert.
Remains: Yewed was platted in 1902 and had a station on the Kansas City, Mexico and Orient Railway. The community applied for a Post Office under the name Dewey in honor of Admiral George Dewey. However, since another community – Dewey, Oklahoma – already had that name, the letters were reversed and the name Yewed was assigned to the community. The Post Office operated from December 24, 1898, to April 30, 1952.
Current Status: As of 1977, the community had an operational grain elevator and a population of two.
Remarks:

Yonkers

County: Wagoner
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
Elevation:
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1913
Disestablished: 1935
Comments: Submerged by Fort Gibson Dam Fort Gibson Dam and Reservoir.
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Zena

County: Delaware
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude: 36°31′40″N 94°50′43″W / 36.52778°N 94.84528°W / 36.52778
Elevation: 951 ft (290 m)
Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
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Disestablished:
Comments: Zena is a census-designated place (CDP) in Delaware County, Oklahoma, United States, along State Highway 127.
Remains: Established on Courthouse Prairie in District 5 of the old Indian Territory, its post office existed from April 11, 1896, until January 31, 1956. It is said to have been named for Asenith Wood, the wife of the first postmaster.
Current Status: The population was 122 at the 2010 census.
Remarks:

Zincville

County: Ottawa
Zip Code:
Latitude / Longitude:
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Time Zone: Central (CST) (UTC-6)
Established: 1917
Disestablished: 1954
Comments: Former mining town between Picher and Hockerville
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How Many Ghost Towns Are In Oklahoma?